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The Value of a Good Book Editor

Updated on May 2, 2014

Speaking from Personal Experience

I’m the first to admit that I’m not Hemingway. I mean, I have a certain amount of game with regards to writing, but I’m not even in the same zip code as Dean Koontz and probably never will be.

Still, I was a classroom teacher for eighteen years, and I was educated by Catholic nuns who simply would not tolerate poor English, so it is safe to assume that I have some ability writing and that I can write with good grammar.

Well, that’s the problem when you assume. You make an “ass” out of “u” and “me.” Get it? Ass….u…..me…..assume!

I am on the final leg of my latest novel-writing experience. The manuscript for “Resurrecting Tobias” is in the hands of my editor, Jaye Denman, and she is doing her thing with my pride and joy. Now, for those who assumed that my grammar would need very little fixing, go to the end of the line and be very ashamed. The fact is that practically every one of my paragraphs in that 130,000 word novel needs fixing.

Talk about a lesson in humility!

Faced with that news, I really only have two choices: I can become depressed and quit the writing profession, or I can realize that editors exist for a very good reason, and that reason is that all writers are human beings.

We make mistakes! We get so wrapped up in the story, the character development, the rhythm and the flow, that quite often we completely forget the basic rules of grammar.

Enter the editor, and a good one is worth their weight in gold. Mine is a good one, and I highly recommend Jaye to anyone who is serious about fine-tuning their book. You can find Jaye on HubPages under the name JayeWisdom…..just follow this link.

So I thought today we would spend a little time looking at what editors do, and I thought we could use my manuscript and Jaye’s editing notes to do that. Are you ready?

The soon-to-be cover for "Resurrecting Tobias."
The soon-to-be cover for "Resurrecting Tobias." | Source

Into the Fire

I’m going to choose a passage at random and then explain the process.

“How many miles had I traveled? Several hundred thousand would be a safe guess. Four-seated puddle-jumpers through the Andes, jumbo jets skipping over continents, camel-back across deserts, kayaking down the Nile, crawling on my belly through the jungles while snipers with night vision zeroed in on body heat. All roads led to West Yellowstone, a mere eight hundred, fourteen miles from where it all began, a couple thousand to go and then what should have been, what could have been, what would have been, might actually be.”

Hopefully the red editing marks show up when I paste this to the HP format.

This passage is all about grammar. Four-seat became four-seated….several commas were added, 814 was changed to eight hundred, fourteen, and so on. This is a great example of the working relationship between a writer and an editor. All of Jaye’s suggestions were not necessary. I could have skipped a couple commas and the integrity of the work would have been fine….but…..I agreed with her and made the changes.

Now let’s take a look at another passage where the changes are more about content and less about grammar.

I am learning to accept criticism and help
I am learning to accept criticism and help | Source

The Author Cringes As Content Is Attacked

“On to Eugene for a night at the Starlight Lounge. The crowd seemed a little restless. Must be something in the air making the natives a bit edgy. Well, this first reading ain’t going to make them feel any better, and that’s for sure.

The crowd was classic Eugene. If eclectic is what you want, head for Eugene, Oregon. There you will find your Age of Aquarius burnouts. There you will find your suburban hipsters. Toss in hair of every rainbow color, piercings of every size and shape, roll it all together and you have Eugene. (BILL: THIS MIGHT BE THE APPROPRIATE PLACE TO PUT THE GIRL—PAGE 39—WHO IS WEARING HOT PINK AND HAS LOTS OF PIERCINGS. YOU COULD SWITCH HER WITH THE “PRETTY LADY IN THE PURPLE DRESS. YOUR CALL, BUT READ MY NOTE ABOUT THE OTHER AUDIENCE MEMBER.)

A question before I even get started. “Yes, the pretty lady with the Grateful Dead t-shirt. What can I do for you?”

“Toby, I am just thrilled to be here. I just want to know how much longer you plan on writing and giving readings?”

“That’s an easy one, darlin’. As long as there are people like you who are willing to sit down and listen to me.”

Thank you, ladies and gents. Let’s get started tonight with a piece I call “Somewhere in the World Right Now.”


You will notice Jaye’s note to me in the second paragraph of this section. She was referring to my description of the typical audience member in Eugene, and the fact that the audience member that I chose to ask a question did not originally match the Eugene description. Get it?

At this point in the editing process, I have a choice. I can either take her suggestion or ignore it. Is she correct regarding consistency?

It turned out she was absolutely correct, and you can see the change I made in the next sentence after Jaye’s note to me….the lady in the Grateful Dead t-shirt.

Let’s take a look at one other editing example.

Writing the book is only part of the greater picture
Writing the book is only part of the greater picture | Source

Jaye Greatly Enjoys Drawing Blood from Me

I say that while laughing of course. Jaye’s job is to make my manuscript the best it can possibly be. She has my best interests at heart, and I respect that greatly. Here is a wonderful example that just happened recently.

I added a couple paragraphs at the very beginning of the book. Jaye read it and came back with her own version. I can’t seem to find her note regarding this change, so I’ll just share the paragraphs with you, and tell you that they are a collaboration between the two of us.

“ I witnessed a stoning once upon a time. I was in Iran covering a political story. I had just left the Shah’s palace and on my way to the hotel I noticed a crowd forming in the public square. A woman, dressed in traditional Islamic hijab, was buried to her shoulders, and ten men stood about twenty feet from her and they were throwing stones at her. The stones were about the size of a football, or maybe slightly smaller, and all had sharp edges. The woman had several cuts on her face by the time I arrived, and the pain was obvious, but she did not cry out. Stone after stone hit her head, and the cuts increased, and after about fifteen minutes skull appeared, and then brain-matter, and her blood flowed down to the dust turning it red under the scorching sun.

Hundreds watched the spectacle as though it were entertainment, many nibbling on fruits, some drinking from tiny porcelain cups, sustaining their bodies with fluids as the young woman’s fluids mixed with the dirt and her life ebbed.

That shit will stay with you once you see it. That shit will alter the course of your life and put you on a path you never envisioned when you were a youngster playing Kick the Can. It did for me, and my writings today reflect those moments when mankind’s brutality overshadows all advancements made in the past two hundred thousand years.”

An Important Point to Remember

I’ll let Jaye’s words explain this final point:

“Remember, Bill, it's your manuscript and you make the choices about which editing to keep and which you don't want.”

At the end of the day, the important thing to remember, as a writer, is that you are the one who makes the final decisions. It is your name attached to the book. You are the one who labored for months to make an idea a reality, and you are the one who will have to ultimately be happy with the result.

Your editor can only make suggestions. Whether you follow those suggestions is your decision.

I hope these examples give you a better idea of the process involved in editing, and also the importance of a good working relationship between author and editor.

Best wishes as you travel your own path!

2014 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

“Helping writers to spread their wings and fly.”

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    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 3 years ago from Arizona

      Interesting topic. WHen I hired an editor after finishing my last book, I thought I hired a really good one. The publisher was very unhappy with the outcome. I personally went over and made a huge amount of changes. And of course editing does not come cheap... However doing your own is not a good idea either. I am not convinced that having a focus group read the manuscript is not enough. After all writers have a pretty good sense of structure and grammar. I also depended on her way too much which was really wrong. I like the information you shared here and it makes good sense

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 3 years ago from Northern California, USA

      Your editor is the type of editor I enjoy. She's strong. She goes for the gold. At the same time, she recognizes that it's your "baby" and you can do what you want. Being a former editor, I would still hire a professional editor to edit my work for me.

      You're such a tease, Bill - using excerpts as examples. I'm more excited to read your novel.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, I think a focus group can, indeed, catch most mistakes, and you are certainly correct that editors are not cheap. At this rate, I can't afford to write too many books. LOL

      Have a great weekend and thank you as always.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Marlene, I highly recommend Jaye...and I highly recommend using excerpts as teases....that way we aren't blatantly shoving our novel in our friends' faces on Facebook daily. :)

      Have a great weekend my friend.

    • midget38 profile image

      Michelle Liew 3 years ago from Singapore

      We all need one. No matter what, we always end up writing the way we speak. The mannerisms just cut in!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Very true, Michelle....very true!

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 3 years ago from Missouri

      Just another example of how good you truly are. You create then have the ability to listen to someone on how to better your work. Guess I am too thin skinned at times; I am only able to accept criticism from a select few on how to create better works; and you are foremost among them.

      Every hub I read of yours I learn something new. Thank you for that Bill. And in a Yogi-ism I'll say I never knew what I didn't know but now that I know I know I need to know more! Take care Sir William. Blessings upon you and yours.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 3 years ago from Central Florida

      Editing is extremely important before putting a book before the public eye. However, as you say, the editor makes suggestions but the ultimate decision belongs to the writer. One beautiful thing about writing fiction is grammar doesn't always have to be to the letter, especially when the characters are speaking.

      Consistency is key. It's important to keep track of small details. For instance if one of your characters favors his right leg due to an injury, you don't want him to support himself with the left in a subsequent chapter. Readers pick up on the little things when they identify with your characters.

      It looks like Jaye is doing a fine job of editing your novel. Just remember, as hard as it is for the writer to accept criticism, it's just as difficult for the editor to point out weak areas or suggest a different way of saying something. The editor needs to be careful not to offend or come off as harsh. All in all, the author/editor relationship can be exciting and enlightening for both sides of the partnership.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, you had me laughing with the Yogi-ism, and it is true. Truth be told, I'm pretty thin-skinned too, but there are some people who prove themselves to me and I will then listen.

      Have a great weekend buddy and thank you for your kind words and friendship.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      You said it all, Sha! There is no reason for me to add anything to your comment.

      Have a great weekend my friend.

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 3 years ago from Hudson, FL

      So cool that you shared this. You demonstrate how crucial it is to cast the ego aside and look at your work objectively. Looks like Jaye is doing an awesome job, and putting a lot of thought and consideration into her comments.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Lizzy, she is catching stuff I never would have seen, and she's doing it in a gentle manner. Thanks my Dunedin friend.

    • profile image

      hlwar 3 years ago

      I whole-heartedly agree with the value of an editor or beta-reader! Working with mine was such an eye-opening experience. She really brought forth everything I needed to become a better writer, plus polished whatever work was thrown at her. XD

      As always, thanks for a wonderful article! (´ω`★)

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      hlwar, thanks for your input. That's a great way to word it...an eye-opening experience.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 3 years ago from USA

      I'm sure Jaye has made a good piece of work even better.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Flourish! We can only hope at this point. :)

    • David Warren profile image

      David Warren 3 years ago from Nevada

      As I am avidly working on my first book your advice here on HP is priceless. I was also lucky to have been educated in a great school system

      in a time when grammar still apparently mattered. However I would never rely on my own ability after investing so much time writing. I'm not sure but I believe it might have been Stephen King that said something to the effect of,

      "To write is human, to edit is divine"?

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      David, I have heard that quote, but didn't know who said it. Whoever it was, and it sounds like something King would say, they were right on! Good luck with that book of yours.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 3 years ago from The Caribbean

      This is the kind of illustration a good teacher does--teaching from your own experience. You're a very good teacher and I'm grateful for the writing and editing lessons I have learned from you. Waiting for the book!

    • WiccanSage profile image

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 3 years ago

      Nice! My daughter wants to go into editing. She got her AA degree and is working for a year or two now before going for the BA. She likes writing but could never do it for a living, but when it comes to editing she has a great eye for catching mistakes and figuring out problems. She helps me sometimes with my work (not my hub pages, but my regular work), and by the time she's through I've usually cut it by 1/3 to 1/2, and it always bugs me at first but she's always right-- it produces tighter writing with a greater impact. A good editor can be an invaluable investment.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      This just goes to show how choosing the right Editor is so important, and as you said she is letting you keep the bits you like because its your baby, this is great advice billy, and good luck with the book! nell

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dora, I greatly appreciate your loyalty to me. I hope my book does not disappoint you. I think you will approve of it.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Wiccan, thanks for sharing your experience. Tighter writing indeed...I learned that during this editing experience.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Nell! It's been a fascinating process and it's almost over.

    • parrster profile image

      Richard Parr 3 years ago from Oz

      Thanks for this Billybuc. Writing success really is a road of many contributors. From those that listen to our ideas, to friends who read first drafts and proofread, to editors and marketers. Still, it's a hard thing to hand over ones baby to critique. Vote up and useful.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 3 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Bill, thank you for giving us this glimpse into the production of your book. it feels like we're all Godparents to your baby. :)

      Can't wait to read Resurrecting Tobias.

      Have a fun weekend, my best as always.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      I for one am thrilled to hear more and more about your editing process--please continue to share--

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Audrey, and I will do that as I continue.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 3 years ago from Wales

      Thank you once again Billy and as Nell says how great to have found an editor who values you well also. Another wonderful hub Billy. Keep them coming and wishing you and Bev a great weekend.

      Eddy.

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 3 years ago from North Carolina

      Bill,

      Like you, I was an educator for many years. In fact, though probably questionable by some of the HP readers, I actually taught English.

      Perhaps, because of my own sensitivities, I tried really hard to edit with love all of the (way too many to even count) essays I read by students from all backgrounds and abilities. I can remember using phrases such as "You might want to consider...Did you mean to repeat this word, phrase, sentence?" Since that time, I have edited materials for professor friends and still try to be ever so careful in making suggestions. One professor friend is working on a book, and I felt that to strengthen the plot a particular change needed to be tweaked. Still do not know what he has decided to do regarding my suggestion.

      Finally, I am so glad you wrote this piece for it is presented with humility and grace. Our work is such an important part of ourselves and it is hard to allow others make changes, and yet it is such a critical piece of the process. There are so many times when I have published only to see afterwards, errors in the piece. I am also quite sure there are plenty of the errors in plenty of my works solely for the reasons you point out. When it comes to our own writing, it is so easy to become so close to it that we can't see it as clearly as others who are not as invested in it as we are. THUMBS UP! EXCELLENT WORK!

      Kim

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      parrster, it is a very hard thing indeed. This has been a somewhat painful process for me, but I'm managed to swallow my ego and learn along the way.

      Have a great weekend my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I couldn't ask for bettter Godparents. I know you'll take care of my baby and give him/her love. :)

      Have a wonderful weekend, Jo, and thank you always.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Eddy! I always appreciate your visits.

      Enjoy your weekend my friend.

      billy

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Kim, thank you as always, and you raise excellent points. Criticism is never easy to take, and I know from my teaching days that there is a good way to be critical and a bad way. I will listen all day to constructive criticism delivered in a proper manner. I will listen for about 30 seconds to criticism delivered poorly.

      Thank you my friend. Great points!

    • vkwok profile image

      Victor W. Kwok 3 years ago from Hawaii

      Thanks for sharing this Bill. I know that there will be things I'd want to change in my own books, and have.

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Hi Bill, you are a wise man to use an editor, as we all should. It is so important to realize that when we are so close to our writing it is possible to read something so obvious to others, then for us not to see such a glaring mistake. You have a great editor there, as you are aware. Excited to read the finished product.

      Blessings always

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 3 years ago from southern USA

      Trying to pin and tweet, but it keeps saying "whoops" ... will try later.

      Blessings

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      Even though I've done my share of editing, this is a very helpful hub. There are always new things to learn, and this was an opportunity for me. Your hubs are great and never fail to dissappoint.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you vkwok!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hi Faith! I enjoy working with Jaye as we both tiptoe through the manuscript. It is a fun process for me...as for Pinterest, that happens from time to time. Thank you for trying.

      blessings on this Sunday

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you so much, grand old lady. I know you speak from experience and I appreciate it.

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      Billybuc,

      I seem to have trouble placing your articles on my Pinterest account. I keep them there so that when I edit my book, I look at your pieces to make sure that I can follow your instructions. The folder I keep your pieces in is called "My book".

      Do you think it's Pinterest' fault, or do they reject hubs now?

      One other question -- my compost grew so big I put it in a large plant pot that has no hole in it. Now I'm thinking maybe I can grow a palm tree in it. However, if the pot has no hole, will that be bad for the plant? Does that mean I should just water it less often and let the excess water evaporate?

      Thanks,

      Mona

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mona, I think the problem is with Pinterest. That happens occasionally and then they work it out. It's just a quirk in their system

      As for the pot, it needs to have a hole or you will get mildew and the plant will die. :)

      bill

    • grand old lady profile image

      Mona Sabalones Gonzalez 3 years ago from Philippines

      Oh, thank you Billybuc. I just put your piece on my Pinterest account. It turns out, you have to put it on a picture, not the Pin it button.

      Thanks for the advice re the pot. I guess I'll just continue with my compost there and when the soil is good transfer it to other pots to seed. I have lots of free pots with holes that became coffins for dead plants:(.

    • profile image

      Jane Arden 3 years ago

      Without a doubt we all need an editor. I have learnt that from your previous lessons on 'how to be a successful writer?'. You are such an accomplished writer and teacher Bill. If you need it, then def. we ALL do. I can't wait to get hold of a copy of this book of yours.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 3 years ago

      Clearly, you have the best of both worlds in your choice of editor. Voted up, very useful, extremely interesting and awesome.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mona, that's the way to do it. You don't need very much compost for a pot.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jane, thank you my friend. I hope the book does not disappoint. Nice to see you back among us.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      breakfastpop, I chose wisely and thank you. Have a great week.

    • epbooks profile image

      Elizabeth Parker 3 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

      I think you're on the right track with your editor. I think if you received your manuscript back without any red marks, I'd be a little worried. It's impossible to edit your own work- it's not even fun to edit your own work- so having an editor who has your best interest at heart is definitely a commodity. I'd rather see red marks from an editor before the book was published than from the public AFTER it was published!! I'm sure your book is written wonderfully and will be a huge success!! Good luck!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Liz, you said it perfectly. I have nothing to add to your comment and no red marks. :) Thank you!

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      Without an editor publishing a book will be very difficult. An editor takes a big load off your shoulder and you have a great editor. Great hub, useful and informative as always. Voted up.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vellur! I appreciate your thoughts on this.

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 3 years ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Good editors are worth their weight in proverbial gold. I still make silly mistakes that I am embarrassed to “catch” after doing several cold reads. When will I ever learn? Thank you for this invaluable hub!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Genna. I just found a mistake yesterday on the sixth read....sigh!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 3 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Great insight here and so interestingly explained to the point and with such helpful information it shows more value to ones work.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you again DDE. I hope you enjoyed your time off.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 3 years ago

      When I get to the stage of needing an editor, I will have to read this article again. It puts a little bit of fear into a person to realize someone is going to pull your work apart. However, it is what will help one to write well and know what may need improvement.

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 3 years ago

      I think it would be so interesting to be an editor and I bet not everyone is receptive to the changes/corrections suggested. I am constantly finding mistakes in my hubs which makes me believe I would find a lot more in a book I wrote.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, I agree, not everyone would be receptive. It's a painful thing to have your baby sliced and diced. :)

      Thanks, as always, for stopping by.

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 3 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      You have certainly convinced me!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 3 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glad to hear it, Deb. Thank you!

    • JayeWisdom profile image

      Jaye Denman 2 years ago from Deep South, USA

      Bill - I don't know how I missed this one weeks ago unless it didn't show up on my HP feed, but it was a pleasure to read it today.

      Thank you for your kind remarks about my editorial efforts. (I think I'm blushing.) It was a pleasure to work with you on your latest book because RESURRECTING TOBIAS was, and is, a superlative novel told by a master storyteller.

      I realize that seeing red ink on a manuscript into which you've poured your heart and soul is not any writer's idea of fun, but the editor's goal is to help polish a book for publication while maintaining the author's unique writing style and voice. Bill, you were always open to my suggestions, which makes an editor's task so much easier.

      Your published book, with its splendid cover art that grabs a potential reader's attention, now holds a place of honor on one of my bookshelves, and even though I read it several times during the editorial process, I look forward to reading it again from the pages of the book, this time for pure enjoyment.

      The powerful saga of Tobias, who slips on his meteoric rise to success, faces disaster and forges his very personal path to redemption deserves a huge audience. I hope each person who reads your book tells every one of his or her friends (both in person and on social networks) that this book is a 'must-read.' Word-of-mouth promotion is amazingly beneficial to the success of a book. ( Don't be shy about suggesting that to your fans. The novels of award-winning author Louise Penny sell like hotcakes because her fans vigorously promote each one.) I won't be at all surprised when RESURRECTING TOBIAS earns a place on the bestseller charts.

      Jaye

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 2 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jaye, you are so very kind. Thank you. Only time will tell if Tobias is recognized and word spreads, but I'm proud of the story and I'm proud of the Tobias in each of us.

      Again, you did a wonderful job with the editing and I really appreciate the kid's glove approach. I never really felt pain in making suggested corrections, and that is because of you.

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