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Sick Food

Updated on May 27, 2011
I will entice you with the magical secret ingredient: orange cheese.
I will entice you with the magical secret ingredient: orange cheese. | Source

I have read several hubs that show how easy it can be to create gourmet food, quickly, easily and cheaply, in one's own home, using, say, only a small charlotte potato and half a slice of Spanish onion. I would now like to add my own tasty dish to the HubPages Restaurant menu.  I can guarantee that you will never have tasted anything like it in any of even the best eating establishments anywhere on the planet.  I am hopeful that someone high up in the culinary world will see this hub and offer me vast amounts of cash for the privilege of being able to serve my dish in their restaurant.

Of course, I cannot actually claim credit for the creation of this dish, as it is a family favourite first invented by my mother; yes, that's right, a dish that has been passed down from mother to daughter for one whole generation.  I am sure that my children will continue the tradition and pass the recipe on to my grandchildren - if spaghetti is still available in a tin, that is.

So, without further ado, I give to you, the Nardone-Rawlinson family favourite ... Sick Food.  It's food that you eat when you're sick, not food that will make you sick.

Stay with me, honestly, it's delicious.
Stay with me, honestly, it's delicious. | Source

You will need:

medium-sized potatoes x 5 (more if you like alotta mash)

eggs x 6 (more, or less, depending on the size of your casserole dish; and free-range, naturally, make for a more pleasing colour of yoke)

tinned spaghetti x 2 (large tins, not those waste of time tiny ones)

cheese x 1/2 a block (125g roughly - again, more if you have a big casserole dish)


Lovely rich, canary yellow yokes.
Lovely rich, canary yellow yokes. | Source

Method:

  1. Hard boil the eggs - anything longer than five minutes should be plenty of time. I usually forget about them and they have a good twenty minutes on the boil. That's fine.
  2. Peel and chop the potatoes into small chunks (I was going to say 'cubes', but that would involve some precision chopping, and would take far too much time), and boil until soft in a right big pan filled with loads of hot water.
  3. Heat up the spaghetti, on a low flame, in a nice non-stick pan. Leave to simmer gently. I use a good non-stick pan because I usually forget about the spaghetti too, and early attempts to create this dish using inferior pans led to only half the quantity of spaghetti being usable.
  4. Now the potatoes will be ready. Drain and place back in the pan. Add a nob of butter, and mash the potatoes until they're smooth and silky as a smooth and silky thing. This part of the process can take anything up to half an hour, especially if you have one of those sub-standard plastic mashers.
  5. Shell and halve the eggs, and lay them yoke-side down in a large casserole dish. Make sure they're evenly spaced - you don't want to be fighting over them.
  6. Preheat the oven now to gas mark 7 (220ºc, 425ºf). Recipes usually call for the oven to be turned on at the beginning of cooking - but I find that this wastes a good deal of gas.
  7. Pour the spaghetti over the eggs, covering evenly.
  8. Spoon the mash over the top of the spaghetti. Try to spread it evenly, although to be honest, if you get it into the dish without mixing it totally in with the spaghetti and making a foul looking mess, then you're doing very well indeed. But don't worry about it's appearance because that's what step 9 is for.
  9. Now disguise the mess that you've made by covering it with the grated cheese.
  10. Pop it all in the oven to get the cheese all melty and brownish. It's up to you how brown you allow the cheese to get. Personally I like it melty underneath, but with a nice crispiness on the top.

Ooh, scrumptious.
Ooh, scrumptious. | Source

This dish will serve 4-6 people.  If you're very poorly, however, you might get about ten portions out of it; although, in that scenario, by the time you get near to the end of it, it might have started to go off.

If you do actually make this dish, then you probably are a little bit nutty.  Sometimes though, it's just what I fancy when I'm a bit under the weather.

Comments

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    • tnderhrt23 profile image

      tnderhrt23 6 years ago

      I love how you share your recipe with commentary! You done a fine job with this, Lady, and it looks yummy to me!

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 6 years ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      I'm speechless. You have written with such humor I can't tell... tinned spaghetti?? canned spaghetti?? Oh, my, I will take your word for it!

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      It's so delicious tnderhrt, that I'm having leftovers for breakfast!

      I say tinned, but you say canned? It's because I'm English :D Do you say tom-ah-to, or tom-ay-to? I say pot-ay-to - I don't think there's anyone in the world who says pot-ah-to.

      Linda.

    • Docmo profile image

      Mohan Kumar 6 years ago from UK

      I don't know whether to say yum or yuck - sounds intriguing .. If this is your sick food - pick - me - up I shudder to think what else you've got in that recipe book. Can't help but try it! Great fun. Great read too.

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      I have nothing else like this in my recipe book Docmo, thank goodness :) All of my other recipes are healthy and nutricious, but have far less humour in them. Humour is an essential ingredient in cooking, I think, so I will try to come up with more.

      Linda.

    • chspublish profile image

      chspublish 6 years ago from Ireland

      I guess there's goodness in the dish, as well as a lightness in the making of it.

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Well, it's got protein, carbohydrates, and erm, calcium. You could have it with salad, and it'd be a balanced meal!

    • christopheranton profile image

      Christopher Antony Meade 6 years ago from Gillingham Kent. United Kingdom

      I think it is just ideal, for someone like me, who likes to pretend he has cooked, but really wants dishes that are no trouble to make. Very wittily presented as well.

      Thank you.

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Exactly Chris, it's like real cooking, but with only a fraction of the effort, and almost less than half of the goodness! Perfect.

      Any time. What else would you like a recipe for? I can do a really nice beans on toast - highly nutritional actually.

      Linda.

    • profile image

      Genna East 6 years ago

      Eggs with spaghetti; that caused me to read through the recipe a second time. This is an unusual recipe, but one that has me intrigued. Well done.

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Mmm, yes Genna, I can see why it would cause you to do a double take, as it were :) Eggs, with spaghetti, doesn't sound right, and for some people, probably isn't! But I think it's something that my mum seems to like - I remember that when she'd made a particularly huge pan of spaghetti bolognaise, she would eat leftovers the next day with a fried egg on top! Classy lady, my mum :D (Actually, she is a very classy lady, but we all like to eat our comfort foods from time to time, do we not? :) )

      Linda.

    • midnightbliss profile image

      Haydee Anderson 6 years ago from Hermosa Beach

      surely never heard anything like this recipe before but it is very interesting. i love the way you write too. i'll be looking forward for more recipes.

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Oh, I've got many more recipes like this midnightbliss! All very easy, and all very lacking in imagination, nutrition and balance ;)

      Thanks for stopping by, and for the comment.

      Linda.

    • epigramman profile image

      epigramman 6 years ago

      ...well I have 'certainly' missed you - I love your new profile photo - and it was so very great to see you popping over with some comments (which I always love) and some wonderful answers too - and after reading this fun fun fun hub - I keep referring to that old adage - this woman could write about anything and she always does it so well too - you are a world class writer in my humble epi book and have always been one of my favorites - some people have to work at this craft we call writing - you just have it - and that makes you a true natural wonder .....

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Epi, you do always make me blush - you do have a gift for hyperbole when it comes to my writing you know ;)

      I've missed HubPages, and all of my favourite writers - that's you Epi! - but have been busy with my boys as it's been their half-term holiday. Exhausting, but fun. Now back to business. It's about time I contributed to this site again, I've been slacking! (It's also about time I did your faith in me some justice, and actually started producing something world class!)

      Love ya, Epi :D

      Linda.

    • Merlin Fraser profile image

      Merlin Fraser 6 years ago from Cotswold Hills

      As one of those smart asses that actually enjoys cooking with real ingredients. I'm wondering if I can recreate this famous dish of yours with real spaghetti in my equally famous fresh tomato onion and basil sauce.

      Not sure if even the Italians serve Eggs and Spaghetti in the same dish but someone out there may know different, other than your Mum that is....

      Have to admit that I am not a great fan of tinned spaghetti, I find it way overcooked, sqiddgy and tasteless. I used to have to eat it on toast when I was a kid.... It's what my Mum called Tea !

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Go for it! I am actually one of those smart asses too Merlin :D I even have fresh basil growing on my kitchen windowsill, oh yes - and I use it too!

      I'm also a quarter Italian, and I can tell you that they do not serve eggs and spaghetti in the same dish - this is purely my mother's invention (she's half Italian). She's an even better cook than me. But once in a while we like to be very lazy - hence this ridiculous dish. I think my mum might actually make it with instant mash sometimes (awful stuff!), when she's feeling extra lazy.

      Linda.

    • Merlin Fraser profile image

      Merlin Fraser 6 years ago from Cotswold Hills

      You got me on the Fresh Basil plant, I definately have a Black Thumb for plant life. Most successful was a tomato plant until I went on holiday. I left it in the bath with a cloth wick so it could soak up water.

      Stupid thing shot up three feet and fell over... I think it drowned !

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Where's me Tena Lady, again! I can't grow tomatoes, I'm too forgetful. They get to the stage where they need feeding and watering daily and I'm afraid I just don't remember to look after them. I've never harvested a single tomato yet, after about seven years of trying.

      I am actually embellishing somewhat with my basil plant - it's not the same basil plant I started with. In fact, I buy those little pots you can get, grow-your-own-herbs-on-yer-windowsill, and after I've used them once they die. I buy a new one every now and again.

    • Merlin Fraser profile image

      Merlin Fraser 6 years ago from Cotswold Hills

      'Tis true tomatoes do need TLC and before you start rushing arond saying "I'm a Tomato...I'm a Tomato; you have to remember that they spend their life with their feet in crap and suffer from black fly...

      Now your secret's well and truly out about the Basil plant, ever tried growing herbs from seed ? Even for fun ?

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      No, I haven't. Have you? I've always fancied a having a right big load of herbs outside my kitchen door, but I don't have a kitchen door. I do have a dining room door though, and a great big pot of herbs would set it off nicely. I would imagine that for the herbs to be plentiful all of the time, you would need to have lots of each variety? I think that's the problem - and the con - with those wee windowsill pots, once you've picked the leaves you need (enough for a very small scattering on a portion of food that's only big enough for a gerbil) you have to wait for weeks and weeks for it grow more leaves. You hate it for not growing fast enough, and that's why you accidentally on purpose forget to water it; in essence, you commit planticide, out of anger and frustration.

      A herb wheel, mmm, should I...?

    • Merlin Fraser profile image

      Merlin Fraser 6 years ago from Cotswold Hills

      Hi Linda,

      If you keep probing and asking leading questions like this you may penetrate my shield and find out that I am not the one man disaster area I pretend to be.

      Before divorcing I lived in a house with over 3 acres of land, huge vegetable garden, fruit cage, two greenhouses and a mixed orchard.

      Outside the back door was a scruffy concrete slab that I turned into a feature herb garden by picking up old chimney pots of different heights and sizes placed on bricks for drainage and arranged like a weird sculpture. The whole finished off with different coloured granite stone chips with a stepping stone path to the lawn beyond.

      One thing with herbs some of them are aggressive little buggers and will spread like wild fire if allowed so it’s always a good idea to keep them contained somehow. Plus of course it’s nice to keep them close to the kitchen.

      Basil was the exception, can’t remember but I think it’s a good companion plant to grow with tomatoes in a greenhouse, keeps black fly away, I think, but it also adds a pleasant alternative smell when you walk into the greenhouse. I always thought growing tomatoes smelled like cats pee....! Of course growing Basil and tomatoes together reminds you what a great combination they make in a fresh tomato sauce, and I’m not sure if there is a better taste experience than eating a tomato picked warm off the vine or the taste of anything home grown for that matter. Pity it’s such hard work humping all those barrow loads of manure, rotavating it in, cutting the grass and hedge etc. Those were my chores...

      Now I don’t even have a window box !

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Are you Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall? Greg Wallace? Nigel Slater? They all grow stuff and eat it.

      The chimney pot sculpture sounds wonderful. I have room for something like that, because I have a largeish patio (not 3 acres, like!) Perhaps I will keep an eye out for chimney pots - then I could hub about them :D I'm putting the herby sculpture on my list of things to do. Little did I know that this hub would create more jobs for myself!

      You must miss your 3 acres, despite not having to do the hard labour involved? Not even a window box now... :(

      My dad lives down the road from me - he grows lots of food, just in his garden. He's made raised beds and gets a good harvest of all kinds of veggies. Being his favourite (only) daughter I do benefit from his surplus fruit and veg mountains :) It's a small garden, but still he manages to grow pears, plums, blackberries, parsnips, onions, peppers, chillies, radish, broccoli, and some other things that I can't remember. He has more patience than I do.

    • Merlin Fraser profile image

      Merlin Fraser 6 years ago from Cotswold Hills

      Raised Beds are good too, with blue plastic water pipe you can make hoops, and cover in polythene or netting. Use straight sticks and with the hoops on top then the polythene, instant greenhouse...

      You are right gardening oes require patience and constant attention to detail, like watering, weeding and feeding but it does taste a lot better than anything out of shop.

      Of course in your case it must tastse twice as good cos someboby else does all the work... Way to go Gal !

      Do I miss it...? Yeah I suppose I do, we were more or less self sufficient in a lot of things and had a source of fresh veg for most of the year.

      But it was hard work and the down side is you will never ever get a holiday in the growing months. Plus of course it's always..Too Hot...Too Cold... Too Wet... Too Dry... Not sunny enought or scorching...

      As for recycled chimmey pots a local builder got them for me, every time he did a roof job... must have pissed off a few people ..."Sorry Love but the chimmney pot will have to be replaced... My mate needs them for his garden ."

    • kittythedreamer profile image

      Nicole Canfield 6 years ago from the Ether

      Lady Wordsmith - I have to say, it's lookin' pretty nasty, my friend! I am intrigued though...I may have to give it a shot. There may be some aversion to the dish after I make it though! Voted up and useful. Your hubs and ideas are truly unique and I love it!

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Hi Kitty. Well, I think that since you think it looks nasty, you will probably think it tastes so :) My partner is not as thrilled with it as I am, and only one of my three children will touch it (he's the one that will eat anything). You might call it an acquired taste - and not necessarily in a good way!

      Thanks for the votes, and the kind comment.

      Linda.

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Merlin, good news! I have tended to my tomatoes, and they are coming on nicely. I took them out of miniature greenhouse, because they were starting to try to break out. They're now languishing on my patio looking splendid. I fed them, with our very own 'home made' worm-wee fertiliser that our very own worms in the wormery made :) Now that they're in view every time I go into the garden, there's a good chance that I will remember to give them some attention.

      My peppers on the other hand ... not so good.

      Linda.

    • Merlin Fraser profile image

      Merlin Fraser 6 years ago from Cotswold Hills

      The great thing about gardening mistakes is there is always next year....!

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Yes. So, tomatoes this year, peppers next year. Thanks Merlin :)

    • profile image

      rorshak sobchak 6 years ago

      Another great write up Lady Wordsmith. Keep up the great work.

      rorshak sobchak

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Why, thank you Rorshak.

      Linda.

    • KaylaTheArtist profile image

      KaylaTheArtist 6 years ago

      Haha very creative. I enjoyed reading this. Although I think if I tried to eat that when I was sick it would make me sicker =P

    • Lady Wordsmith profile image
      Author

      Linda Rawlinson 6 years ago from Lancaster, UK

      Hi Kayla. You might be right about that, I'll not deny it, yes, it could well finish you off!

      Thanks for reading this silly hub :D

      Linda.

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