ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Healthy Pizza Dough Recipes

Updated on July 02, 2012

Healthy Pizza Dough Recipes

I'm a believer in healthy pizza that tastes great and makes me feel good. While the toppings go a long way toward modifying the health of a pizza, the majority of calories start in the crust. In fact, most pizza dough recipes include tons of white flour and oil, making for a nutritionally-empty pizza base. Believe it or not, with a little whole wheat, anyone can make healthy pizza dough that has a fraction of the calories and all the flavor of a traditional dough recipe.

This article is my personal collection of healthy whole wheat pizza dough recipes, developed and perfected meticulously over two years. Pizza is a big part of our life in this house, so you better believe I've had plenty of chances to tweak these recipes to perfection!

Whole wheat pizza dough provides the bready texture crust enthusiasts love, while also making excellent thin crust pizza for those who are all about the toppings.
Whole wheat pizza dough provides the bready texture crust enthusiasts love, while also making excellent thin crust pizza for those who are all about the toppings. | Source

Tips for Great Pizza

Flour

Different brands of flour have varying ingredient quality and levels of protein. Even the location from which the brand sourced the ingredients can exert an influence on the final product. These differences vastly improve or decrease the performance of some flours over and above others. For this reason, it's useful to start with the best. The cost is usually just a matter of cents or dollars, but it can mean a stunning success or an abject failure. While it's wise to do your own research, especially if a family member has food allergies, the short list below encompasses the most common high-quality brands.

Recommended Flour Brands:

  • Bob's Red Mill
  • King Arthur
  • Great River Organic Milling

Yeast

Yeast is temperamental, to say the least. It needs love and coddling once it hits the liquid. Before all that warmth, however, it should be left in the cold. No, really! Happy yeast has just a few, easy requirements for storage:

  • coldness
  • dry air
  • darkness

So pack your yeast in an air-tight container and stick it in your freezer. Yeast will last months and years with this method.

Water Temperature

Yeast exposed to liquid loves temperatures between 78ºF to 80ºF. However, a temperature above 140ºF will instantly kill yeast, and temperatures below 40ºF will stop the yeast from working altogether. To ensure a proper yeast environment in the dough, use water that feels a bit warmer than body temperature.

Baking Stone

I cannot recommend enough using a baking stone (also called a pizza or bread stone) for your healthy pizzas, or healthy bread, for that matter. The perfect pizza crust requires a consistent and very hot surface. The baking stone provides that surface, while also absorbing excess moisture. In a pinch, the back of a cookie sheet or a pizza pan will do--just sprinkle it with cornmeal first. But oh, if you've had pizza baked on a baking stone, you will be reluctant ever to have any other kind.


Whole Wheat Pizza Dough Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (250g) Whole Wheat Flour
  • 2 1/4 tsp (1 packet) Yeast*
  • 3/4 tsp Salt
  • 3/4 cup Warm Water
  • 1 TBS Honey
  • 2 3/4 tsp Vital Wheat Gluten
  • 1 TBS Olive Oil

Directions

*If using active dry yeast, place it in a large bowl with the water and honey for 10 minutes, or until yeast is frothy. If using instant yeast, please disregard this step.

Mix together all the ingredients in a bowl. Turn out dough onto a lightly-floured surface and knead the dough for 10 minutes, or until dough is smooth. If using a stand mixer, use the dough attachment and knead on a low setting for about five minutes, or until dough is smooth and pulls away from the bowl cleanly.

Cover dough with a tea towel and allow to rise for one hour, or until doubled in size.

You may either roll out dough, cover with toppings, and bake, or roll out dough and bake for three or four minutes before removing to put on your healthy pizza toppings. Afterward, finish baking until crust has browned and cheese is melted.


The perfectly-risen pizza dough will have at least doubled in size and have a wonderfully stretchy texture.
The perfectly-risen pizza dough will have at least doubled in size and have a wonderfully stretchy texture. | Source

Healthy Half-Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup (100g) Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 3/4 cup (90g) All-Purpose or Bread Flour
  • 2 1/4 tsp (1 packet) Yeast*
  • 3/4 cup Warm Water
  • 2 tsp (14g) Honey
  • 1/2 tsp Salt or Salt Substitute

Directions

*If using active dry yeast, place it in a large bowl with the warm water for 10 minutes, or until frothy. If using instant yeast, please disregard this step.

Mix together all the ingredients in a bowl. Turn out dough onto a lightly-floured surface and knead the dough for 10 minutes, or until dough is smooth. If using a stand mixer, use the dough attachment and knead on a low setting for about five minutes, or until dough is smooth and pulls away from the bowl cleanly.

Cover dough with a tea towel and allow to rise for one hour, or until doubled in size.

Roll out dough, cover with toppings, and bake as desired (the hotter the better!).


Herbed Whole Wheat Pizza Dough

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (250g) Whole Wheat Flour
  • 2 1/4 tsp (1 packet) Yeast*
  • 3/4 tsp Salt or Salt Substitute
  • 1 cup Warm Water
  • 1 TBS Honey
  • 2 3/4 tsp Vital Wheat Gluten
  • 1 TBS Olive Oil
  • 1 1/2 tsp Italian Seasoning OR 1 1/2 tsp Fresh Oregano and 2 tsp Fresh Basil

Directions

*If using active dry yeast, place it in a large bowl with the warm water for 10 minutes, or until frothy. If using instant yeast, please disregard this step.

Mix everything together in the bowl, adding the herbs last. Turn out dough onto a lightly-floured surface and knead the dough for 10 minutes, or until dough is smooth. Be sure not to add too much flour to stabilize the moisture of the dough. If using a stand mixer, use the dough attachment and knead of a low setting for about five minutes, or until dough is smooth and pulls away from the bowl cleanly.

Cover dough with a tea towel and allow to rise for one hour, or until doubled in size.

This dough is quite flexible. You may either roll out dough, cover with toppings, and bake, or roll out dough and bake for three or four minutes before removing to put on your healthy pizza toppings. Afterward, finish baking until crust has browned and cheese is melted.


Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • KiloJKilo profile image

      KiloJKilo 5 years ago from Menomonie, WI

      I have spent many years researching the perfect pizza crust and have seen a lot of tweaks and variations and while obviously, a very subjective idea, I'd like to give some ideas that have made my pizza taste better. 1, take 75% of the flour and all the water and mix it up into a bloby mess. Let it stand like that for about 20 minutes. 2, after adding the rest of the ingredients and forming the ball I lightly coat the dough in olive oil, wrap, and store in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours. No longer then that. The type of water you use will also influence how your dough tastes. Experiment with filtered waters and the such. Happy cooking!

    • The Good Cook profile image

      The Good Cook 5 years ago

      Oh goody, healthy pizza! I usually just make certain to serve my pizza with a good-size serving of salad. That way I eat less pizza!

    • Recipe Gal profile image

      Recipe Gal 5 years ago

      While I do try to make healthy food for my family, I haven't experimented with whole wheat flour yet. Your article has me convinced that I need to try it though. You have some good recipes on here, and I love pizza. Do you have any tips for converting recipes we already have over to whole wheat flour? Can you just substitute it for white flour?

    • theseattlegirl profile image
      Author

      theseattlegirl 5 years ago from Seattle, WA

      @ Recipe Gal

      You can convert bread or all-purpose white flour to whole wheat, but I recommend using 1 1/4 tsp of vital wheat gluten per cup of whole wheat flour you use, especially if you like a chewier rather than a tender crust. Whole wheat tends to absorb more liquid, too, so you may want to keep an eye on dough moisture. I find that I need an extra TBS or two of water with whole wheat versus white flour, as well.

      Oh, and if your family is anything like my nieces and nephews, anything that isn't stark white terrifies them. So you might try to be sneaky and get white whole wheat flour, which is the same as whole wheat but *looks* like all-purpose white.

      Hope that helps!

    • Recipe Gal profile image

      Recipe Gal 5 years ago

      That does help, thank you!

    • RTalloni profile image

      RTalloni 5 years ago from the short journey

      You've encouraged me to again try something I've not had a lot of success with in the past--thanks! :)

      This hub has already generated some great comments! Voted up and bookmarked.

    • profile image

      CC 3 years ago

      Can you freeze this dough if you don't use it all in one day?

    • theseattlegirl profile image
      Author

      theseattlegirl 3 years ago from Seattle, WA

      @ CC,

      You can definitely freeze this dough! Just wrap it up very well with plastic wrap, and don't be surprised when it expands. :)

      - theseattlegirl

    • TycoonSam profile image

      TycoonSam 3 years ago from Washington, MI

      Good instruction and the video is a nice addition.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 3 years ago from Germany

      I love making my own pizza with healthy toppings. This recipe of yours sounds great and I´ll definitely try this. Thanks for sharing. Happy New Year 2014!

    Click to Rate This Article