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How To Exercise Back Pain Away

  1. profile image46
    tomsee59posted 10 years ago

    According to past research and studies, nearly 80%
    of all Americans will experience some type of back
    pain in their lives.  The American Academy of
    Orthopedic Surgeons believes this as well, as they
    say 80% of us out there will encounter some type of
    problem with our back before we die.

    Traditionally, the treatment for lower back pain is
    increasing core strength to increase flexibility on
    muscles that are tight, which will provide better
    stabilization of the spine and exercises to correct
    the imbalances of the muscles.  The muscles that
    surround the spine will provide stability and support
    of the spinal column.

    Every muscle between the hips and shoulders are
    included as well, as these muscles are referred to
    as the core muscles.  Back pain can be a result of
    muscle imbalances caused by any of these core
    muscles.  If the back of your thighs are weaker than
    the front of your thighs, there will be an uneven
    pull on the front of your spinal column. 

    There are some effective ways that you can integrate
    core strength training exercises into all of the
    exercises you perform, rather than doing just the
    traditional crunches and sit-ups.  One such way
    is by breathing effectively.  Deep breathing will
    utilize your diaphragm muscles which will help
    support the spinal column and lengthen the spine,
    which is great for your lower back and supporting
    you when you walk or run.

    The tummy tuck and bridge lift can also help you
    to reduce back pain and strengthen the core
    muscles as well.  The tummy tuck exercise is a
    simple pelvic tilt that draws the abdominal muscles
    away from the floor.  Do perform a tummy tuck,
    simply lie face down on the floor and squeeze
    your glutes to strengthen your spine.

    Instead of pressing into your thighs, you should
    instead reach your tailbone down towards your
    heels.  Perform 15 reps of each exercise and
    alternate them until you have completed a couple
    of sets. 

    For the bridge, place your feet on a bench or
    on the floor and scoop your pelvis upward, as your
    rib cage should stay low to reduce any irritation
    to your spinal muscles.  The bridge will help to
    relieve stress on your back and focus the muscle
    contractions into the glutes and the hamstrings.

    Other exercises for lower back pain are the lumbar
    side stretch, hip flexor stretch, and calf
    stretches, as all three can help to alleviate
    pull on your spinal column.

    Hip flexor stretch
    When doing a hip flexor stretch, bring one foot
    forward in a bent knee, 90 degree angle, while your
    other leg is on the floor behind you with your
    foot pointed upwards toward the ceiling.  The
    hip flexor stretch will help to open up the
    muscles of your back on the side of the spine near
    your hips.  You can also squeeze your glutes as
    well to deepen the stretch with each breath you
    exhale.  You should begin to feel a stretch in your
    back leg, in the thigh front and the hamstrings
    on your front leg.

    Lumbar side stretch
    This stretch will bring your legs wide with your
    knees bent while you sit or stand.  Simply bring
    one hand down towards your foot on the inside of
    the thighs and your other hand behind your head.

    The last stretch will open up your Achilles tendon,
    which is the most distant pull on the spine.  For
    this, place an object under your foot and lean the
    weight of your body forwards.  Maintain a fluid
    breath while you hold stretches for 30 seconds or
    so.  After a while, you should begin to feel a
    stretch behind your knee and shin.

 
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