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Bipolar Disorder in Children: Does It Exist ?

Updated on February 23, 2013
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As I watched a video about children with bipolar disorder, I learned about a child named Jacob that was diagnosed with ADHD and was prescribed Ritalin. He was given more and more medication. As he was given more and more medication, he was diagnosed with having aggressive behavior. As this happened, as he was growing older and older, he was diagnosed with a mood disorder. The doctors started giving him more and more medication. As a result of this, he was hospitalized. Eventually, the doctors diagnosed him with bipolar disorder. Since, this has happened more frequently in society, the question stands does bipolar disorder really exist.


My personal opinion is that bipolar disorder does not exist. I feel that the exponential amount of medicine that the doctors give children causes mood swings and aggressive behavior. I also feel that a child’s environment and upbringing also has a lot to do with the way that they behave. I think that the doctors should not be giving young children these medications. I feel that a child’s brain is not fully developed yet and that the medication is making the situation worse. The side effects of the medication can greatly damage a child by causing excessive eating and drooling. Also, I think the side effects could even possibly hinder a child’s speech, behavior, and physical development as they are growing up. A child can experience depression and anger as well. In the video, Jacob’s parents speak about how there weren’t alternate solutions to help control Jacob’s behavior. I think the fact that there weren’t alternate solutions is not a good thing. The fact that these two year olds and four year olds are being diagnosed as having bipolar disorder is absolutely ridiculous. I feel that maybe even the doctors are trying to say this, in order to try to help the young but also by continuously making more and more money. These doctors are making a lot of money by telling someone that they are ill or unstable and prescribing medicine as they feel is necessary.


I strongly disbelieve in the fact that these medicines should be prescribed to these young children. I think that these children should be given alternative treatments such as therapy. The fact that these doctors are diagnosing these children as if they are adults is absolutely ridiculous. These doctors are acting as if these children are adults that are psychotic or have a mental deficiency. I think that these medications should no longer be prescribed to these children. I think that these doctors are wrong in diagnosing these children at such a young age. I feel that there should be an age limit maybe even the age of 18 before a doctor necessarily diagnoses a child as having something such as ADHD, ADD, or bipolar disorder. Even at the age of 17 with parent consent I would consider the minimal age for a child to be diagnosed with such a disorder. The fact that these doctors continue to prescribe these medicines that causes ticks, nausea, and alternative moods is truly affecting each and every child that is diagnosed. The fact that a four year old was even diagnosed is just so absurd to me and I feel that these doctors need to re-evaluate what the signs and symptoms of bipolar disorder actually are. The doctors should allow these children to become of a necessary age before they are diagnosed and they should only be allowed to monitor the children as they grow older.



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In my opinion, there are alternative treatments for these children other than automatically prescribing them strong doses of medication such as Ritalin. An alternative method to a child acting unlike themselves should be to let them be more creative in writing, drawing, or necessarily just being a child. I’m saying that these children should be allowed to express themselves, in order to help with their behavior. Another alternative treatment would be to try therapy for these children. I feel that if a child is allowed to speak about how they feel and why they act the way that they act, then the problems that they have may be solve. Also, a child could also speak with their parents on why they are acting the way they are acting and why they are being aggressive towards objects or other people. The communication that the child has with his parent might allow them to behave in a more suitable manner. Even the environment might have an effect on a child and the way that they act. The environment may consist of being around other kids that are acting in an aggressive way or watching a show that shows violence. I think that a child’s environment should be limited to only watching certain shows that doesn’t show violence or interacting with kids that are showing aggressive behavior.


In conclusion, as I watched the video about the children I learned a lot about the medicine that these children are prescribed and how they are being diagnosed. The fact that a five year old was diagnosed as having adult signs and symptoms was just unbelievable. I believe that these doctors may even be misdiagnosing these children. I think that these children that are experiencing adult like signs and symptoms should be diagnosed with something other than ADHD and bipolar disorder. As I said before, I think that these certain children should only be monitored and should not be given medicine right away. The medication may be too strong for a child and could possibly backfire for the symptoms of the child to become worse than they were before. Overall, I think that bipolar disorder does not exist in small child; I do however think that bipolar disorder may exist in adults. I think this way because I believe that as you grow, your brain matures, and you began to think, smell, see, taste, and act differently than you were before. These children should not be given these medications because they are young and still growing. In the video, the side effects of being given these medications can include overeating, drooling, ticks, more aggressive behavior, speech impediment, and mental problems. These side effects are worse than what these children are being diagnosed with. The fact that these doctors are not considering alternative treatments is ridiculous. These doctors should try therapy or there should be communication between the child, their parents, and even the doctors if necessary. The environment of the child should also be closely monitored and should be considered a factor of a child’s behavior, before any diagnosis or medication is made.


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    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 2 years ago

      @Audrey thanks for pinning and im glad that you like my hub. Meds aren't the answer to anything and sometimes alternatives should be considered instead. Blessings to you.

    • brakel2 profile image

      Audrey Selig 2 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Torri- It is hard to figure the answer to this one. It is true that meds seem to be the answer to everything in life. Of course they are not, but they are prescribed too much. They often are not cures but patches for symptoms. Other options need considering. If a child has issues, often changes in diet or lifestyle can help. Of course, in serious cases, experts can help with other options, sometimes medication. Great article. Pinning Blessings, Audrey

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 3 years ago

      @tamarawilhite thanks for the feedback!

    • tamarawilhite profile image

      Tamara Wilhite 4 years ago from Fort Worth, Texas

      Bipolar disorder exists in adults. Perhaps 1% suffer from mood swings from high to low, manic to depressed, because of deteriorating emotional regulation biochemistry in the brain. Lithium partially provides relief from some of these sufferers. However, bipolar mood disorders typically emerge in adolescence or early adulthood - not childhood.

      Too many kids are slapped with a bipolar disorder diagnosis when the actual problems are: lack of discipline, lack of supervision, children acting out in response to a broken home, teachers who cannot/will not discipline those throwing tantrums, unwillingness to restrain and retrain children who think violence is an acceptable way to demonstrate displeasure and a failure to teach self-control.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @MarshaMusselman1 thanks for finding my mistake ! I will be sure to correct that as soon as possible. And thanks for your feedback, much appreciated.

    • Marsha Musselman1 profile image

      Marsha Musselman 4 years ago from Michigan, USA

      I don't agree that young children of ages two and four can have a conversation with their parents about how and why they feel or act the way they do. I'm sure they won't have a clue about that until they get much older.

      I believe young children can have bi-polar disorder, especially if mood swings are present. I'm talking about mood swings that are different than the common tantrums that young children are well-known for.

      I agree with you that Ritalin is overused for children today. Oftentimes instead of using medication for hyperactive children another option is to wean out certain foods and dyes or food color's used in foods, which has been found to cause many of the problems associated with hyperactive children.

      In one of your paragraphs you said that you didn't believe in bi-polar disorder at all when I think you meant that you didn't believe children could have it. You did state that already in several places, so I don't know for sure if that what you meant or not.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @MrsBrownsParlour I agree that medications should be used as a last resort and that other treatments should be used instead. thanks for the positive feedback and Im glad that you found my article interesting.

    • MrsBrownsParlour profile image

      Lurana Brown 4 years ago from Chicagoland, Illinois

      Interesting, controversial topic! I have more than one family member with bi-polar disorder so I'm familiar with it...and one of them had severe behavior problems as a child. Anecdotal evidence can go either way. Early intervention of any disorder is a good thing. But your points about behavioral and alternative treatments instead of prescription drugs are great. Medications have side effects and influence children's developing brains. I personally think more recess and less enforced sitting would solve a lot of "attention deficit" issues---children need to be active; it helps with brain development!! It's hard to know what these parents and children are going through and what their pediatricians have told them, but I agree that medications should always be a last resort.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @Escobana thanks for the feedback well appreciated

    • Escobana profile image

      Escobana 4 years ago from Valencia

      I very much wonder about the video you've seen. It would be great to add the video to your Hub and I wonder why you are so strong in your opinion about Bipolar Disoder?

      When you write in the beginning of your Hub that you believe this disorder doesn't exist, I almost choked. I'm glad you rephrase that in the end and link your opinion to this disorder in children.

      I am Bipolar and I was a normal child. I wasn't a normal teenager or adult and I am glad I got diagnosed the right way. I have very good medication that work for me in such a way that my quality of life is excellent.

      I do agree with you that heavy medication and young children don't mix well but I wonder if you 'know' how awful it is to be locked up inside your head.

      It must be worse to experience that as a child and communicating about your feelings is hard enough as an adult, let alone as a child. Your ideas of fixing things without medication seem understandable but they seem very far off reality.

      Doctors don't 'just' prescribe or 'just' diagnose to earn big money. Reality is that if children have serious mental issues that need to be diagnosed in order to find the right treatment, they'll have a long road ahead of them.

      The road to solutions will be very tough since I know even as an adult it is an absolute horror to be diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder in order to search for the right meds.

      One other important comment I have to make....in the States I see a big difference in the mental health system compared to Holland. Doctors are very reluctant to diagnose just like that, simply to avoid medication from the beginning.

      That's why my opinion on this is more positive because doctors really care for the young and older, trying to find the best solution for each personal problematic mental health situation.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @Bishop55 thanks for your comment i guess i agree somewhat with you that meds should be used as a last result. and thanks for voting up

    • Bishop55 profile image

      Rebecca 4 years ago from USA

      I do agree with you about giving young children medications, but I do think that medication has it's place for treating illness. Children should be prescribed medications as a last resort, or after exhausting all other avenues. I've read that a brain does not reach full development until the age of 25, and this makes sense. Polluting it with drugs (which is what medications are) can retard the correct growth and development of the human brain, and hurt emotional growth as well. A lot of behavior issues in children have also been linked to food allergies. I like your views on this topic. I have step children, 1 we have fulltime because his bio mother is using Meth. We've stabelized his surroundings, and I would not medicate him until trying all other avenues first. He has been to therapy and lately we've been thinking about taking him back. For the most part, he is a really great little kid who didn't ask for his situation, and doping him up on pills against his will (I say against his will since he is a minor and really wouldn't understand the full implications or have a full vote) is not going to happen unless absolutely necessary. The problem with letting kids express how they feel is that a lot of times they don't know how they feeeeeeel, and they can't dissect or properly interrupt adult issues (hell, half the time I can't and I'm almost 34). They don't know why they do the things they do when they are emotionally upset, so guidance, caring parents and therapy are an absolute MUST for children displaying odd behavior. Nice hub. I enjoyed reading it. Voted up.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      Hi Sondra,

      I appreciate your comment and the feedback with regards to children being diagnosed as being bipolar even though they shouldn't be. I agree with you 100 percent.

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      SparrowMinistries 4 years ago

      Hi Torrilynn,

      Thanks for reading my hub "Life's problems, does it help to talk about it?" and for leaving a comment! It is greatly appreciated. I came by to check out one of your hubs and this one certainly caught my eye. As a former child protective services worker, I have seen this phenomenon go on with foster children at an alarming rate. It is horrible what the "system" does to kids in the name of "protecting" them. While there are times when children really do need to be rescued, I think it needs to be weighed much more carefully against what the "the State" can really offer them in exchange. Also I do believe there is such a disorder as bipolar, but it is much, much more rare than it is diagnosed ESPECIALLY with children. It didn't use to be allowed in the DSM to diagnose a child with things like bipolar or schizophrenia. I agree that children should never be diagnosed with bipolar and medication should be last resort, not the initial intervention. If a child is having difficulty, they need to be "set up for success" in their home and school environment. It is possible but it means work for the adults in the child's life and that means sacrifice. How sad that we would rather give them a dangerous drug than to take care of them properly. I appreciate your sensitivity to this subject and wish you all the best in your writing and educational endeavors!

      Blessings,

      Sondra

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @JaneHolmes

      Thanks for the feedback

      and for sharing your

      story with me on meds and

      the kids that really needed them.

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      Jane Holmes 4 years ago

      I agree with your hub in many ways. We've worked with many children over the years and certainly agree that medications are used much too quickly, And, I agree that they can take a child from a minor problem into something more serious. However, I have known children that were bi-polar from the start and needed some medicating. We were always ones to fight for lesser meds - as little as possible to combat the situation. When a child is completely out of control they need help somehow. Some of them we could work with without meds but others need them. It's a tough call to make. All meds are a two edges sword. A great hub that brings a big concern out for people to consider.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @Eiddwen thanks for the positive feedback, i appreciate it alot.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      Very interesting ;well informed and useful to many I am sure. Have a great day.

      Eddy.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @kittythedreamer thanks for the feedback and these children shouldn't be given meds. When I was younger, my cousin was diagnosed with being ADHD and was prescribed a lot of meds. The medicine made her moody and her behavior became worse from time to time of being on the meds. I felt then she shouldn't be on the meds but my aunt did as she saw fit. She was only trying to help her daughter not hurt her and believed that she was helping her daughter by listening to what the doctor said

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @ExoticHippieQueen i agree with you that any normal child being raised in a negative environment may become bipolar however even in that case i still don't think meds should be given or even administered at a young age sometimes even if a normal kid or a kid who is mentally challenged grew up in a positive environment with a supportive family they still can be bipolar as you have mentioned i figure that it all comes down to other variables such as location age stimulants sounds that may or may not offset the child being bipolar. All in all, it may have nothing to do with other variables and is something that the child will have to learn to live with as they get older. In your particular situation, I'm sorry for the ordeal that you have had to go through and I wish nothing but the best for you and your family in the future.

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      ExoticHippieQueen 4 years ago

      In the case of nurture vs. nature, I can assure you that my daughter was loved deeply and was raised in a stable, loving home by two parents who were experienced and committed to giving her the best care. Nature won, despite all of our best efforts. Yes, abused children will certainly fall to being influenced by their environment when it is a negative environment, but a positive environment does not equal a well child when it comes to bipolar. Any "normal" child may end up in a psych ward if they are being tortured, abused or neglected.

    • kittythedreamer profile image

      Nicole Canfield 4 years ago from the Ether

      I don't think children should be given any psych meds; however, being that I grew up with a bipolar mother, I can say for certain that bipolar disorder does indeed exist. You are right, though. With children, the issue is most of the time how the parents are raising that child. Many of the most disturbed children that can be found in the psych units of a hospital are the children who have been abused or totally neglected by their parents...kids need love and rules and structure...not meds. Great topic!

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @ExoticHippieQueen yes i feel the same as you do that there hasn't been a proper assessment on how to diagnose the disorder it almost feels like the doctors are playing some sort of guessing game the false confidence that they give to parents after years of giving their child medication that isn't helping is quite pathetic and disgusting. They know whats going on and they should at least talk with the parent on whether or not the child will get better or continuously get worse. I feel offering a nutritional aspect to the situation such as Omega 3's that you have suggested may help significantly with the child and is far better than medications such as ritalin, prozac, etc.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @midget38 yeah the actual existence of bipolar disorder in children is an iffy subject and yeah the parents listen to the doctors and think that quick medication will solve the problem not realizing they are making the problem worse.

    • midget38 profile image

      Michelle Liew 4 years ago from Singapore

      I wouldn't know whether to believe or disbelieve in the existence of bipolar disorder, but what you say about over medicating, especially in the area of mental health is too true. Parents are so worried especially if their children are diagnosed with having mental issues that they want to eliminate the problem quickly by putting their child on lots of medicine. Amazing share.

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      ExoticHippieQueen 4 years ago

      I understand where you're coming from, torrilynn. I do agree with you on disliking large amounts of medication, or possibly any medication at all at that age. I guess my point of argument is that bipolar in children does exist. It seems, though, there is some confusion as how best to diagnose it at such a young age. I cannot see giving any medication to such young, developing brains, but possibly approach it from a nutritional standpoint with high Omega 3's, which has shown promise in adults to a minor degree.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @ExoticHippieQueen i really appreciate the feedback and how you personally had to deal with your child and the behaviors that came along with it her being bipolar. I feel you are right in the fact that children shouldnt be given medication at an early age and that early detection is best. however, my main point was that doctors were prescribing large doses of medication to 3 and 4 year olds. I guess in a way im on the fence now after you have told your own story and how you feel about the disorder from your own perspective since you had to deal with it personally.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @nellrose yes i feel that thorough work to trying to figure out what is wrong is best to see for certain on whether or not if the children actually has a mental problem. Thanks for your feedback.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @aviannovice i completely agree with you in the sense that these children should be monitored and that finding out the true root of the problem is best.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 4 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Chemicals and children do not mix. Alternative remedies are better, yet all of these must be properly monitored. We must also determine what is causing these major problems in these kids before we adopt these procedures for handling them, too. Sugar intake and allergic reactions can raise the devil with anyone's system if they are allergic, or even diabetic, for that matter.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

      Hi, I know that adults do have bipolar, my brother has it, but to be honest I am not sure at what age it starts. I do agree with you that doctors should take a look at the whole picture of the child before giving medication, there are so many factors to look at first, great hub, nell

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      ExoticHippieQueen 4 years ago

      Well, torrilynn, I have a 22 year old daughter who has bipolar disorder, so I have a unique perspective as someone who has lived through it, not just giving an opinion. My daughter was adopted by my husband and myself when she was 7 months old. Prior to that, I knew of her. She was loved, but not taken care of very well. Her mother probably had the disorder as well. By the time we were able to get her, she was a defiant baby, something I had not seen before. I had 3 biological children of my own, as well as years as a daycare provider and babysitter, and a grandchild, too. She was a different baby who grew into a difficult toddler and preschooler. Her terrible two's were worse than most. We were in the bookstore, holding her in our arms when she was two, looking for books to help us. My other children were not like her, just the normal terrible two's. Even at age 1, she often seemed angry, and would bang her toys on the coffee table and throw them across the room. By preschool, her teacher was contacting me about her behavior. As a kindergardener, she was the first girl at the school to ever be sent to the principal at that young of an age. She fought with other children, and slammed doors if she didn't get her way at 6. Screaming fits were common. In first grade, she was evaluated for ADD and was diagnosed. I refused medication in first grade, but by third grade, I agreed. At first, it seemed to help, but as time went on, the medication had no effect on her. Her most common problems were lying, destruction of property, fighting with everyone over everything and that kind of thing. Puberty (age 13) brought on some of her worst behaviors, and at that time, she had a psychotic episode and was diagnosed with B/P, which I could not believe, so she was hospitalized for two weeks for further evaluation. Still, the diagnosis came back B/P with additional pending diagnoses which included oppositional defiance disorder, reactive attachment disorder, narcissistic personality disorder and ADD. Several disorders would wait until she turned 18 when she would be reevaluated. At 15, we had to place her in a residential school to protect herself from her destructive behaviors. Prior to that, she was on many medication trials, in therapy with everybody that would listen, and all failed. Completely failed. She would walk past the pill on the counter after the first week or two, and refuse to take it. Refuse to work with the counselors, hated them all. Ran away from school, from home. So literally hundreds of nights I stayed awake to go to the police station and report her missing, or wait for a county sheriff to stop in at 2 a.m. and take my missing report. It depended on whether she disappeared from school or home. She signed herself out of the school at 18, and has gone on to have a turbulent, chaotic, unstable adult life. She is the mother of 2, having given birth just 2 weeks ago. She has been homeless many times. We have tried living together many times, always ending up in violence, and a few times, with police involvement, so I cannot do that anymore. While I don't approve of 2 or 4 year olds taking meds because some doctors hop on the bandwagon of whatever is popular to do at the time, and many don't have the common sense God gave a gerbil, I do believe that early intervention is very, very important. If only we had known earlier that our daughter was predisposed to this disorder, we would have gotten her started on therapies at an earlier age,and been able to understand what was happening to our lives. Yes, I do believe that bipolar disorder exists in children. They do not just wake up one day at 13, which is the normal age area for onset, and just present with bipolar. The stage is usually set for many years prior with unmanageable behaviors and lots and lots of heartache. I wrote a poem about her but I don't want to give the name because I don't want to be penalized for self-promoting.

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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @moonlake im glad that you agree as i do. I would think that as a doctor they would want to try a less harmful approach to the situation by offering therapy but instead they jump right to medication. I feel that sometimes doctors will go as far as prescribing medication for the smallest of symptoms that only after a while cause other symptoms that werent there before. Overall, i find this whole situation ridiculous and im furious that this is still going on matter of fact that it is increasing at a steady rate.

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      moonlake 4 years ago from America

      I have seen children that are just brats and they seem to think they have bipolar disorder and lot of the problem, parents that can't say no the kids get in school and think they're going to run the show.

      I know grown-ups that have bipolar disorder and you would have not known it when they were young. They acted like normal children but when they became adults something just seem to go wrong.

      A family member was just called in by the school, the teachers wanted to put both his children on medication. I know these children they do not need medication. He and his wife told them no way they weren't going to do that. I just don't understand all the medication for kids.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @DDE im glad that you liked my article i felt that it was important to share with others thanks for voting up

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @Alastar Packer im glad that you feel the same way as i do. I just wish that more parents will start realizing that the doctors do not know what is best for your children all of the time. This situation is definitely one of those times.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @sheri faye thank you so much for the positive feedback, i feel that if we give children space or at least help them to direct that extra energy by participating in sports or painting can greatly help them with their behavior instead of just going straight to giving them meds that will damage them

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @billybuc, im glad that you appreciate and understand the way i feel how doctors can take diagnosis too far especially in young children whose minds are still developing. These meds can greatly damage their development and alter their behavior in a way we have never seen before.

    • torrilynn profile image
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      torrilynn 4 years ago

      @donnah75 i really appreciate the feedbak and its great to know that you feel the same as i do. Im glad to know that there are parents are out there who knows that putting their kids in a ton of meds will only make the situation worse. I hope more parents realize this in the future.

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      Donna Hilbrandt 4 years ago from Upstate New York

      Giving medication to such young children is insane! As a teacher, I see discussions about this topic a lot. In my experience, some doctors have said that conditions such as bipolar disorder can't be properly diagnosed until a person becomes an adult. A great moment was when I was in a meeting about a student. It was suggested to the mom that she take her child in to be looked at for ADHD and whether or not he might need meds. She said, "absolutely not! I am not going to fill my kid with drugs. He can go outside and run off his energy." I wanted to hug that mom. I think that alternative methods need to be looked at before any doctor or parent starts to medicate a growing child. Often, I think changes in diet might help. A healthier, less sugary, less chemically altered diet could be the key to helping a lot of kids. Great article, which I hope will get some people thinking. Voted up.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      I agree completely. We live in a society today that thinks medication is the cure for all things, including parenting. :) We weaken our immune systems by medicating, and at a young age it can have very adverse effects. Good job on this one; very important message.

    • Sheri Faye profile image

      Sheri Dusseault 4 years ago from Chemainus. BC, Canada

      I agree with you here. There may be the odd child who needs medication but most of them likely just need firmer boundaries. All kids will try to push the limits and all kids have tantrums and need to learn to control there emotions. Great hub!

    • Alastar Packer profile image

      Alastar Packer 4 years ago from North Carolina

      I'm in agreement with your feelings on this matter torrilynn. Far too many children are prescribed those heavy duty meds such as Ritalin. Mother Nature has a most wondrous way of healing if given time. Don't know if it's true or not but saw where the plan is to have half of American children on these types meds before too long- a real prescription for disaster if you ask me. Votes up and useful torri.

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      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      You right about the effects of medication on Bipolar Disorder in Children, and sounds like a new discovery. I have learned something new here. Voted up!