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2 Ways to Cook Corn On the Cob

Updated on June 30, 2020
Mickie Gee profile image

Mickie Gee is a retired librarian and a grandmother. She knows a little bit about a lot of topics. Life experiences are wonderful.

Find out how to cook corn in a pot on the stove or in your microwave:

Cooking Corn-on-the-cob does not have to be a big production! No need to call your mother, grandmother or aunts to get their opinions. All you need are (1) a big pot of boiling water, (2) a little salt and (3) shucked corn still on the cob. Plus, you need to bookmark this page so you will not forget how to boil that cob.

OR if you have a microwave, you are all set to eat corn on the cob in just 3-4 minutes! No pre-shucking involved! Find out how to use this method for cooking corn a little further down the page!

Again, on this page you will find two easy ways to cook corn on the cob. The first recipe is for cooking shucked ears of corn in boiling water. The second way to easily cook corn on the cob IN the husk is in a microwave. (BTW, if you want to grill your corn, there are links to recipes at the bottom of the page.)

I will concede that how one cooks fresh summertime corn is a personal preference. I am constantly changing my mind about which method is my favorite. One thing I am certain of is that you will find the 2 ways to cook corn that I have featured here are very easy, indeed. Added bonus--they are pretty darn quick, too.

photo credit: DavidDennisPhotos.com via photopin cc

I love the blog, Food52, and I want to share their super easy, foolproof way to cook fresh corn on the cob. You should find the time to visit this website anyway to view the delicious looking photos as well as browse some really terrific recipes. I constantly find at least one new recipe I want to try on each visit.

Food52's method for cooking corn on the cob is definitely NOT confusing nor difficult. I dare you to try this recipe and be amazed.

(Hand shucking corn image found on Allposters.com)

Serving Size

Serves: 6

Ingredients

  • 6 shucked ears of fresh corn on the cob
  • Large pot of boiling water
  • salt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Carefully, drop ears of corn one at a time into the boiling water. When the water returns to a boil, put on the lid (if no lid, use a round cookie sheet or pizza pan) and turn off the heat.
  2. Let the ears sit for a few minutes (Olathe corn should only sit for 1 minute, btw!) or keep the ears in the pot until the rest of the dinner is ready.
  3. After draining the corn, enjoy your easy side dish with butter and salt to taste,
Cast your vote for How to Cook Corn in a pot of boiling water:

How to easily cook corn on the cob in a Microwave: - Some of us do not have a big kitchen!

What if you do not have a stove or a grill on which to cook your corn on the cob? Do you just have a microwave but you still want to eat that fresh summer corn on the cob? Then watch this video that demonstrates how to cook corn without shucking and removing all that silk beforehand.

I have used the method shown in this video many times and it really does work and one gets a perfectly cooked ear of corn.

No recipe required. Just remember these steps:

(1) Put unshucked ear of corn in the microwave;

(2) Cook one ear for 3 minutes on HIGH;

(3) Using an oven mitt to hold the hot corn, cut off the each end of the cob and then shake, shake, shake. Some pulling might be needed, too.

Just watch this short video to see how easy it is to cook corn in a microwave.

Easy. Easy!

Corn Cob Cooking and Eating Essentials: - Great corn cooking and eating products on Amazon.com

Well, you do not have to have all the items below, but you really should have a big pot! The other items are just extras that would be nice to have around. Since I already own a pot similar to the one shown, my favorite for eating corn on the cob would be the Fiesta "tray". I guess they could not call it a "corn on the cob dish" because your can use it to serve other foods as well, like olives and pickles.

All of the shown opinions of the Amazon products are mine. However, all you have to do is click on the corny products below to visit Amazon and read what others consumers have to say. I try to carefully choose the items I feature.

Cuisinart 77-412P1 Piece 12-Quart Chef's-Classic-Stainless-Cookware-Collection, Pasta/Steamer Set (4-Pc.)
Cuisinart 77-412P1 Piece 12-Quart Chef's-Classic-Stainless-Cookware-Collection, Pasta/Steamer Set (4-Pc.)
I have a very beat up pot similar to this. Need a new one, btw. I like the large basket insert because you can cook a lot of cobs and lift them all out and drain them in the same gadget. Very useful for cooking pasta, too.
 

Poll: What is the best way to get the silk off a fresh ear of corn still in the husk? - Corn silk can be a problem. I hate getting it stuck in my teeth.

Corn silk can be a nuisance. I have never used any purchased gadget as I have heard that most of them do not work very well.

Here is your chance to tell how you remove the corn silk before you cook it. Share your knowledge, y'all.

How do you get the silk off fresh corn on the cob? If you know of another way to get the silk off that is not mentioned, share it by leaving a comment.

See results

Did you find the corn on the cob recipe your were looking for?

Maybe you want to grill that ear of corn!

During the long, hot southern summer, my husband and I sometimes choose to cook our unshucked corn on the outdoor BBQ grill. So easy. Just put the corn with husks and all on the grill for 30 minutes. Turn the corn when you turn your meat. As a result you have a delicious side dish and no dirty pots to wash.

If you need more details on how to cook your corn on a BBQ grill, then please visit the following article here on Hubpages:

BBQ Side Dishes: Hot Off the Grill Barbecue Ideas

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I appreciate your visit to my page about cooking fresh corn on the cob!

If you are dying to make a corny comment, please do so below. Thanks again for your visit.

So here is the last question, "What do you put on your cooked fresh corn on the cob?"

Pepper and Salt; butter? There is a wonderful restaurant in our town that puts chili powder on their corn. Really! I actually put nothing on mine. I think there is nothing so lovely as a fresh, hot cob with big fat kernels.

Thanks again for participating and liking my "Cooking Corn on The Cob" recipe page.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2012 Mickie Gee

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