ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Food and Cooking»
  • Quick & Easy Recipes»
  • Quick & Easy Healthy Foods

Farm Fresh Zucchini & Cheese Souffle'

Updated on October 9, 2012

3 Chicks and Some Eggs

Three chicks in a basket of eggs.
Three chicks in a basket of eggs. | Source
Our hens are enjoying fresh fruits, including mango, papaya and melons. They also get scratch, corn, starter or layers mash and other vegetables.  The eggs are as healthy and fresh as their diet!
Our hens are enjoying fresh fruits, including mango, papaya and melons. They also get scratch, corn, starter or layers mash and other vegetables. The eggs are as healthy and fresh as their diet! | Source

Chicks, Hens and Lots of Eggs

This spring we acquired eight baby chicks, one of whom turned out to be a beautiful and elegant rooster. The other seven are growing hens and have just started to lay. We are getting one or two eggs each day. Most are brown, tan ones coming from Speckled Sussex and Barred Rocks, slightly pinkish from the Silver Wyandotte. The Austra Whites are a week older than the others, so they are just that much more advanced in their development and are giving us nice sized white eggs.

I love eggs. As an artist, I love the smooth shell and the beautiful ellipsoid shape.

As a cook, I find them to be extremely versatile. From creating a delicious main dish or a great snack to using them as a major structural ingredient in baked goods or sauces, for many cooks, eggs are an essential component of a full pantry. They are a breakfast mainstay, and also work well at lunch, dinner and snacks. And they have a place in every culture.

As a Dietitian and nutritionist, I find them to be well tolerated, even enjoyed, by most people, young and old, sick or well.

Eggs provide low calorie, inexpensive, high quality protein. They are loaded with vitamins A, D, E, and B complex, iron, calcium, choline, and trace minerals. For example, eggs are a good source of selenium, providing about 15.4 mg per large egg. Selenium supports immune function and thyroid health, is protective against heart disease and bone disorders and is an integral component to some antioxidants. Eggs are also a source of the antioxidants lutien and zeaxanthin which support eye health and are protective against macular degeneration. Choline is important for brain function and development.

And for those concerned about heart health, research has confirmed that the cholesterol in a large egg is not the culprit for heart disease once thought. Although a large egg provides about 213 mg cholesterol, it is really specific types of saturated fat that contribute most to heart disease, rather than dietary cholesterol. Since 2000, the American Heart Association has sanctioned eating up to 1 whole egg per day for adults (or 7 eggs per week).

Commercial Eggs and Pullet Eggs

The first white egg is a typical, commercially produced egg.  The second & third are from our chickens.  Smaller, fresher and delicious; with brighter yolks, indicating lots of nutrients.
The first white egg is a typical, commercially produced egg. The second & third are from our chickens. Smaller, fresher and delicious; with brighter yolks, indicating lots of nutrients. | Source

With the abundant gifts from our hens, I am finding new ways to use eggs. What we are getting are referred to as "pullet eggs", being relatively small from young chickens. A large commercially processed egg weighs about 2 oz and will fill 1/4 cup. Our girls are providing eggs that range from 1 to 1.5 oz, so I use a few more of them than the commercially processed variety.

Here is my latest recipe. This is a great way to get kids of all ages to eat more veggies. You can substitute just about any fresh or frozen vegetable for the zucchini.

Salting and draining the zucchini isn't required here as the liquid produced from the fresh zucchini is absorbed by the baking mix. I use Bisquick, but any brand will work. If you don't have any on hand, cut 1 Tbsp butter into 1/2 cup flour and 1/2 tsp non-aluminum baking powder.

The texture of the souffle' will be firm but light. If you want a softer texture, reduce the amount of baking mix to 1/2 cup.

Zucchini & Cheese Souffle'

Zucchini & Cheese Souffle, made with 8 of our fresh eggs (one of which had a double yolk).
Zucchini & Cheese Souffle, made with 8 of our fresh eggs (one of which had a double yolk). | Source

Cook Time

Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 40 min
Ready in: 55 min
Yields: 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 6 large Eggs, (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 4 cups grated zucchini, (about 2 medium squash)
  • 1 cup cheese, grated
  • 1/8 tsp onion powder
  • 1/8 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • 2/3 cup baking mix

Instructions

  1. Grease a soufflé dish or deep square baking pan. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
  2. Break the eggs into a large bowl and whip them with a wire whisk until fluffy. Add remaining ingredients and stir until well mixed.
  3. Pour into prepared pan and bake 35-40 minutes. Souffle is done when internal temperature reaches 155 degrees or a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Serve warm or cooled.

Zucchini & Cheese Souffle'

Nutrition Facts
Serving size: 1 piece
Calories 148
Calories from Fat72
% Daily Value *
Fat 8 g12%
Saturated fat 3 g15%
Unsaturated fat 5 g
Carbohydrates 9 g3%
Sugar 0 g
Fiber 1 g4%
Protein 8 g16%
Cholesterol 356 mg119%
* The Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet, so your values may change depending on your calorie needs. The values here may not be 100% accurate because the recipes have not been professionally evaluated nor have they been evaluated by the U.S. FDA.

Each serving provides 344 mg sodium.

5 stars from 1 rating of Zucchini & Cheese Souffle

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • rjsadowski profile image

      rjsadowski 5 years ago

      A good way to use zucchini. My father used to raise chickens when I was a boy. It was interesting to note that what they were fed greatly affected the flavor of the eggs and the color of the yolks.