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How to Make Rose Water?

Updated on July 12, 2013

The sweet smell of roses has long captivated people the world over. It is the choice for gifts and rose oil has been a popular ingredient in perfumes. Rose water or Gulab in Indian is the by-product of the production of rose oil that is used in perfumes. It’s use dates back to Ancient civilizations and the Victorian Era and it is believed that Cleopatra, perhaps the most famous woman in history used rose water in her baths to seduce her lover Anthony. Rose water is used as food flavoring for Indian, Iranian, and Turkish cuisine. It is added to ice cream, tea, and even cookies in Iran and other Arab nations. It is also used as cleansing water in different religious ceremonies especially with Muslims and Hindu. In fact, during the podium celebration of the Bahrain and Abu Dhabi Grand Prix, rose water is used as a replacement for the traditional champagne because of alcohol prohibitions in the country. But, these days it is used for cosmetic preparations not only because of its lovely scent but also because of its light astringent properties. It is often used as a toner for dry skin and in some creams as well. The good news is you can make this good and sweet smelling recipe in your own home.

How To Make Rose Water Steps

There are a couple of things to consider before starting this simple recipe.

  1. First, you have to make sure that roses are freshly picked. It is best if they are grown in your own backyard to make sure they are fresh and has no pesticides. However, if you have no time for growing roses and has no gardening space in your house, you can buy roses at your local flower shop. Just let the florist now that you need fresh roses so they can give you freshly delivered ones.
  2. When you already have the roses, make sure to wash the petals thoroughly to remove any pesticide or chemicals and dirt. You will not need the leaves and stem so you can discard them.
  3. You need 3-4 hips of roses, distilled water, a heat-resistant stainless steel or glass bowl, plate or glass cover, ice cubes, and a kitchen strainer.
  4. Pluck the rose petals and make sure to choose only the good ones. Put the rose petals in the bowl.
  5. Boil the distilled water and pour about 2-3 cups on the rose petals. Cover the bowl and let it sit for 20-30 minutes.
  6. Carefully strain the water using the kitchen strainer and let it cool. You then have the option of adding alcohol like vodka to preserve your rosewater or leave it as it is.
  7. You can then put it in a small bottle or a spray bottle to use it as a toner or a fresh mist on the go.
  8. The rosewater if added with alcohol can last up to 4 weeks and 1 week if it isn’t added with one.

The Use of Rose Water

You can put your rosewater in your bag and use it anytime you need it as a fresh mist or a toner for dry skin. Not only will your skin be hydrated on the go, you can also captivate people wherever you are with your sweet smell, the smell of roses.

How To Make Rose Water

Hub Comments

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    • Florida Guy profile imageAUTHOR

      Chen 

      5 years ago

      Hi Sun, depends on what you used. Roses come in different colors, if your roses were more yellow, peach or orange toned it would make rose water more that color. If that's what happened, that's fine. If your rose water got old and changed color later, then you should discard it.

    • profile image

      sun 

      6 years ago

      i made my rose water but it got orange coloured

      is it ok

    • Florida Guy profile imageAUTHOR

      Chen 

      7 years ago

      Enjoy your rose water Chat! :) Thanks for the like.

    • Chatkath profile image

      Kathy 

      7 years ago from California

      This is great FG, I love rose water but was never sure how to make. I would love to link this to one my natural beauty hubs if that's ok? Rated up and useful!

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