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The houses I love

Updated on March 4, 2012

My current goals are to get back to basics. Technically, I am not supposed to make any major decisions for another 6 months to a year. This is the recommendation after a huge, traumatic event in order to avoid regretting mistakes made. I, however, am weird. I do not carry regret and am a pretty clear thinker, so I am looking into moving and downsizing. The real inspiration for this decision is my daughter. I am giving her the biggest and most meaningful gift that I can give. I am bringing her closer to her father and his family, who love her very much. The loss of my husband, whom she loved made her worry for her father. She wants to spend more time with him. To me that is noble. It is worth the nightmare of moving.

I never really cared to much for any particular home style. I didn't have a dream home. It just needed to be comfortable. I always considered the people (and dogs of coarse) in it to be the 'home' feeling. The structure was nothing more than that, a structure. I didn't have any requirements for a home other than a fence. I would walk it and see if it was roomy, had good storage potential, and was in a cared for neighborhood.

So, I go to this new area of Florida about 90 minutes from where we live now and I meet my first historic home. Wham! It hit me. The feeling that people talk about when you love a house. I didn't think it existed. If I find something, this will be the fourth house I have lived in after all. Of coarse, being me, I have to love the riskiest homes to own. Historic homes are old. I mean really old. The one pictured here is a 1920's home. Every single home I loved was built in the 20's. Big huge sigh! This is not a bad thing. It's just that I am not in the position to own such a home. I would have been able to get the home pictured for a great deal and it is an awesome little house, but I don't have the funds to fix it.

It looks great I know. Honestly, this home may out live a lot of newer homes. I am not afraid of that. This home is in wonderful condition. The problem really is the insurance. Here in Florida, older homes are difficult to insure. In order to obtain insurance, the home must pass a four point inspection (Roof, Electrical, Plumbing, and Structure). If flaws are found everything has to be fixed immediately. This beauty needs a new roof, updated electrical, termite treatment, and siding work. This is easily a $20k job. Guess who can't put that into a newly purchased home? Then, of coarse things will surely come up with the home down the road, the a/c is on the older side etc. These things would not worry me if I had the means, but I am not the type to take these risks unless I am properly prepared. Now is about the worst time for it and for me. No worries tho, I am not discouraged. I know that I will have to let this one go and get a newer home. A historic home may not be in my future any time soon. It is nice to know that I have a style preference, even if it is the style of home that I can't possibly have right now and requires more TLC. I guess it goes with my personality. I am a TLC kinda girl sometimes.

I tested this to make sure. I have seen 8 historical properties and loved 7, 2 were my favorites. I have seen a huge amount of newer homes, too many to count, and have loved 1. We saw a historic home yesterday. It also had roof problems, evidence or termites and mold, dry rotted wood on the outside, and more goodies and I was behaving like I was in my perfect place. I guess this makes me complicated. I would do all the work myself, except the roof, if they would give you time to fix things and not require all problems to be addressed immediately. Then there was one by a lake. So cute, but it needed a ton of things. Sigh, perhaps when my little girl is on her own, I can revisit this. Then if the home falls apart, it is only me. I am pretty cool, I have to say. I know plenty of people who will take me in. :D

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    • Moms-Secret profile imageAUTHOR

      Lissette 

      6 years ago from Central Florida

      Wow, 1800! That is an artifact! I am sorry to hear about the timing and stress you are currently in because of it but I agree with you, safety is of gross importance for you now. There are many who would see an opportunity in your new role as a widow, both 'business' people and criminals alike. Precautions are necessary and I am happy that you saw the value in the discomfort that you had to go thru to get it done.

    • profile image

      desert bunny 

      6 years ago

      Wow I am glad to see that I am not the only one interested in old houses. The one I have now was built somewhere in the 1800. I have a picture (very Old) of it where the men were still posing with their horses tied infront of the old home. Also a contracter got hold of it and put in new steel windows but basically inside the front part stayed the same. Yellow wood floors and a yellow wood staircase going upstairs. the back of the house was built on later. I actually also had some changes made now but not because I wanted to I just had to get the old house more safe for me as my husband passed away last July and the crime rate is ever increasing. One of the store rooms used to be a horse stable. These houses just have something the newer places don't have. Atmosfere. Fantastic. Also the rooms are so spacious and cool in summer. The actual change of the house was and still is as they are still busy with it - very stressful for me. I had to get an architect as a project manager as I did not know anything about building and he had to supervise the contractor and also had to draw up the plans to fit in with the old house. I feel is was to soon after my husband passed away but I realy did not have much of a choice. So I can understand why they say do not make any major decisions to soon.

    • Moms-Secret profile imageAUTHOR

      Lissette 

      6 years ago from Central Florida

      Good morning Frank. Thank you for reading and stopping by. :)

    • Moms-Secret profile imageAUTHOR

      Lissette 

      6 years ago from Central Florida

      Hey Becky. Thanks for clearing that up for me. See I was in the military and a galley is horribly industrial. I didn't know they made it more homey looking with wood. I still don't like it from your description. I can't believe they would get rid of the glass cabinets, I LOVE THOSE!

      The bright side to your story is that now you can say that you are glad the house is no longer in the family. If it remained beautiful, you would probably wish you had it like I do with the old gems in the hub.

    • Frank Atanacio profile image

      Frank Atanacio 

      6 years ago from Shelton

      Moms-secret thank you for sharing this Hub.. :)

    • Becky Katz profile image

      Becky Katz 

      6 years ago from Hereford, AZ

      It wasn't industrial and it was wood but instead of a nice big kitchen, a galley kitchen is just wide enough for you to squeeze by someone else. They are not big enough for two cooks, so if your daughter was going to learn how to cook there would not be room.

      Her kitchen had been big and spacious with plenty of room for people to pass each other in. Room for several cooks and a table. It also had big cupboards with glass doors. They were so pretty with all the different colored dishes in there. They turned that into the dining room and made a kitchen and bathroom where the dining room had been. The bathroom was turned into a little bedroom and the s2nd bedroom on the bottom floor, they split into a larger master and a bathroom. The house had 2 bedrooms upstairs also and they did those nice but I did not like what they did to the first floor.

    • Moms-Secret profile imageAUTHOR

      Lissette 

      6 years ago from Central Florida

      I can't begin to understand how much I love the older homes. I do like some modern touches but I can't imagine going all modern in one. I wouldn't change the floor plans at all. I would just do nice, space saving cabinets and more modern closets. In the 20's, commercialism was not as big of a plague as it is now. Most people had 3 or 4 sunday dresses and a modest amount of clothing which means small closets. I would also invest in metal roofing and siding to eliminate a lot of the future maintenance issues. I am not a chef and I don't love cooking so galley kitchen's in any home are not attractive to me and I like wood. There is something about all the silver that is too industrial.

    • Becky Katz profile image

      Becky Katz 

      6 years ago from Hereford, AZ

      I am laughing with you. I also love older homes. They have such character and will outlast anything that is being built today. I learned to love old homes when I visited my grandmother. She had a gorgeous old Victorian. When she died, a contractor bought it and remodeled it. I do not like it anymore. True, it now has a roomy master suite and the bathroom is modern, but I liked the old clawfoot tub. I liked the kitchen that was big enough to put a table in and walk around it. It now has a skinny little galley kitchen. He ruined that house.

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