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Microstories

  1. sasanqua profile image83
    sasanquaposted 6 years ago

    I've just published a hub with a collection of microstories, and it got me thinking...what makes a good microstory? I'm interested to hear from hubbers who have written microstories or enjoy reading them.

    1. Betty Reid profile image61
      Betty Reidposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I like stories with action and surprise.

    2. wixor profile image60
      wixorposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I would say mystery is the key. That way the reader can fill in some blanks themselves, and create their own ending.

    3. cdub77 profile image84
      cdub77posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I like both suggestions here and agree with them.  Another thing I try to do in my "vignettes,"  which I believe I use the same way you use the term "microstory" after reading your hub, is to leave a striking image.

      In other words, I paint a picture and, like Wixor said, allow the reader to fill in the blanks. 

      Since words are a commodity in short pieces, I also concentrate on diction and sentence length.  I save the short sentence(s) for my most provocative image or powerfully emotive/symbolic language. 

      I try to use as many elements of tone/diction/syntax/imagery/and symbolism in conjunction with one another as I can to strengthen/reinforce what is essential. 

      I enjoyed your hub as well.

    4. Ben Zoltak profile image85
      Ben Zoltakposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I like the different ideas being batted around here. .. my short stories/vignettes/microstories are good if they are inventive...and they're great if they are bursting out at the seams - dynamic. It seams in some ways the shorter the story, as long as it retains some sense of cohesion, the more potent the anecdote. Too short is too short but I enjoy these "stabs" at creativity.

      1. wixor profile image60
        wixorposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Yes, it's a bit like poetry. You're putting as much emotion into each word, or sentence, rather than focusing on paragraphs. Of course, less can mean more as well.

        Even with a paragraph, you're still looking for a plot, a little dialog, or interaction with characters and maybe a twist at the end.

        I've even heard of one sentence stories; I'll try one here.

        [i]The old man sat on the porch, reflecting on his long life, and welcoming the peaceful feeling that was now with him.[/]

        Was he dying? Or even dead? Or just tired.

        1. wixor profile image60
          wixorposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Oops, didn't close the tag properly.

          The old man sat on the porch, reflecting on his long life, and welcoming the peaceful feeling that was now with him.

          Was he dying? Or even dead? Or just tired.

          1. Ben Zoltak profile image85
            Ben Zoltakposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Very cool wixor, I enjoyed that.

        2. cdub77 profile image84
          cdub77posted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Here's an idea to show a different way this can work than Wixor's excellent example, I purposefully avoid (as much as possible) all the things Wixor listed as important for this to work:  plot, dialog, interaction, or ending with a twist:

          The head dwarfs the living trees of the forest that surround it, and upon it's blackened ancient brow the word devil has been carved backwards.

          The question driving this sentence isn't what must be included to make something work, but rather, the question is how to think about the traditional rules of what to include so as to make them tools for your muse, not limitations.  Microstories/Vignettes are a great place to explore this type of thing as well.

    5. Cardisa profile image93
      Cardisaposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Intrigue and a twist!

 
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