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How To Make A Flag Magnet For The Fourth of July

Updated on September 24, 2016

The Fourth of July is a patriotic holiday for making red, white, and blue themed arts and crafts to express our national spirit. One of my hobbies is making my own magnets, so I decided to make a cross stitch American flag, which has thirteen red and white stripes, and a blue canton with fifty white stars. The stripes stand for the original thirteen colonies, and the fifty stars stand for the current fifty states. Each time a new state was admitted to the union a new star was added to the flag, which means the last time two stars were added was back in 1959 for Alaska and Hawaii. My cross stitch magnet only has forty-eight stars, but I ran out of room and was not able to add all fifty. If you want to be very precise you can measure out the stitches on the plastic mesh in advance, but I decided to just work with a rectangular scrap that I had left over from another project, which means I was not able to add all fifty stars. To me it is fun to simply capture the essence of the flag, and a few times I have even drawn fun pictures of Old Glory with just a few stars in the canton. Cross stitching is a project you can work on while visiting with friends, or just watching TV, which makes it perfect because it does not require too much attention. The supplies that I used for this project consist of:

  • plastic canvas mesh
  • a large eyed needle for cross stitching with yarn
  • red yarn
  • blue yarn
  • white yarn
  • a black marker
  • scissors
  • a ruler


I decided to make this cute American flag magnet for my fridge.
I decided to make this cute American flag magnet for my fridge.

Step One: Cut Out The Flag Shape

Use black marker to draw out the shape of Old Glory.
Use black marker to draw out the shape of Old Glory.

Use a black marker to draw out the shape of Old Glory. For this project I used a ruler to draw precise lines for cutting. Next, take the scissors and make sure to cut carefully alone the lines. Use a rule to draw the stripes, canton, and stars. Once you have drawn out the flag it is time to start cross stitching.

Step Two: Begin Cross Stitching The Canton

Begin cross stitching on the blue of the canton.
Begin cross stitching on the blue of the canton.

Start by cross stiching the blue yarn on to the canton of the flag. First take the scissor and cut off enough yarn to cross stich a few rows. Secure the yarn to the plastic mesh by sewing over a small portion of the thread at the bottom.

Step Three: Continue Cross Stiching The Canton

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Keep cross stitching the blue of the canton.Here I am over halfway finished adding the blue.Here the blue canton is completed.
Keep cross stitching the blue of the canton.
Keep cross stitching the blue of the canton.
Here I am over halfway finished adding the blue.
Here I am over halfway finished adding the blue.
Here the blue canton is completed.
Here the blue canton is completed.

Keep cross stitching the blue yarn on to the canton portion of the flag. One of my favorite things to do is watch my own cross stitch work take shape, so take a gander at the slide show above to see the progress.

Step Four: Begin Adding The Stars

Start adding the stars to the flag.
Start adding the stars to the flag.

I made small cross shaped stitches to create the stars on the canton of my flag. What I did was make a right half stitch and then come back around to make a left half stitch.

Step Five: Keep Adding The Stars

Click thumbnail to view full-size
The stars alternate on each row.Here all of the stars have been added.
The stars alternate on each row.
The stars alternate on each row.
Here all of the stars have been added.
Here all of the stars have been added.

Keep adding the cross shaped stitches that will stand in for the stars on Old Glory. From a distance these actually look like real stars, but my canton only could fit forty-eight. Count out the stars precisely if you want to fit in all fifty on your flag. My flag is going to be a World War II themed Fourth of July magnet since I could only fit in forty-eight stars, which will remind me of how both my grandpas were stationed in Hawaii and the Pacific during the conflict. 

Step Six: Start Adding The White Stripes

Start cross stitch the white rows on the flag.
Start cross stitch the white rows on the flag.

Start adding the white stripes to the flag following the outlines of the permanent marker drawing. For this project I cross stitched two rows of white yarn for each stripe, which add up to a total of six.

Step Seven: Keep Adding The White Stripes

Click thumbnail to view full-size
I have added over half of the white stripes here.Now all the stars have been added.
I have added over half of the white stripes here.
I have added over half of the white stripes here.
Now all the stars have been added.
Now all the stars have been added.

Keep stitching the white stripes to the flag until all six have been added. Personally  I love the way the flag looks with just the blue and white, but we need to add the red for the finishing touch!

Step Eight: Start Adding The Red Stripes

Begin cross stitching the red stripes on to the plastic mesh.
Begin cross stitching the red stripes on to the plastic mesh.

Each red stripe will consist of two rows of cross stitching, which add up to seven horizontal lines in all.

Step Nine: Continue Stitching The Red Stripes

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Here the red stripes are half way stitched.I am almost finished with the flag.The completed cross stitching of Old Glory is very glorious if I do say so myself!
Here the red stripes are half way stitched.
Here the red stripes are half way stitched.
I am almost finished with the flag.
I am almost finished with the flag.
The completed cross stitching of Old Glory is very glorious if I do say so myself!
The completed cross stitching of Old Glory is very glorious if I do say so myself!

Step Ten: Add The Magnets

Add the magnets to the backside of the cross stitched flag.
Add the magnets to the backside of the cross stitched flag.

Use scissors to cut off four small adhesive magnets and place the sticky side on the back of the flag.  However, I found that I also need to add a little bit of glue because the sticky magnets do not always adhere to yarn.  Allow your magnet to dry and soon it will be ready to use.  Make several American flag mangnets and have fun decorating for the Fourth of July!

My new magnet has joined the collection of handmade creations that hold papers up on my fridge.
My new magnet has joined the collection of handmade creations that hold papers up on my fridge.

Do you celebrate the fourth of July?

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    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      Hi WildEyes,

      I do not have any patterns like that, but you could easily make one by just drawing an angel picture onto a mesh cross stitch.

    • WildEyes profile image

      WildEyes 

      9 years ago

      You are so wonderful to take the time to share these things. I'm going to be looking at your hubs for something in particular, but I'll ask here, also. Do you have angel patterns that are pennies to create? I'd sure appreciate it if you could share what you have. Thanks. :)

    • ajm5050 profile image

      ajm5050 

      9 years ago from NY

      Nahhh.. I changed my mind, SweetiePie is perfect for you, so maybe we can settle for MacSweetiePie :)

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      ajm5050,

      You flatter me so :). My screename came to life back in December of 2006 when I was dreaming of pie on a cold night. I do like the MacGyver one, very neat!

    • ajm5050 profile image

      ajm5050 

      9 years ago from NY

      SweetiePie does not suit you very well, think MacGyver :) Another wonderful hub MacG.. I mean SweetiePie.

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      You will C.S. :).

    • C.S.Alexis profile image

      C.S.Alexis 

      9 years ago from NW Indiana

      The thing is I need to get my tail moving on it.

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      C.S. Alexis,

      Now you are one creative lady, so I am sure whatever you come up with will be great.

    • C.S.Alexis profile image

      C.S.Alexis 

      9 years ago from NW Indiana

      Sweetie I am trying to come up with something new for the 4th, nice job you did here, you beat me to it. I will have to squeeze my creative nerves to do something like you have for the 4th. Thanks for sharing, good job.

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      I am sure Europeans have just as much fun :). Besides you could cross stitch Jack Sparrows instead :).

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      Putting magnets on cross stitched pieces is something new I have been trying. Plus, it is a cheap way to create new fridge magnets.

    • cuttierish profile image

      cuttierish 

      9 years ago from USA / PHILIPPINES

      i love to cross stich, but i never made a one with magnet, before.. nice piece you got there.. great work...

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      Hi Melody,

      Canvas mesh cross stitching is easy and fast, so it is always a great activity for those easing into doing more intricate pieces, or those who just want to do something more simple. I love the simplicity of larger cross stitch myself.

    • Melody Lagrimas profile image

      Melody Lagrimas 

      9 years ago from Philippines

      That's cool! Haven't done much crossstitching lately. Advance happy 4th of July!

    • SweetiePie profile imageAUTHOR

      SweetiePie 

      9 years ago from Southern California, USA

      Thanks countrywomen. You are very sweet :).

    • countrywomen profile image

      countrywomen 

      9 years ago from Washington, USA

      WOW!! You are so creative. I wish I was half as creative as you are. Wonderful step by step instruction. Thumbs up.

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