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Can you explain what a treatment and management plan for Rhabdomyolysis would in

  1. connorj profile image77
    connorjposted 5 years ago

    Can you explain what a treatment and management plan for Rhabdomyolysis would include?

    Do you happen to know anyone who has sufffered from Rhabdomyolysis? If you did what was  it like for them? What was the treatment plan like?

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/7407737_f260.jpg

  2. eHealer profile image88
    eHealerposted 5 years ago

    Hi Connorj, Rhabs, as it's called in the medical community, is when skeletal muscle breaks down, enters the bloodstream, and "gets stuck in the kidneys" when they try to filter the blood. The breakdown of the muscle turns into a harmful substance, myogloblin, and becomes toxic to the body and can cause damage to the organs. Most causes seen in the US are alcoholism and drugs (cocaine and heroin), crushing injuries or trauma to the muscles, heatstroke, certain types of seizures and blood clots.

    Treatment is generally trying to balance the ph (acid and base), IV bicarbonate to flush the kidneys, and frequent blood tests that tell us when to administer electrolyes and metabolites (potassium and magnesium) via IV. It is a balancing act in ICU that takes complete and total attention by the RN to keep the patient from going into shock. Hemodialysis might be needed as well. Hope this helps answer your question. Deb

    1. connorj profile image77
      connorjposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you eHealer, my daughter was cross fit training and has been diagnosed with this...

    2. eHealer profile image88
      eHealerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I'm so sorry Connorj, I will keep you in my prayers, was she over-exercising? What happened?

    3. connorj profile image77
      connorjposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Kelsey is on the road to becoming a Physical Therapist.  She has participated in irish step Dance since she was 5 so she is used to aerobic activity; however, she had just started cross-fit training when it happened...

  3. RNMSN profile image91
    RNMSNposted 5 years ago

    Although not a common occurrence, this disease often comes from trauma of some kind,although as ehealer already pointed out,people who lead  a reckless lefestyle, are at greater risk.
    As for treatment,after diagnosis, it is done symptom based. So, if the ph is off, and the person has either too much or not enough potassium,then potassium is either given or the blood potassiumm is diluted
    At all events IV fluids are given and if there is enough urine production,diuretics (like lasix) can be taken to stimulate the flushing out of toxins from the kidneys.
    It is the kidneys that suffer the most,because as the muscles break down, the contents of the muscles themselves go into the blood (thats the myoglobin) and when all of that is filtered through the kidneys,the kidneys will fail
    Most of the time, dialysis,especially if kidney failure is in the acute stage,is needed.
    The one thing I took away from researching this is the warning to always always drink plenty of water after strenuous exercise...and thats important advice for everyone;from daily work outs to weekend warriors. So many people trying to burn excess calories these days...how many really drink enough water after all of their exercise?
    Thank you for this question,  needed this advice!
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001505/

    1. connorj profile image77
      connorjposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you RNMSN! This information is significantly helpful. Our daughter (20 years) was cross-fit-training and has been diagnosed with this...

 
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