ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Santa & Easter Bunny More Popular Than Jesus?

Updated on March 25, 2012
Christmas: everything fun & frothy & frivolous
Christmas: everything fun & frothy & frivolous | Source

Perhaps, like a number of your fellow citizens, you have marveled during various seasons of year why Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny seem to eclipse Jesus in the attention of Americans.

One simple explanation might be that we live in the here and now, on this planet Earth, and not in some otherly realm of past or future or eternity, or heaven or hell or purgatory or nirvana (or whatever). So, of course, we're going to tend to be more preoccupied with things of this earth, whether they be job or sport or food or family or school or hobby, than with things that may run deeper within us as a continuing undercurrent, like faith or belief or philosophy or truth. We will thus perhaps tend to devote far more time and energy and concern to the anniversary of the birth of our very own son or daughter, than to that of the reputed resurrection of an ancient prophet and messiah in the foreign culture of a faraway land. Each year, the commerce and festivities and paraphernalia surrounding Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny are right smack before us, in our own homes and towns and cities, and on the minds and lips and TV screens of almost all those near to us. It's therefore only to be expected that such constant hullabaloo would tend to crowd out other, more contemplative themes.

Another explanation lies in the very nature of religious belief: it is private and personal and unique and scared to the individual. What I think of or feel toward the historical Jesus (or an ever-present and eternal Jesus, if such exists) is my own, alone. It requires no explanation, and demands no explication. I should not feel compelled to share it or proselytize or define it or defend it. And I have no right to question or undermine or attack or defy your views of Jesus, either.

My views of Santa and the Easter Bunny, by contrast, have no such personal aspect or weight or import. They are commonly held and widely dispersed, traded in the marketplace of human commerce and social interaction, year in and year out. They are worn on the sleeve, so to speak. They become common currency, and are thus no more than common. I'd be happy to prattle on all day long with you about Good 'O' Saint Nick, debating his North Pole home, his nine faithful reindeer, his penchant for milk and cookies, and his disconcerting habit of entering private residences in the dark of night, unannounced, clandestinely, through chimneys, leaving booty of undocumented origin and sooty footprints on the carpet.

One final reason might be that Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny are shills for the world's hucksters. They lend themselves readily to propagation on pez dispensers, masks, decals, greeting cards, pajamas, candy, coloring books, costumes, floats, knickknacks, cupcakes, yard inflatables, and every conceivable size, shape and type of cheap toy or trinket. While I might feel some compunction about trying to sell you a candy-colored miniature plastic manger replicating the birthplace of Jesus, I'd have no hesitation hawking baskets full of plastic grass and pastel eggshells, or snow-domes of Arctic elven workshops.

So, why are Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny more popular than Jesus? One might just as well ask why The Hunger Games are more popular than The Pickwick Papers. Or NASCAR more popular than opera. Or Kardashians more popular than . . . well . . . anything else trite or trashy or trivial.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Levertis Steele profile image

      Levertis Steele 

      3 years ago from Southern Clime

      Santa and the bunny certainly generate more money during their seasons. The demands of children and accommodating parents are not hurting the market.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)