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Making Your Own Onion Salt And Chives

Updated on July 10, 2016
MBurgess profile image

Gardening is my second passion. I love to watch seed turn to living plant and flower evolve into an edible thing. Spring enchants me.

Layed Onion Chives And Salt In Jar - Image: M Burgess
Layed Onion Chives And Salt In Jar - Image: M Burgess

Organic Seasonings From Garden Cuttings

Making your own onion salt at home is simple and cost effective. The results are an organic seasoning made for pennies on the dollar. I love making my own homemade items because I know exactly what the ingredients are. This recipe is ideal for anyone living a frugal or organic lifestyle.

I preserve cuttings from these aromatic plants found in my garden and make my own organic seasoning out of them. Growing them myself insures they are truly organic. There are two ways I use to preserve onions - dried chives and onion salt.

If you grow them in your yard you can top the plants and have fresh seasoning for cooking meats, stews, stir fry, and soups even chili. If you don't have a garden, you can still make these seasonings using scallions from the produce section at your local market.

Reuse old canning lids and jars or refill an old spice jar with this easy recipe.

Onion Salt Directions

You will need iodized salt, fresh cut onion chives, and a pint jar.

1 - Use a layer of salt about 3/4" thick in the bottom of the jar.

2 - Add about 3 tablespoons of fresh chopped onion chives just enough to cover the lower layer of salt.

3 - Pour salt on top of the chives layer and repeat until you have either used the chives you cut or are at the top of the jar.

Let this mixture sit for about 4 days before disturbing it. The salt will be clumped around the onion pieces. From here you can mix it up by rolling the jar around or stir it up with a fork to break up the salt.

If you would like to grind down the onion tops in a mortar and pestle wait until they are fully dried out and then put them back into the jar.

Mix well and add to your favorite recipes!

Dry Onion Chives

Dry onion cuttings on foil or on a glass plate. Wax paper may also be used. When fully dried, onion greens may be ground into a fine powder.
Dry onion cuttings on foil or on a glass plate. Wax paper may also be used. When fully dried, onion greens may be ground into a fine powder.

Onions in the garden

Here are more ways to cultivate onions from kitchen to garden planting.

Onion Sprouting in the Kitchen? - Onions Make Great Companion Plants!

Seeing green in the kitchen onion collection? Bury it in the garden. It fights pests and can be trimmed within weeks. They make nice companion plants.
Seeing green in the kitchen onion collection? Bury it in the garden. It fights pests and can be trimmed within weeks. They make nice companion plants.

Root Onion Starts - Onion Cuttings Grow Again

The root end of an onion may be used to start onion chives. They will start growing within days of planting. Keep moist and the greens will show soon!
The root end of an onion may be used to start onion chives. They will start growing within days of planting. Keep moist and the greens will show soon!
Green Onions In Containers - Image: M Burgess
Green Onions In Containers - Image: M Burgess

Topping Onion Plants

Rinse In Cool Water

Top onion plants to about 6" from the white stalk. The greens are then placed in a strainer to wash off the dirt and anything else that may have accumulated on the tube-like leaves. Trim away any of the dried brown tips and toss these.

When the tops been have thoroughly rinsed in cool water, take a paper towel and blot gently to dry them off. Handle them with a light touch so they are not bruised. From here they will be placed on a cutting board for slicing.

Cut the greens in sections about 1/2" wide. The chives can then be set out to dry or layered in salt.

Don't worry about taking cuttings. Onion chives grow back quickly in their growing season. Mine spring right up to trimming length in about 10 days. Top them every 2 weeks and they will keep growing back.

These stragglers are plants that survived winter so I know they are strong willed. The more pungent the onion the better your salt will be. The oils will absorb into the salt and be a great seasoning.

(Onions 2013 window box planting)

Onion - Grow Them Yourself

Growing onions is one of the first things you can do if you are a new gardener. This is an easy plant to grow yourself. Taking time to make sure they are in soil that is never dry is the key to good growing and achieving that green thumb. Sprinkle seeds onto garden soil and keep watered and onions pretty much take care of themselves. An added plus is they repel bugs.

When sprouting these tiny seeds, mist the soil until they are strong seedlings, then water them gently. They root well once established.

Onion Chives - Seedling Onions

Onions in their early growth stages are chives. When they thicken up a bit they are scallions.
Onions in their early growth stages are chives. When they thicken up a bit they are scallions.

Garlic Chives - Heirloom Garlic Seeds

This year's herb plantings include heirloom garlic seeds from my Mother's garden. These fine hairs will thicken eventually and become greens.
This year's herb plantings include heirloom garlic seeds from my Mother's garden. These fine hairs will thicken eventually and become greens.

By utilizing the greens on a live growing onion you can have fresh seasonings to use in your cooking. This technique can be applied to garlic as well if you want to make your own garlic salts. Making it yourself is healthier for you and your family and it is a fun project that will save you money!

Guestbook Comments - And Review

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    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @poutine: Thanks Poutine!

    • profile image

      poutine 

      5 years ago

      Cool idea for utilizing your own grown onions.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Dabdab: You are quite welcome, Dabdab! And you don't have to dig up the onions. Just trim the tops back to about 6" from the white section and use those. The onions will grow back more tops QUICKLY! Its not going to hurt them at all. =) Thanks for stopping in and dropping a few comments!

    • Dabdab profile image

      Dabdab 

      5 years ago

      I have never tried onion salt! I don't know why because it sounds like a delicious idea. I have some spring onions in my veggie patch so I will dig some up tomorrow and have a go. Thanks.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @maryseena: You are welcome! It is easy and best of all - it is very tasty! =) Thanks for your visit! =)

    • maryseena profile image

      maryseena 

      5 years ago

      I have to try this! Sounds so easy and practical. Thank you.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @lesliesinclair: Wish I had a *like* button for comments... Thanks for visiting!

    • lesliesinclair profile image

      lesliesinclair 

      5 years ago

      Wow, you make it so easy to do this. Even makes nice gifts.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Cynthia Haltom: Thank you chaltom! It is fun, very economical, and easy peasy! =) Thank you for stopping by and taking time to comment!

    • Cynthia Haltom profile image

      Cynthia Haltom 

      5 years ago from Diamondhead

      Great idea. I love to cook and will have to try this recipe myself. I didn't know how to make onion salt before I read your lens, how clever of you!

    • Corrinna-Johnson profile image

      Corrinna Johnson 

      5 years ago from BC, Canada

      I love this idea and I am going to try making some onion and chive salt this summer. Looks super easy to make and with very little cost. Much better than the store bought variety which is packed full of preservatives and comes with a ridiculous price tag.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @katiecolette: Thanks for visiting and for your comments!

    • katiecolette profile image

      katiecolette 

      5 years ago

      @MBurgess: Yes, I agree, they grow back so fast! I have been using chives in just about every meal I make. Love how chives enhance the flavor of homemade meals.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @Elyn MacInnis: Thanks for the visit!

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @craftblogger lm: Thanks for the share, visit, and comment! Seriously -- they do grow back fast! The ones I cut not even a week ago are ready for harvest again. Thanks for visiting and the pin! =)

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @SusanDeppner: Thanks Susan! This can be done in a ziplock, too if that makes it any easier. The chives can be crushed right in the bag once they are dried. Thanks so much for your visit!

    • Elyn MacInnis profile image

      Elyn MacInnis 

      5 years ago from Shanghai, China

      Good idea! I love garlic shoots. We eat them in all sorts of dishes in China in the spring.

    • MBurgess profile imageAUTHOR

      Maria Burgess 

      5 years ago from Las Vegas, Nevada

      @aesta1: It is a lot easier than cutting up an onion and the tears that go with it! Thanks for the visit and comment aesta! =)

    • craftblogger lm profile image

      craftblogger lm 

      5 years ago

      What a great use for the chives we have growing in our garden. Thank you! Sharing this on Pinterest.

    • SusanDeppner profile image

      Susan Deppner 

      5 years ago from Arkansas USA

      What a wonderful idea! Homemade onion salt would be so good. Must try this!

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      I like onion salt and chives. It adds more flavour to most things.

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