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Low Sodium Food Shopping

Updated on January 17, 2019
liza ann profile image

Liza Ann acquired a BA in English in the 1900's. She now has a host of special diet requirements and wants to share workarounds with you.

The Lowdown on Sodium

"The average American consumes way too much salt." We hear it all the time, and we ignore it or assume it doesn't apply to us personally. We exercise, we're not overweight and we "eat right", so what's the problem?

The problem is that the American Heart Association estimates the average American consumes more than 3,400 mg of sodium daily. The AHA recommends that people reduce the sodium in their diets to 1,500 mg or less per day to reduce the risk of developing high blood pressure, meaning we need to cut our salt intake by more than half. Really? We're getting more than twice the salt we should? Not to mention there are other medical conditions that can be improved by lowering sodium intake. Heart disease, liver disease, and Meniere's disease are just a few. I am opening a Pandora's box here - stay tuned for related hubs - but for now I'm going to stay on topic and get my readers some information about shopping for lower sodium foods.

I sincerely hope this helps you jump-start your sodium reduction plan. No recipes (yet), just suggestions for grocery shopping and quick foods. Not all of us enjoy cooking, and fewer of us have time, so educate yourselves and you'll be more likely to stick with the plan.

Beware of Processed Foods!

Source

Processed Foods Are Everywhere

If you've never heard about processed foods being bad, you're living in a Hobbit-hole somewhere. So what exactly is a processed food? Basically it's any food that has been altered from its natural state, either for safety reasons or convenience. Canned and frozen foods, sandwich meats and cheeses, chips and crackers, dried fruit...and the list goes on. Most of these foods are packing ridiculous amounts of sodium.

Other processed foods that may high in sodium:
• Breads and pastas made with refined white flour instead of whole grains
• Packaged cakes and cookies
• Boxed meal mixes
• Some breakfast cereals

Yes, even sweet-tasting foods can be high in sodium!

Source

Read the Nutrition Labels

Seriously. Some breakfast cereals have 0mg sodium per serving (shredded wheat) and some have 350mg (raisin bran). Much of the information they provide can go against our assumptions, so read them. When you've found the products that work for you, write down the specific brand(s) so you don't have to read labels every time. I keep a Low Sodium shopping list - it takes time in the beginning but saves a huge amount of time over the long run. I've provided a chart to get you going:

Food Categories and Sodium Content

Category
LOWER Sodium
HIGHER Sodium
Beverages
Water, Tea, Soft Drinks
Tomato Juice (> 340mg)
Cereals
Shredded Wheat (<10mg)
Raisin Bran (>300mg)
Condiments
Jam or jelly, Fruit Butter (<10mg per tbsp)
Mayonnaise, Relish, Catsup (all >100mg Per tbsp)
Breads/Wraps
Oat Bran Bread (100mg per slice)
Egg bagel (530mg ea.)
Dairy/Cheese
Ricotta Cheese, 1/2 cup (104mg)
Cottage cheese, 4 oz (430mg)
Fruit
Most fruits have <10mg
Avocado, 1 medium (20mg)
Meats
Chicken, white meat, roasted, non-processed (43mg)
Canadian Bacon, 3 oz. (1,197mg)
Soup
---
ALL canned soups are high in sodium, even the "lower sodium" versions
 
 
 

Parting Words

"As adults, after years of eating overly salted foods, we have to make a committed effort to changing our palates. Experts say on average it takes 8 to 12 weeks." - WebMD

Now, hang in there and get started on that shopping list. You aren't going to get to that 1500 mg per day all at once, but you ARE going to consume less salt, starting today. I'll be back soon with cook-ahead snack recipes that keep in the fridge for up to a week.

Comments

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    • liza ann profile imageAUTHOR

      liza ann 

      9 years ago from Richmond, VA

      Absolutely, Organicpixie! And this means almost ALL fast foods are off limits. There are a few exceptions, though. Keep researching those other options and let us know what you find out.

    • Organicpixie profile image

      Organicpixie 

      9 years ago from London

      Healthy eating and choosing to make food at home is one way you can reduce your sodium intake. Processed foods is probably the main culprit in eating to much salt/sodium.

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