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Simple Effective Jock Itch Treatment (Tinea Cruris)

Updated on February 14, 2015
Jock Itch can be extremely aggravating... Image by Poldavo (Alex)
Jock Itch can be extremely aggravating... Image by Poldavo (Alex)

The Basics

Jock itch, or tinea cruris, is caused by a form of ringworm. This may sound confusing, but that does not mean you have worms living in your skin, ringworm is really a fungal infection. These fungi are present and common in the everyday world but can survive only underneath the skin in warm and moist areas of the body (feet and groin areas are the most common. Athelete's foot is the same as jock itch but on the foot.)

As most readers of this article probably already know, tinea cruris can be severely itchy and also painful. Besides the discomfort, jock itch sufferers have to deal with a large nasty looking rash in the pubic area that can be scaly, reddish-brown, and bumpy.

Tinea cruris is normally not serious, but it is far from desirable and because of this I will let you know how to get rid of jock itch quickly, effectively, and for cheap.


How to Cure With Vinegar

Vinegar is known to be very effective in combatting mold, mildew, and yeast. When it comes to jock itch or tinea cruris it is no different. While traditional over the counter tinea cruris treatment may be effective at treating jock itch, many cases are too stubborn and require something more powerful. Here's the quick rundown of vinegar: its cheap, effective at treating tinea cruris, and there are few or no side effects.

Apply vinegar (either apple cider or white vinegar) to the affected area, and let it dry completely. Use full strength vinegar (do not dilute with water). You may find it easier to apply if you add the vinegar to a paper towel or washcloth first. A good time to do this would be a few minutes before taking a shower, allowing enough time for the vinegar to dry first. Another way to apply the vinegar would be to put some in a water squirt bottle.


Common Treatments

If your condition is not responding well to the vinegar solution, there are other things you can try. There are antifungal powders and creams available at many drug stores you can purchase which do not require a prescription. You should look for an antifungal solution that has terbinafine, clotrimazole, or miconazole in it. There are many different brands but some of the most well known include Lotrimin, Lamisil, and Micatin. If you decide to attempt to treat your jock itch with an antifungal product, read the label and follow the directions. If you stop applying the product right when the jock itch disappears, it may come right back. Make sure your whole body is free of all fungus first because if you have fungus on your feet (athlete's foot) it could spread right back to your groin area if it gets on your hand and you touch around there.

Image by f_mafra
Image by f_mafra

Future Prevention

Once you have successfully gotten rid of your jock itch (thank god!) go by a few simple measures to make sure you don't have to go through that whole experience again.

- Keep groin, butt, and inner thighs dry and clean (moisture is probably the reason you got it in the first place)

- Dry off completely after shower and intensive exercise.

- Wash underwear, socks, and towels after each use.

- Wear something on your feet like shower shoes whenever using public showers.

- If you have athlete's foot, take every measure you can to make sure you don't touch your groin area after touching your feet.


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    • profile image

      savannahms 

      6 years ago

      Here are some tips to prevent you from getting, or to help you get rid of, jock itch.

      Since the athletes foot fungus is very closely related to the ones that cause ringworm and jock itch, put on your socks BEFORE you put on your clean underwear. This prevents any fungus on your feet from coming into contact with your groin area.

      Talcum or silica powder can help dry the skin, however mineral-based talcum powder is dangerous if inhaled in quantity. Silica powder, an environmentally inert material, is a safer choice.

      There are many anti-fungals besides "store-bought" creams that work well and are easily available, some of them common kitchen products. Here's a link to a page that tells you what they are and how to use them: http://www.best-mens-skin-care.com/jock-itch-home-...

      Last but not least, stop scratching!

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