ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

I Miss Mayberry: A Moment With Bill Reflection

Updated on August 29, 2013

A Wistful Yearning

: a wistful or excessively sentimental yearning for return to or of some past period or irrecoverable condition; also :something that evokes nostalgia….Webster’s Dictionary

My wife and I had just returned from the supermarket where we had to pick up a few necessities, and my mind drifted as it has a tendency to do. I was trying to remember the first time I shopped in a supermarket, and the exact year was escaping me.

Yes, I am that old.

I was raised in Tacoma, Washington, a city of about 100,000 people in the 1950’s, and I am quite certain there were no supermarkets during that decade in Tacoma; at least there were none in the North End of that city where I was raised. When my folks needed groceries they went to the neighborhood market which was, in size, about the equivalent of a convenience store in today’s world.

Plunging through the depths of my memory, the first actual supermarket in our area was Piggly Wiggly and that appeared about 1963. I have clear memories of that store because my mom got a job as a cashier there shortly after it opened.

So that, of course, catapulted me into my nostalgia state, my “wistful yearning” for a simpler time, and that led me to wonder if those times of my childhood and teens really were worth being nostalgic over.

Sing along with me

My Mayberry during the 1950's and 1960's
My Mayberry during the 1950's and 1960's

Try to Remember

I’m not the only one who gazes back fondly on those days of yesteryear. I have written before about them and have received quite a few comments about how my readers wish for the simpler times.

Were they real or are they a figment of our imagination?

For me the simpler times included the following:

  • More time spent with family and friends
  • Friendly neighborhoods where everyone looked out for each other
  • More respect, more smiles on the street and more courtesy
  • Simple pleasures without the need of technology
  • More compromise over issues
  • Pride in one’s work and a decent wage that rewarded hard work
  • Less hectic lifestyles
  • Less debt
  • More of a do-it-yourself attitude

Of course there are more for that list but I think most of you would agree that those are some of the more important attributes of the Simple Life we all remember.

But it’s not all of us now is it? I mean, there are those reading this right now who were born during the 90’s, so thoughts back to the 50’s and 60’s are really ancient history that you cannot relate to. Still I suspect that even you young whippersnappers look back on simpler times, which leads to my question and the purpose of this article: when did the simple times end for you?

Can you think of the day, or week, or month or year when life ceased to be relaxing, when the pressures began to mount and the fun decreased?

We currently have six chickens in our backyard coop, and they invariably remind me of my grandparent’s farm. My grandma must have had twenty chickens at any given time, and for Sunday dinner she would go outside and cut off the head of the chosen chicken, and it would flop around for awhile while the nerves sputtered and finally stopped sending messages to the brain.

There are times when today’s society reminds me of those chickens with their heads cut off. Life is so hectic and so traumatic and so laden with worries that people appear to be receiving disconnected messages that leave them in a permanent flopping around stage.

Is that you? Do you miss the “simple times”….do you remember when they ended?

The father of Mayberry thinking

If You Can Remember

Well, if you can remember when they ended, and you know why they ended, then it seems to me….follow with me for a second….it seems to me that you can return to them and reverse the trend if you want to.

I have and you can too!

I remember when Mayberry ended for me. The exact date….January 9, 1969, the day my dad died. From that point on I had to be the man of the house at the tender age of twenty. From that day on I had a bundle of new responsibilities, and eventually those responsibilities became habit and the habit became a lifestyle and decades passed for me wondering why there was a hole in my heart and a yearning I could not define.

I played the “modern” game with gusto. I worked hard, earned more, spent more, owed more, worked harder. I bought the house and then a bigger house and then a bigger house, and I lined up my expensive toys and worshiped them but still….the longing….the emptiness….and the confusion.

Fast forward to the year 2013 and I’m living in Mayberry again.

How did it happen?

I quit playing the game. I had found a game I could not possibly win so I picked up my proverbial marbles and went home. I quit working a traditional job, sold everything I did not need, found a woman who wanted the same things I wanted, got rid of most of our debt and only purchased according to need rather than want.

That, in a nutshell and a seven-year synopsis, is how it happened!

My Mayberry today
My Mayberry today

But We Can’t Possible Do It

I’ve heard that so many times I want to projectile vomit like Linda Blair in The Exorcist.

Maybe not tomorrow, and maybe not even in seven years, but yes, you can do it if you want to do it.

What I have found the past few years is that some people are so heavily invested in this capitalism game that they cannot conceive of living a simpler life. They are bought and paid for by and with the Keynesian Economic Philosophy and they know of no other way. You reach adulthood and become a productive member of society, and productive, of course, means working forty or fifty hours per week, buying beyond your limit, piling up mountains of debt and then finding yourself trapped in a ride that has no terminus.

Well, my friends, it can end, but it requires some serious de-programming in your mind.

After a slight digression, let us return to the question asked earlier: when did the Simple Life end for you? Can you think of a particular day, as I can, or has it happened, as I suspect, slowly, gradually, like the advancement of a glacier, a seemingly unstoppable force in your life that threatens to crush the figurative life out of you?

Overly dramatic? I don’t think so. As I continue to travel through my life I see more and more people whose eyes no longer sparkle. I see more and more people who not only have lost the simple life but no longer even remember that it was once an option.

And that is terribly sad because life should be lived to the fullest. Life should be the pursuit of enjoyment and not a perpetual game of “Chase Your Own Tail” with the tail looking very much like a dollar sign.

Are you living in Mayberry?

See results

One Good Thing About Our Current Economy

Is there good in today’s economy? Well, if you listen to the political hacks then yes, there are signs of improvement. Tell that to the working mother of two pre-school children who works part-time at McDonalds.

No, the good thing I refer to is that the economy, that nebulous bastion for the fat cats, is so bad that it is forcing people to make wise changes in their spending habits and their thoughts about life. More and more people are taking a look at the present, foreseeing the inevitable future, and realizing that the madness must end, and the ending begins with them.

Spending must be reined in. Moving towards self-sustainability must happen. Rejecting the wants and embracing the needs must happen.

It turns out Mayberry really was a pretty good place to live, and an increasing number of people are trying to find their way back to that simple country road where pressures are less and pleasures are more.

Just follow the path that is inside of you and you can find Mayberry once again
Just follow the path that is inside of you and you can find Mayberry once again

How Do You Find Mayberry

It just so happens that I have some very simple driving instructions for you. Are you ready?

Take a left onto Carefree Lane and continue on it until you come to Whimsy Place. Turn right and drive until you see an unusual amount of people sitting on their porches drinking ice-cold Cherry Cokes…..you will see men and their sons walking to the fishing hole carrying their bamboo poles….you’ll see moms and daughters having tea parties in the backyard, and children playing in the park, and neighbors talking about life over the picket fences.

And everywhere you look you will see smiles and hear words of welcome.

Yes, Mayberry still exists and it is waiting for you.

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 3 years ago from New York, New York

      I do remember my own childhood fondly now and like you I am so glad I am trying to hold onto a piece of simpler times by how we are living right now. And seriously am so happy that I can say I am in your Mayberry often enough now. Thanks Bill and hope you are enjoying your morning.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, it's a nice place to live for sure....I hope you have many more years living at Whimsy Place. :) Thank you!

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      The simple life begins in your mind and works its way into every aspect of your life. Go with the flow or drive yourself crazy.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Wonderful story. Even though I am next to a big city our little street is pretty cozy. Perhaps some of this is found in how we view it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, is that an automatic transmission or manual when driving oneself crazy????

      Thanks lil'one....love you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Eric, I think that has much to do with living in Mayberry. :) Thanks buddy and have a great Thursday!

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      I am actually, believe it or not, living in a Mayberry in the small town in which we now live, well, it is pretty close, and we even have a Piggly Wiggly in the next town over. LOL I do remember growing up and going to the Piggly Wiggly back then, and I was a cashier for a brief moment at the A & P grocery store, where we had to take a math test and score 100, as we had to figure tax and change in our heads ---oh, my, who would have thought : ) for there were no beep, beeps then and a machine to figure the change and tax for one back then. In other words, we had to use our own brain and think... what a concept! hehe

      I am so glad we moved from the city in which I still work, and to come home to such peace and serenity and small town life is so lovely and the key word here is "peace" for we had no peace in city life.

      Thanks for the memories.

      Blessings, Faith Reaper

    • marcoujor profile image

      Maria Jordan 3 years ago from Jeffersonville PA

      I have had Mom in my heart and writing hand for a few days and this piece resounds so heavily and beautifully with me today, Bill. Thank you.

      OMG, Faith, I LOVE me some Piggly Wiggly, you rascal...!!

      Have a simply beautiful day...Love, Maria

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Well, Gaw-awlay Mr. Bill! (That's Gomer talking in case I misspelled his accent!) Ha ha. I love the hammock in your backyard. I can just imagine relaxing just as dusk sets in and the stars begin to come out to play. Lordy Goshen (that's Sha talking) I haven't done that in so long!

      I keep telling my son we need to go thru the house and gather up stuff for a yard sale. We have so much crap crammed into closets that we don't use or have outgrown. Whatever we don't sell will be donated so someone else can use what we've collected over the years.

      I'll come sit on your porch with you and Bev any day. But I'll bring my own Dr. Pepper.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, that must indeed be like heaven on earth. I love where we live but I'd love even more a little piece of country....maybe some day. :)

      Thanks for sharing your memories and oh yes I remember the cash register and having to use our brains. :)

      blessings always

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Maria, you are very welcome. You can come sit on our porch any old day...we'd love to have you.

      love,

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, there is always a chair waiting for you. Unfortunately Bev's daughter and her friend broke the hammock, but we'll make you comfortable my friend.

      love,

      bill

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      this rings a very loud and clear bell. I also remember a happy childhood and playing outdoors until dark. I also learned the words "we can't afford" and I never resented that. wanted more clothes bought a sewing machine. I think we learned to take responsibility during our youth in an easy way. I see my grand kids today with everything and getting to do everything they want. There is no WANT because it becomes a GET. Sometimes I just cringe and wonder what is growing up today and what is going to happen to these kids...Our life is changing around us no matter how much we insulate ourselves. Mayberry is my favorite city...people seemed to have fun, care about each other ...and there was NO fear about the bad people..Of course no fancy technology during those years. Possessions can own you, and the more stuff you have the more things will go wrong...taking care of possessions is a 24/7 job. Ranting today am I not??? Great write here Bill and it will hit the hearts of those who lived in that golden time.

    • Lastheart profile image

      Maria Magdalena Ruiz O'Farrill 3 years ago from Borikén the great land of the valiant and noble Lord

      Bill I think you are the brother I thought I did not have.

      Your deep words brought the smell of the grocery store in Manhattan, NY, where we used to buy when I was a child.

      I hope I can sleep after reminding me about that movie "The Exorcist".

      I am happy I am doing my best to walk the path of my Mayberry, once you find it, you just need to share it!

      Hugs and more blessings to you and to all who reads.

    • profile image

      dreamseeker2 3 years ago

      I loved that show...Mayberry RFD! : ) Feel good memories to boot! I use to watch it on my grandparents tv when we were young, because my folks didn't have a television yet. Go figure, eh? I think I was fourteen before one came into the house. (dad was against the 'sin box') lol! Yes, I do long for the simpler times. Before all the gadgets that consume our kids now. When board games sufficed to be played, not hand-held magic boxes that are now in 3D. Don't get me wrong, I play them too. But, I miss what it use to be like. Growing up in those times seems so surreal now, you know? Great hub! Had to be voted up and awesome!

    • W1totalk profile image

      W1totalk 3 years ago

      These are the words I had been searching for these past few days. Thank you for setting my mood right billybuc. Great writing.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, great recollections and I thank you for them and echo everything you said. I have serious concerns about the way kids are raised today...priorities like family time seem to be falling by the wayside and I think that is sad. Oh well, you and I will still be enjoying Mayberry and we will always have our memories.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Another great read Billy and like you I have also found my Mayberry right here in Cilgerran.

      Great song choice too and have a great day.

      Eddy.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Maria, I would be proud to be your brother. :)

      Once you walk the path of Mayberry it is always with you...true words my friend.

      blessings always

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      dreamseeker, it does seem surreal. All of the things we didn't have and we still managed to have fun as children. How did we ever do it? LOL Thank you so much for your recollections.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, W1totalk; have a great day my friend and thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eddy, without a doubt you are living in Mayberry...it resides in each of us who understand priorities in life. :) Thank you dear lady and blessings and love to you always.

      billy

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Aw, my lovely friend, Maria, I have had my sweet momma in my thoughts these past days too. Hugs to you this day, and thank you for the smiles LOL at the Piggly Wiggly hehehe

      Bill, sorry for the intrusion of your hub space here.

      Love you Maria,

      Faith Reaper

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, you can intrude any old time. :) Love to you both.

    • lambservant profile image

      Lori Colbo 3 years ago from Pacific Northwest

      My mom shopped at the Piggly wiggly on Pearl in the early 60's.

    • profile image

      Old Poolman 3 years ago

      Bill, I started out life in a little bitty town in Iowa, population around 400 not counting all the farmers who live outside the town boundaries. I actually believe that Mayberry used this little town as a model for their lifestyle.

      I left this little town and went off to see the world. Some 50 years later, I went back to visit this little town and guess what, it wasn't there anymore. Yes the houses and buildings were still there and were occupied, but the Mayberry attitude of the people living these had faded away. It had turned into a bedroom community where people lived but commute to work in the nearby cities. I learned that the past is from another time, and it doesn't wait for a visit by someone who had left and expected it to be the same when he came back.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      lambservant, I love it....she would have known my mother then, and seen me boxing groceries for the customers. :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Poolman, my family is all from Iowa. Great points made my friend. I saw their hometown, a town I had visited when I was five and ten, and I didn't recognize it at all....but it is still inside of me, and the lessons I learned there will always be with me. :)

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      I loved this hub and nodded as I read your checklist of simper times. I did have a fantastic childhood and it didn't consist of joining every club known to child or fancy vacations. Ours consisted of friends and cousins swimming in our pool all day and having meals of cold cuts and Entenmanns cakes. It was the few times I was allowed to have soda! Till this day, all of us recall those days with a smile and talk about them often. Our vacations were drives to Pennsylvania or Florida and staying at a no-name hotel (motel) for which I couldn't remember what it looked like, but I see the smiles on all of our faces in the photographs. We weren't spoiled by any means, but from the memories we were creating, we had everything in the world and wanted for nothing.

      I'd do anything to go back in time! Or at least bring that time into the present day! Beautiful hub, Bill!

    • Sparklea profile image

      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      billybuc: voted up, useful and awesome! I never missed The Andy Griffith show and how I loved Mayberry!

      I love your pictures of the previous and current Mayberry plus the path that I would love to be walking on...now. Thank you for your encouraging words that Mayberry still exists. Yes, it does!

      I also LOVED the Mayberry song by Rascal Flatts.

      Growing up, life WAS so much simpler...my sis and I lived with our grandparents on West Main Street. Bob's corner market was kiddie corner from our house, and we used to buy ice cream and popsicles all the time.

      Riding my bike, spending our summers at DeRuyter Lake...all these are my fondest memories.

      When did it end? I think it ended when technology started taking over the world.

      My first husband and I lived in a town, Margaretville, NY for the first two years we were married...located in the heart of the Catskill Mountains. My son was born there. IF you have a minute, please google it for some pictures. I would wheel my baby boy up and down the street. It was a simple town where everyone knew everybody. Oh, how I miss those days. We lived only about a half hour away from Delhi, NY, where my husband and I graduated from college. We were dating then, and we would go to the soda shop for hot chocolate or a sundae. I often visit Delhi and the Delhi Diner is still there!

      My teenage son and daughter were trained to use "While You Were Out" pads at home to take simple telephone messages. We did not have cell phones back then. We had a long cord on our wall phone, which my daughter stretched into her room to talk to her friends when she made a phone call.

      In 1985 the office where I worked as a secretary got a computer. You would have thought the golden calf dropped from the sky! I hated the thing as my boss put enormous pressure on me to "LEARN" it. He taught me to hate it. It wasted so much time for me because EVERYTHING (stuff I always turned in handwritten) now had to be typed on the golden calf. I was LIVID. It took me hours to do a previous fifteen minute job.

      I think that is my pinpoint of the loss of simpler times...along with the addiction of cell phones, x box games, and all sorts of technology.

      That being said I now LOVE the freedom of having a home computer to work on my writing dreams...stuff I want to put on it, not work stuff. Also I now have an i phone which I love, but it is not my "God"...I use it sparingly, and it is wonderful for many things.

      However, I DO miss the Mayberry years...and I always will.

      In conclusion, I now live the "Mayberry" life to an extent. It is called 'doing what I love to do'...reading, writing, Barnes & Noble and being my own boss...especially saying no to things I don't want to waste time doing.

      Sorry for the on and on...didn't mean for such a long answer to your profound, thought provoking question. Your hubs continue to be phenomenal, and you have no idea how much you have touched my life and my heart with all your encouraging writes. blessings, Sparklea :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Liz! City Center Motel in Seaside, Oregon..that's where we went every summer for our vacation. I can still see it today and I love those memories.....and no, we did not belong to silly clubs or go to camp or any other manufactured activity...we were just kids doing what kids used to do....have fun! :)

    • Man of Strength profile image

      Man of Strength 3 years ago from Orlando, Fl

      Great work, Bill. I'm an 80's child and I miss the simpleness of those days. We all can have Mayberry, it never went away. At times we let technology and social media dictate our lives for us. Thanks sir, for another masterpiece. Voted up.

    • dahoglund profile image

      Don A. Hoglund 3 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      I also grew up in the 1950's. A little earlier I recall, probably during the second word war, my uncle raised chichens in his back yard. This was in the city of Minneapolis. The big move to the suburbs came with the GI's coming homing and buyin with the GI Bill. The new housing was needed. I remember row and rows of Quanset huts that served as veterans housing back then. With the new suburbs came the big supermarkets. Then teh baby boom caused things to expand even more.

      But Mayberry is a state of mind. I currently live in a mid-Wisconsin City of about twenty thousand. Miles from the nearest interstate. Close to forest lakes and rivers.

    • Thelma Alberts profile image

      Thelma Alberts 3 years ago from Germany

      I remember my childhood time in the 60´s when I was playing with the other children in the streets. We were always creative in playing. I went with my mother washing the clothes in the river together with the other children and their mothers. We swam, played and catched fishes in the river, too. At night time, my grandfather was telling me how it was when he was my age while my granny was busy with my mother talking about our lives. Life was so simple then, but we had a wonderful time with our elder family member. Nowadays I could see how my nephews and nieces spend their lives with cellphones and computer games that they don´t even know what´s happening before their eyes.

      Thank you Bill for bringing me back to my beautiful memory lane. I always try to have a simple life. I don´t buy what I don´t need and always keep in mind not to have credit in the bank or other person.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Man of Strength, you are very welcome, and thanks for sharing your thoughts.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      dahoglund, without a doubt Mayberry is a state of mind, one I am quite comfortable living in. :) Thanks for sharing your memories of the midwest with us.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thelma, one of the things I have really noticed is that there aren't that many kids out playing. My God, we were out all the time. Our parents had to almost threaten us to get us inside to go to bed, and the weather made no difference. Rain, shine, snow...we were outside playing and having a ball. :)

      Anyway, thank you for sharing your memories with us.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lea my dear, what a great comment. I waited an hour until I had the time it deserved.

      It's interesting about technology, isn't it? That which was supposed to save us so much time and labor has, in many ways, made us busier and in turn we have become slaves of it. I met someone the other day who did not know how to change a tire. I was flabbergasted. Now true, technology does not directly relate to that situation, but I suspect that technology has made that young man's life to simple that he never had any reason to learn things that we were forced to learn.

      I was just like you when computers were introduced....pissed! LOL Now I can't imagine not having one, but if the systems all fried I'll bet I could remember how to type on a typewriter and write a message longhand.

      Ahhh, Lea, thank you for a great comment.

      blessings always

      bill

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      Never had much TV, but am familiar with the concept of the Mayberry simple lifestyle. Anyway, what I love about articles like these, is the way you pull your reader in when you share your own thoughts and feelings. You're good!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 3 years ago from Deep South, USA

      I think you struck a nerve here, Bill. Almost everyone I know over the age of 50 thinks of their youth with wistfulness...not because they want to be young again, but with a wish to leave the rat race behind and return to a simpler way of life...a less stressful manner of living.

      I was caught up in a career that forced me to work too many hours. I never dared go anywhere--including vacation or to the hospital-- without my Blackberry "just in case" top management had a question for me (which was all too often). In lieu of "me" time in which I could relax and enjoy my life, I spent money in a foolish attempt to fill the void. Anyone who has ever tried that knows it doesn't work!

      Retirement came as a shock to my system, and it took me a year to recover from the depression that hit me. But, recover I did, and learned to love not being a slave to the clock or the calendar. I don't have to make an appointment to read a book. Life's good.

      Since then, I haven't looked back. I traded in my business wear for jeans and tee shirts, stopped wearing jewelry (gave the good stuff to my granddaughters) and began cutting my own hair at the bathroom mirror. I do without many things I once thought I had to have, but find I don't miss them at all. My priorities are so different now, and I'm immensely grateful for the change. Life is much sweeter traveling the road to Mayberry...and I'm on my way.

      Voted Up and Awesome,

      Jaye

    • Curiad profile image

      Mark G Weller 3 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      Bill, I remember those days, I live with them in my heart and mind every day. Yes I live in this mess of a world, but my spirit lives in 1960.

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 3 years ago from New York

      We can all live in Mayberry...its in our hearts and our families. Fortunately for us we live in a little town called Tillson that isn't unlike Mayberry. We know all our neighbors and they know us. We help each other when its needed and there's no keeping up with the Joneses.

      Its all about living and loving Bill, whether its in Mayberry or NYC.

      As always, loved your thoughts and directions my friend, living on Whimsy Place is the only way to go!!

      Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 3 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I can remember living in a small town when i was growing up. Everyone knew each other. The school was the most important place in town, PTA was never missed, sitting on the porch in the evening, danger never entered our mind. Neighbors coming to borrow a cup of sugar. A small grocery store on the corner where you purchased what you needed and it was paid for at the first of the month. We have one place here where i live now that still sells ' on time ' I still watch Mayberry reruns. I loved that show. Aha, the good ole days. It is good to look back. Thank you. I live in the now, but i still remember..

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, I appreciate it very much. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jaye, what a great comment. Thank you for sharing your experience. I traveled a similar road and almost killed myself doing it. Now life is better than I could ever imagine. Turns out the answer was in my heart and mind all along. :)

      Thank you Jaye!

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mark, I love the way you put it....so very true. There my spirit will always be, and I'm trying my damndest to recreate it in 2013.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I want to be mayor of Whimsy Place! I think it would be a cool job, don't you? :) Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Nicely stated, Ruby....live in the now, but still remember. I like that and I hope I always remember those days fondly.

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      Excellent! This is so true! There was a time I could walk through my neighborhood and know everyone I saw. We'd wave. Share a cup of sugar. Pick up a loaf of bread at the market for the family down the street with the daughter with chicken pox. Now if I say hello to someone, they think I'm weird and avoid me! I haven't lost that smile on my face though. Because I remember Mayberry too.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Crafty! Hey, I'm featuring you in my hub tomorrow....a perfect example of what I am talking about tomorrow, so thank you in advance. :)

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 3 years ago from south Florida

      I grew up in a Mayberry type of town, Bill, so this sweet hub brought back many pleasant memories of living in a simpler, kinder world. Thank you.

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 3 years ago

      I loved the show Mayberry, RFD. Every problem was solved in its 30 minute slot.

      And, only recently have I begun to enjoy SOME country music. Rascal Flatts, being one of the best; along with Antebellum.

      I am struck with awe at the number of comments speaking of a happy

      childhood. Interesting, but nothing I can relate to.

      Great TV show that will live on in re-runs.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      My pleasure, drbj, and thank you! Have a great Friday my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, I love Lady Antebellum...such great chemistry between the two lead singers.....as for Mayberry....this was my childhood for sure. :)

      Thanks my friend. Sleep well and knock them dead tomorrow.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 3 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      You've started me thinking about when the simple life ended for me, Bill, which is a sign of a great post. Thanks for triggering my memories and thoughts.

    • profile image

      Ghost Hubber 3 years ago

      As humans we always want more. We just want everything advanced and easier, but we don't realize what we are losing. In the pursuit of "Happiness" we are getting more and more selfish. Everyone thinks-- Screw others, Screw the environment, why should I care. And still they expect everyone else to do the right thing.

      You must be the change you wish to see in the world.

      - Mahatma Gandhi

      Charity begins at home, and justice begins the next door.

      - Charles Dickens

      Great Hub, Billy! Looking forward to read more of your hubs.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      Absolutely. It is funny that I came across this today. I was thinking the other day that the little town (it's tiny) reminds me of Mayberry just the other day.

      It is different in one way and that is we have diversity of cultures and races which makes our lives more enlarged as we learn from and about each other.

      As far as our country at large I believe that we just need to open our eyes and hearts and minds to find that kind of carefree life once again. I do think it is here waiting of for us.

      Thank you for sharing this, Bill. I am aware that we have issues in our country, huge ones, but if we dwell dwell dwell on the negative we will never have time for finding the positive.

      Finding the goodness begins with us.

      Angels are on the way to you this morning ps

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 3 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi Bill,

      Absolutely loved this and what triggers it brought. In fact that's not strictly true as I find myself thinking more and more of times gone by, particularly times spent with both sets of grandparents. They were incredibly special and simpler times when I learned to appreciate so much of what I love today. Strangely we lost both grandmothers within a week of each other and 6 years later the same with my my grandfathers. The other big turning point for me that brought change was in 1997 when my mum died suddenly at home found by me and my youngest brother. She was the light of our family, the energy and my mentor, best friend and the most giving human being I have known. She was a Mayberry girl through and through and so much died with her that day in October. I have gone through many changes even this past year has been a rollercoaster but MJ and I have our Mayberry in southern Italy which is exactly as you depict in the final paragraph. Our Italian neighbor has had us to coffee, diner and lunch, left fresh produce she grows by our door, shouts across the olive trees " Suzanna, caffe, caffe" when coffee time is up! locals are friendly and welcoming, no airs graces, frills just honest good people living a simple but oh so rewarding life.

      Your hammock and patio have our names on them, oh how I adore hammocks and will have one in Italy. I can just see the 4 of us chatting away on your porch till way into the early hours over coffee with not one awkward silence, how could there be with us 4??LOL

      Cheers so much, sorry for the ramble, but it is the effect your writing has, thoughts just pour out! Have a gorgeous weekend! Say hi as always to the lovely Bev!!

    • Sparklea profile image

      Sparklea 3 years ago from Upstate New York

      billybuc: Thank you for your lovely note. I LOVE your hubs! Didn't mean to complain about technology...it is good, but, in my opinion, misused. Everywhere I go I see people...cell phone in hand, texting away. ALL ages, but especially teens. I saw a toddler in a carriage playing with one a couple weeks ago!

      Although I believe technology has interfered with simpler times, it cannot and will never eradicate it. The small towns in America are here to stay, and I love that! Here in New York State we have the finger lakes, Market Street in Corning, NY with an old fashion ice cream store...beautiful little towns...even over the border in Pennsylvania.

      We should all take time to go on day trips and escape to the Mayberry life. I take frequent ones with my friends...and usually end the day in an ice cream parlor. They are all over the place! THANK YOU again for this wonderful hub. Blessings, Sparklea :)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thanks Alicia. That's one of my goals always, to trigger some thought and reflection.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ghost Hubber, thanks for the follow and the nice words. It's an interesting time we live it....not necessarily better, but definitely interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You know me, PS....PIPO till I die. Negative people turn me off and they are not allowed in my own personal Mayberry. It's my little world and I get to choose who I play with. :)

      Have a great Friday my friend, and hugs and blessings coming your way

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzie, that Italy home sounds like my idea of Mayberry for sure. I love your depiction of it.

      I can see the four of us talking until the wee hours and no silence at all....how could there be silence with MJ and Bev around? LOL

      We'll leave the light on for you, Irish, and look forward to your visit.

      Say hi to the Mickster for me and have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Lea, I love ice cream parlors, and especially the ones with the old-fashioned milkshake mixers....then I am truly in heaven on Earth.

      Thank you again deal lady and have a great weekend.

      blessings always

      bill

    • old albion profile image

      Graham Lee 3 years ago from Lancashire. England.

      Hi Bill. You have taken me back 62 years to my old mayberry. What do I remember? In Lancashire in the UK, they brought out an Ice Cream on a stick. This in itself was unbelievable but the name has always been with me it was the first Ice Cream stick ever and it was called a 'New Yorker' It was 1952, the second world war not long over. Food was rationed then, we had to have coupons to get anything. Then to a 7 year boy came an Ice Cream on a stick it was great to be able to get a New Yorker. It was really something special.

      Voted up and all.

      Graham.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Graham, what a great memory....weird but I have never heard of the New Yorker. We had ice cream bars on sticks but not by that name.

      It must have really been something to live in England shortly after the end of the war...so much damage...so much rebuilding to do....so much pain to quiet.

      Anyway, thank you for your memory and have a great weekend.

    • livingsta profile image

      livingsta 3 years ago from United Kingdom

      Wow, this is beautiful Bill and it has brought back memories of my childhood days. I agree and so wish to have that peaceful life in a quiet village or countryside.

      Thank you for sharing this with us Bill.

      Have a lovely weekend!

      Sending you smiles and blessings :-)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dahlia, good to see you once again my lovely friend. Bev and I are three years from moving to the country and I can hardly wait. :)

      Thank you and have a wonderful weekend. Hugs are heading your way.

      bill

    • Vinaya Ghimire profile image

      Vinaya Ghimire 3 years ago from Nepal

      Billy

      I find myself on the same shoes while thinking about simple times.

      Once in a while, I take a break and travel to my farm to hand milk water buffaloes, feed chicken and cut trees.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Vinaya, that sounds like heaven to me. If I were there I would help you milk those water buffaloes. :)

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thank you for sharing this personal story to us all. I enjoyed reading it.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Everything that you say here is very conceivable. We start the game when we are on our own in adulthood, and we are trapped, until we realize that we can control our lives. Some can, some do, some will, and some won't. The magic key is within one's reach. The secret is to cut back, just like you said, and all that pleasure rolls back again. Believe me. I am living proof, for I didn't conform to society long.

    • hawaiianodysseus profile image

      Hawaiian Odysseus 3 years ago from Southeast Washington state

      Hey, Bill!

      Just wanted you to know that you captivated my attention the whole way through. The Andy Griffith Show whistling theme played in the background of my memory banks as I walked along the nostalgic lane with you. So your mom worked at PW? Awesome. We grew up dirt poor in a sugar cane plantation camp, and going to the small grocery store was like this huge deal to us little kids. I still remember when I found a penny and a Filipino peso under our house and thought I had reached pay dirt. I was four, and I took my two-year-old brother the half mile or so to the camp store. The cashier kindly gave me my peso back, but took the penny and gave me a package containing four chocolate malted balls. Got back home and, for my trouble, got spanked by my mom and then endured a second dose from Dad when he got home. Great Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer adventure, for sure! The lesson I learned? Keep digging in the sand for more treasure! And that's exactly where I'm at today! : ) Aloha, my good friend!

      ~Joe

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      vkwok, it was a wonderful childhood and I love to share it. Thanks for reading buddy.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Deb, it is a wonderful like, just like Jimmy Stewart said it was. :) All it takes is stepping off the treadmill of life and taking time to enjoy the real pleasure.

      Thank you and have a great weekend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Joe, as usual your comment is deep in lessons learned and life enjoyed. Those were the days my friend, and although we will never again see prices of that kind, we can experience once again the thrills of a life well lived.

      Thank you buddy! Malted balls for a penny....love it!

      Aloha

      bill

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 3 years ago from The Beautiful South

      I am sure I will never make it to Mayberry but I am pretty close to Mt. Pilot, seriously! lol

      Great read! ^ and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackie, I don't know how Mt. Pilot would work in that song. LOL I'm glad you are close; Mayberry is in each of us if we are willing to accept it.

      Thank you as always and have a wonderful Sunday.

      bill

    • Victoria Lynn profile image

      Victoria Lynn 3 years ago from Arkansas, USA

      A very nostalgic write-up, Bill! Nice. I would love to drink a nice cold lemonade on the front porch in Mayberry. Unfortunately, spending all the hours to make a living gets in the way, but maybe things will get easier some day. Thanks for a nice read. I listened to the song, too. I like it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hey Vicki, thanks for stopping by this holiday weekend. I hope you are resting up and ready for a new month and the challenges that come with it.

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 3 years ago from United Kingdom

      I didn't grow up in Mayberry. In fact, I was about as far away from it as one can imagine. But I always dreamed of moving there. With each passing day I get that little bit closer. I can't wait for the day I can finally settle there. :)

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      I grew up outside Washington DC so it wasn't Mayberry, but I knew everyone on our little block and loved growing up there. I live in a small town now, but wish I lived in a bigger city again. I miss it often. For a lot of people I think Mayberry is wherever one grows up, big or small. And on a light note, thanks for the title, now I am whistling the Andy Griffith show around the house.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Phoenix, I assume you came from the city life...as did I....but I had enough small glimpses of Mayberry to make me want it one day, every day...and I'll get there. :) Thanks my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LOL...sorry about that, Glimmer. That is one of those songs that will not go away once it is stuck in our brains. Good luck extricating it. :)

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 3 years ago from United Kingdom

      I did indeed, Bill. NYC to be precise. I'm getting closer to my little slice of Mayberry. I currently live in a village surrounded by farms near a small city. It took some getting used to but I'm adapting. I hope one day to move to Cornwall where I can stroll along the beach in the morning and go rambling in the woods in the afternoon. Here's wishing us both well in our search for Mayberry.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Phoenix, I figure we are three years away from our dream if all goes well....a big "if" for sure, but a dream is only a dream until we make it happen, so the rest is up to me. :) Best wishes to you and your dream.

    • carter06 profile image

      Mary 3 years ago from Cronulla NSW

      Great article Billy..I agree the simple life idea is appealing and I long sometimes for more family and friends time to sit and enjoy one anothers company; and dream for a more green, organic and self sustaining lifestyle.. but I don't necessarily want to go back to a time without technology as it is today..lovemyiphoneetc:) cheers

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carter, there is no doubt that we are all married to technology now, and that is not a bad thing. I can't imagine not having a computer.....still....I miss those times. :) Thank you!

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 3 years ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Oh bill, This one touched my very soul. How I adore walks down Memory Lane....and this one literally flooded my mind, putting a smile on my face. I'm often teased for being so sentimental and especially for my incessant chatter on the "best life," in the '50's & '60's......I am such a true blue Boomer, in so many ways.

      Needless to say, I echo your thoughts....it's all so true. It really WAS a sweeter, happier, more glorious time. It's no secret to me, why I live as peacefully and simplistically as I can create. Truth is, I just can't let go.....because I don't WANT to! Love this one, bill. Thank you! UP+++

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Awww, thanks Paula! I'm a sentimental fool as well and I refuse to give up on this lifestyle. I paid big time for my mistakes and I see no reason to repeat them. :) Color me simple from now on.

      Thanks for stopping by my friend. Welcome home!

    • moonlake profile image

      moonlake 3 years ago from America

      My brother just this month went back to our old hometown. He said it was sad and he was sorry he went back. He would have rather remembered it the way it was when we were kids, a happy Mayberry town. Enjoyed your hub voted up and shared.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Interestingly, moonlake, our old neighborhood looks exactly the same. It's like 50 years passed by but nobody told that area. At least visually it was the same. :)

      Thanks for stopping by and I hope your writing is going well.

    • Pamela Kinnaird W profile image

      Pamela Kinnaird W 3 years ago from Maui and Arizona

      I enjoyed your reflective thoughts, Bill.

      I was very surprised that your grandma would and could cut the head off a chicken. My grandma used to do that, too, but I didn't know that until I was older. And I sure never saw her do it. I'm practically a vegetarian now.

      Many happy years and decades ahead of you with your writing, I hope, Bill. This was very much enjoyed.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Pamela. My grandma made it through the Great Depression doing anything she had to do to eat....those lessons will definitely stick with you for a lifetime. I, however, could not do it; our chickens are pets. LOL

    Click to Rate This Article