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Milk For $2.79 A Half Gallon: Am I Nuts?

Updated on September 9, 2016

At the Farmers’ Market

So there we were a couple Saturdays ago, my wife and I, manning our booth at the Puyallup Farmers Market, selling goat cheese and quail eggs, trying desperately to stay cool in the ninety-five degree heat.

Puyallup, by the way, is a city in Washington State, for those of you unfamiliar with the left coast, and it is about twenty miles from our hometown of Olympia, the state capital, for those of you unfamiliar with state capitols.

But I digress!

I was talking to a customer about an hour into the market when I spied, from the corner of my eye, my wife walking across the aisle to another booth. I finished up my discussion and looked across the way to see Bev chatting with a gentleman in the Smith Dairy booth.

I thought nothing of it. Part of the charm of farmers markets is meeting other vendors and chatting with them about their products.

A half hour passed and finally Bev returned to our booth holding an order form, and that form had writing on it, and that writing was, in fact, our order for dairy delivery starting next week.

Dairy delivery in the land of Safeway? Do they still do that?

My childhood home in Tacoma
My childhood home in Tacoma | Source

Wonderful Memories

The older I get the more time I spend thinking back to my childhood. Is this the beginning of senility, I ask?

Tuesday mornings! I’m not sure why I remember the specific day, but I’m sure it was Tuesday. Early….like an ungodly hour, in the five a.m. range….a time when anyone with an ounce of common sense would be sleeping. From a deep sleep comes the sounds of glass clinking on glass, feint at first, then increasing in volume, and finally a chorus of clinking followed by silence.

Mister Thompson delivered the milk!

And back to sleep I immediately went.

Ten years later Piggly Wiggly opened up a mile from our home. Fifteen years later Safeway invaded our little corner of heaven.

And the Tuesday morning chorus of clinking ended.

Next Wednesday, at 1828 Fir Street in Olympia, Washington, the clinking will resume.

I am unnaturally excited!

Local farmers and artisans
Local farmers and artisans | Source

Scanning the Receipt

So Bev returned to our booth and handed me the order form/receipt, a big old smile on her face, and she told me she had ordered home delivery, and I smiled, a veritable booth of smiles, until I read that milk cost $2.79 for a half gallon.

At our closest Safeway, a mile from our home, we can get a gallon of Lucerne milk for $2.99.

$2.79 for a half gallon??????

Very cool!

That’s right, I said very cool, and would you like to know why?

Because I believe in that clinking of glass from years gone by!

Local production
Local production | Source

Here’s the Thing

Does anyone know where Lucerne Dairy Farm is actually located?

I had to do some research. It turns out Lucerne Foods has its headquarters in Boise, Idaho, but I guarantee you will not find an actual farm just outside the headquarters window, so where are all those cows that produce all that milk?

Here, there, and everywhere is the answer to that inquiry. Lucerne contracts out with various farms across the country to produce milk under the Lucerne label, and they are quite proud of the fact that those milk-producing cows are hormone-free.

So I did some more research and lo and behold, not one cow under the Lucerne banner is raised in Olympia, Washington.

But every single one of the cows under the Smith Dairy banner is chewing its cud in our area, and that makes all the difference in the world to Bev and I.

Localism!

Local economy
Local economy | Source

National Politics

I’m about fed up with the Presidential elections of 2016. How about you?

And one of the reasons why I’m so fed up, aside from the pure nastiness of the whole shebang, is because I know in my heart of hearts that neither Clinton nor Trump give a rat’s patootie about the health of the economy in Olympia, Washington, and I’m willing to bet they aren’t too concerned with the quality of food served here as well.

So if the Presidential candidates don’t care about the general health and welfare of my neighborhood, and by extension if the Federal Government doesn’t care, then I guess it falls in my lap to see to it that I do my part to support localism.

Can you hear the glass tinkling?

It’s a Choice I Am Making

I’m not selling so I don’t much care if you’re buying what I’m talking about here. I’ve heard all the excuses why people succumb to the lure of the cheap price. I get it….really….why pay an extra two bucks for a gallon of milk when that two bucks can be spent on cigarettes or booze? I understand completely.

I’m being facetious so don’t get your knickers in a knot.

But the point is this: it’s all about choices! To my wife and I, supporting the local economy is important. We believe an economy is only as healthy as the willingness of its citizens to support it, so we buy local far more often than not. We pay a little extra at farmers markets for local produce. We try to buy other items from independent stores that only carry products made locally.

Yes it is difficult. Believe me when I tell you we are, at best, lower middle-class on the economic ladder. We are not floating in excess disposable income. We wouldn’t know a 401K if it bit us in the ass. The trickle-down economic system is a tinkle down instead, as in getting peed on, so this decision of ours is a tough one and requires some sacrifices…..

But we believe it is worth those sacrifices!

In search of better times
In search of better times | Source

It’s Interesting to Think Back

So, while I was thinking about those milk deliveries of long ago, I was thinking about other changes that happened just about the same time. Just about the time Safeway invaded our neighborhood, the first shopping Mall was built in our city, and it wasn’t long after that, downtown Tacoma dried up and almost blew away. Just about the time Safeway advertised low, low prices, McDonalds opened up in Tacoma, and the 25 cent burger was introduced, and fast foods replaced long hours of cooking, and the pace of living seemed to noticeably increase, and family meals diminished in number, and the new catch word, spoken first in whispers but then shouted from the rooftops, was CONVENIENCE, and Lordy my Lordy, here we are in 2016 pissing and moaning about the sorry state of this world.

I don’t know what to make of all those weighty issues. There’s some right smart people paid big bucks who have my best interests at heart. I just know they do, because they’re our representatives, right, so I don’t worry too much about politics and the such. Big government will take care of me, right? And big corporations care about my welfare, right?

And the tooth fairy is real!

Me, I’m just waiting for Wednesday, and the beautiful sounds of glass tinkling against glass.

2016 William D. Holland (aka billybuc) #greatestunknownauthor

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    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I like that, Lawrence. We support the local bakery as well and my goodness, their bread is delicious!!!!

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 11 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Bill

      It's the wife who has to do the gf thing, and it's for medical reasons. As for me, she won't let me eat it as it's three times the price($7 a loaf for gf opposed to $2 a loaf!)

      But don't despair, the bread I eat is baked in a bakery less than two miles from my home and made with locally milled flour!

      I buy it from the bakery shop, but even when we shop at the supermarket the shop is also locally owned.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Lawrence, and I have tasted gluten free bread...but only once and never again. LOL I'm glad you found that local baker...what a savior!!!

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 11 months ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Bill

      By now you're enjoying the wonderful taste of 'local' milk. Just the thought of it sounds great.

      A few months ago some of our family had to go 'Gluten Free' have you ever tasted the gf bread in the big supermarket? It's like bloody cardboard!

      We found a baker here at the local farmers market who makes a great one, it tastes like cake! and he does local deliveries (couriered to your door at 5am the day after you order!)

      My wife does a weekly order!

      Great stuff. Keep it up.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 11 months ago from Olympia, WA

      That is the drawback, Shannon, and it's one I certainly understand.

      Thanks for spending so much time with me today.

    • shanmarie profile image

      shanmarie 11 months ago

      Alan Jackson and "The Little Man" comes to mind. It definitely seems more appealing to shop locally. If I could afford to, I would do it more often.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I hope so, Suhail. We need more farmers in this world. I truly believe that.

    • Suhail and my dog profile image

      Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent 12 months ago from Mississauga, ON

      Super-awesome article that touched so beautifully on viability of economics of localism in an historical context.

      It may surprise you, but the milk got delivered back home (in Pakistan) till 1970s by milkmen using bottles. Actually, the first learning of my religious book was by our milkman, who used to deliver eggs and bread as well. I think that was a carry over from colonial practice though.

      My brother and I keep thinking of starting a farm, but keep it delaying due to one reason or another. Your several articles written on urban farming, as well as this one, will definitely help us in that direction.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      yarddog2k, I love your comment about hating it and then growing to miss it. Yes, I think farming is very much like that.

      Thanks for your reflections.

    • yarddog2k profile image

      Troy Yarbrough 12 months ago from Texas, USA

      Wow! You've really brought back some memories of my childhood on the farm. My grandparents raised my little brother and me on a working farm. We grew our own produce, raised our own beef, pork, and chicken. We also had 8 to 10 milk cows that I had to milk every morning and afternoon, as well as gather fresh eggs from our laying hens. We always had an abundance of fresh milk and eggs, so my grandmother would sell that abundance to a few select customers. So, when I was old enough to drive a vehicle, it was also my job to deliver milk and eggs to our customers.

      I hated having to "do chores" and all that hard work on the farm. Now that I'm grown and the farm is gone, I miss it and wish I could go back in time. Thanks for the great story and the memories.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Bravo, Eric. I'm with you all the way on that kind of thinking.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      That's one thing I remember, Dee, is the value of service back in those days....there was none of the rudeness we see today from customer reps...thanks for mentioning that.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 12 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      I had to come back. Just yesterday I bought a whole gallon for 2.39. We have a small child. I told my wife I just could not do it anymore. I just cannot put a premium on feeding him better foods. It will hurt my pocket book but that is a whole lot better than hurting my soul.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 12 months ago

      I enjoyed your interesting and creative share on milk and politics. I remember when the milk man, the egg man, and the baker came to our home. It was exciting as a kid to watch them deliver. They were men who knew the value of good customer service. (And I'll bet your farmer's milk is much better than the store bought product.)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Vellur. I love that we can still have milk delivered.

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 12 months ago from Dubai

      Great to support local market. Gone are those days of home-delivered milk but am glad it is still flourishing over at your place.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      We do for sure, Larry! Every little bit helps.

    • Larry Rankin profile image

      Larry Rankin 12 months ago from Oklahoma

      We sure need to get back to locally sourced.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Alicia, that seems to be a favorite memory of many people, the cream at the top. Thanks for sharing and for being here.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, thanks for those great memories. Exactly what I'm talking about. I would expect more of this in the outlying areas of Brazil and really, in some small country towns in the U.S.....it's the larger metropolitan areas where work needs to be done.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Sis, I can live with your answer and yes, it just might have been more memorable. I love that you remember the names of the milkman and Fuller Brush man. LOL You left my memory in the dust with those revelations.

      hugs from Olympia, Sis, and thanks always

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 12 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      You've got me thinking about my childhood, Bill. I loved eating the cream at the top of the milk! Buying fresh and locally produced food is great, as long as it's reasonably accessible and affordable.

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 12 months ago from Brazil

      Hi Bill,

      Both in the States and in the UK we had milk delivery. I too loved the clinking of those bottles, it made me realize I hadn't died overnight. LOL

      If we weren't quick, the blue tits (a small UK bird) would perch atop the full cream bottle and peck a hole through the foil top to get at the cream.

      Here in Brazil, we had a neighbor who had a few cows. I would get in our VW Kombi and drive down the sandy road to his place. He would be walking back to his house with a pail full of warm milk. His wife would give me a wonky chair to sit on while I waited for him to put it into a plastic bag which he had an electric sealer for. If he ran out of bags, he would find an old Coca Cola bottle which had been thrown away in the sand, give it a rinse, and then proceed to fill it with an old plastic funnel and cup. Alas he has sold his cows so we are back to UHT (long life) milk.

      We try and buy local here in Brazil, where possible. I have purchased fish off the side walk just across from where the fisherman's boat was pulled up onto the sand. Fruit from some selling it a bus stop and eggs from other neighbors. If we ask around someone knows somebody who is slaughtering a cow, pig or goat at the weekend. The key is flexibility.

      Our local corner shop buys from people in our neighborhood and resells it. You never know what to expect in there. We used to sell her 100lbs of tilapia every week. They were out of the lake and in her freezer in 10 minutes!

      I think we all need to take a step back and reevaluate our buying habits.

    • cclitgirl profile image

      Cynthia Sageleaf 12 months ago from Western NC

      My parents used to have milk delivered - it was good stuff! :)

      And...you know, I think about my childhood a lot - it's such a part of who we are: those memories get seared into our heads at a young age!

      Sigh...I love the present, and I love dreaming about the future, but I don't like how life is like a roll of toilet paper: it starts out slowly and gets faster and faster as it gets toward the end! I swear! LOL.

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 12 months ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Si, hermano mio....I learned we must create our own personal heaven. If we wait for it to happen or for someone else to create it for us.....we are really much too late!

      Of course we had a Fuller Brush man!! That was "Bob" & he was married to my mom's cousin, so his visit called for coffee & chit-chat about the family. (beat the hell out of Face Book info!)....My parent's Insurance man, "Smitty" ~ even he came by monthly to collect their premium! I liked Smitty. Tall, roly-poly, sweet man in a white shirt & tie who reeked of Old Spice & spoke softly. I don't know if it's funny or crazy that I can pull up such vivid recall from more than 50 years ago.

      Ya think maybe life in general was simply more memorable back then? That's my answer!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Hey, Sis, thanks for sharing about Bill North. I would have like him. We had a Fuller Brush man too....how about you? I still remember him lugging his big suitcase of products down the street, going door to door selling cleaning products...he smelled of mothballs. LOL

      Comfort and peace in one small corner...sounds like heaven to me, Sis!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm beginning to think that's the truth, Pop! At least this is something I can control.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Shoot, Jackie, I guess I've been out of touch. Get better soon, my friend. I hope all that surgery business is behind you.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you for the kind compliment, Dora, and thank you for also supporting localism.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Great story, Blossom. Frightening but great now that it's in the past. Thanks for sharing. Glad I helped with Puyallup.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks again, Kim, and I love your big blueberry smiles. :)

      bill

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 12 months ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Home delivery of milk~~a real blast from the past! I too remember it well. Our milkman was "Bill" (believe it or not!) Mr. Bill North. I still see him clearly and I can hear him too! He whistled non-stop as he went from house to house....a really happy, friendly man, all of 5'2" and wiry.

      Those were the days. Alas, all gone now and replaced due to what's known as progress, I guess.

      I try to shop local from what few stores & businesses we have. As I drive through our quiet Village area, it's a sad sight to see more empty, closed buildings than those with an active store front. Times sure change.

      For me, it's all part of feeling secure and living in "my little corner" of the world.....a world gone far too mad to give me comfort! Peace Bro!

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 12 months ago

      You are much better off clinking those luscious milk bottles than worrying about this nation. One is delicious, the other useless.

    • Jackie Lynnley profile image

      Jackie Lynnley 12 months ago from The Beautiful South

      Thank God people are still allowed to sell their healthy goods, well in some places still, anyway. I, too, just have what I want now and then or a certain brand just because why not? We only live once on this earth and we better enjoy freedom to do as we please while we can!

      Too many surgeries these last months to get into raising or doing too much on my own but am hoping I will be bionic woman come another summer!

      Great to hear you are still at it and enjoying life!

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 12 months ago from The Caribbean

      I think I mentioned this before. I really admire you and Bev for being the sensible pacesetters you are in so many areas. Such great mentors! I show similar support for people who invest in local products.

    • BlossomSB profile image

      Bronwen Scott-Branagan 12 months ago from Victoria, Australia

      I'm glad you explained about Puyallup - at first I thought you'd made it up!

      I, too, bewail some of the benefits of times past. They were great folk who got up so early so we could have fresh milk for breakfast - also community spirited. Once we were awakened by our milkman knocking in the front door - with our 18 month old in hand! Apparently she had climbed out the window, and over the gate - and he had found her up the street. Those were the days!

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 12 months ago from North Carolina

      Bill,

      I am not sure I can claim farmership for I have been blessed with the supervision of true lords and ladies of the land. My time on the farm was an attempt to try to salvage some sense of peace and calm, with the added bonus of just plain 'ol "green" education. I will return to my permanent home in late fall, but so happy to have fruits of my labor and education to take back with me.

      Big Blueberry Smiles,

      Kim

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Kim, thanks for sharing those great memories of your family's general store. How cool is that? and now you're a farmer? I'm absolutely green with envy, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Audrey, I used to love to skim that cream off the top. Great memories....I wonder why we don't have that anymore? the cream on the top? Is it consider unsanitary?

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Early 60s for sure, Mike, and I love that it is making a comeback. Makes me feel like we just might be headed on the right path. Thanks for stepping into the fray.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Great memories, Marlene, and your statement that we spend a little more on the front end to save on the back end is right on and very, very accurate. Thanks for sharing that with us.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I love your memory of the farm....and it's high time we all gave this some thought. We can all do more, my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Meg, you are so correct. This has to happen for small communities to survive and for larger cities to grow....we are all in this together.

    • ocfireflies profile image

      ocfireflies 12 months ago from North Carolina

      Bill,

      I LOVE this hub! While, I can only faintly remember the milkman and his deliveries (not sure if there were any milkwomen deliverers), it is a fond memory nonetheless. Plus, I can relate to times changing when the big supermarket came in because at that time my parents owned a general store outside the town limits (gas, groceries, feed and fertilizer). We not only worked in the store, we lived in the apartment undeneath the store. Even though it has been many years since my parents sold it, and it has stood vacant for many more years, I feel a certain sadness because soon it will be torn down for a four-lane highway is on its way. Thank you for this hub. On a side note, having lived on a farm the last several months, I have gained even more appreciation for the work involved in raising one's own fresh vegetables. In fact, I planted 70 tomato plants, 30 pepper plants and have enjoyed the fruits of the harvest many times over. And look forward to this winter because I know where that can of green beans, frozen corn and many other canned vegetables came from.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 12 months ago from Nashville Tn.

      The Kerr family, including Audrey June, used to scramble to grab the delicious bottle of milk left at our door and skim the cream off the top.

      Yummy!

      Local shopping is the only way to go! It's organic, great tasting and we all need to support our local growers.

      Thanks for sharing your story - I love how this brings me to my own trip down memory lane.

      Hugs,

      Audrey

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Linda, I often thing things were much simpler when I was growing up. I wonder if that's true? We do have technology now with all its wonders, but still....I don't think "convenience" equals simpler all the time. :)

      Have a great weekend my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Aw, thanks, Sha, and yes, that milk definitely tastes better to me. I don't think it's my imagination at all.

    • mckbirdbks profile image

      mckbirdbks 12 months ago from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas

      Hello Bill - What a hardy meal you dish up here. There are so many avenues to take. Rather than jumping in the deep end, just let me say, I remember milk deliveries. Not to our place, but the truck in the area. Even bakery trucks would come around. That would have been the early '60's.

      As for politics - it might be time to check the distance from the borders.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 12 months ago from Northern California, USA

      I am absolutely in love with the idea of buying locally. Everyone benefits. It might cost a little bit more for the food, but fresh is better for our health and the healthier we are, the less we will spend on medical bills. I truly believe that. I'll spend a little more on the front end to save on the back end. I remember those days of having the milk and eggs delivered. I also remember the drive-up windows for buying bread and other produce. We didn't even have to get out of the car to get our groceries. Grandma only used this service for milk and eggs because she liked to touch and smell the fruits and vegetables. Memories!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 12 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      My buddy Joe Zanzuchi's family had the dairy farm. Really cool at 4am and 2 degrees helping getting his dad ready to deliver. My dad the health director said their sanitary conditions were deplorable -- but by golly that family farm got all our business. thanks for bringing back the memories. time a gave this some thought as to application in my own life.

    • DreamerMeg profile image

      DreamerMeg 12 months ago from Northern Ireland

      I'm with you 100% of the way. Add in the cost of petrol to go and buy your milk plus the cost of your time and that delivered milk is really cheap. Localism in everything is going to have to happen even in energy supplies. It's coming and the sooner, the better.

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 12 months ago from Washington State, USA

      Bill, I enjoyed this trip down memory lane. You and I come from the same place, same time, and share many childhood memories. How I wish we could turn back the clock--life seemed so much simpler. I whole-heartedly agree with buying local; I can buy produce at Safeway, but would rather drive a bit more and get better/fresher at the corner produce stand.

      The milk delivered to your doorstep will be so much sweeter.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 12 months ago from Central Florida

      Excellent article, Bill. I love the slick way you looked at politics and government at the end. Honestly, I didn't see it coming. Well done!

      And I'll bet the milk that clinks its way to your belly will taste a whole lot sweeter going down than the commercial products that are shoved down our throats via inhumane treatment of animals.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Maybe not, Flourish, or maybe she is. Just one man's opinion.

      Thanks for stopping by, as always.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      MizB, you always make me laugh..."thank God I'm allergic to milk!" LOL Thanks for the story about CC....I love that you support local.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you, Letstalk, and you are right, it tastes delicious.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Buildreps, that would be somewhat of as shock, I would think....a shock one could laugh at for years afterwards.

      Thanks for sharing that great story.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Now that is quality control right there, Cardisa! Thanks for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh yeh, Clive....some buns would be nice. :)

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 12 months ago from USA

      I support local too as much as I can but I stopped drinking milk after learning more about the practices behind it. I'm much less cynical about Clinton not caring. She's not socialist Bernie but she's not as bad as you make her out to be.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      MizBejabbers 12 months ago

      All I can say is, thank God I'm allergic to milk! I do, however, get your point and agree wholeheartedly with buying locally. You will be getting a much fresher product, too, than one shipped from across the country. We used to go to our local "The Rivermarket" religiously until we found out that much of the produce comes from CA, GA, TX, Mexico and other foreign (to us) zip codes. Now we wait until we know that local produce is coming in, and we ASK where it is from. We can hardly wait for the Cave City watermelons to come in. Folks were selling so many counterfeit CC watermelons, that Cave City started putting their own stickers on them.

      Good article, friend Bill. Glad to see you support your local businesses.

    • letstalkabouteduc profile image

      McKenna Meyers 12 months ago from Bend, OR

      I love this. As the world grows bigger and more bureaucratic and more impersonal, it feels good (and empowering) to make a small stand on your home turf. We have so little say about what's happening with big government, but we can still make a difference locally. I know that milk will taste better to you than any other milk you've drunk, Bill. Enjoy!

    • Buildreps profile image

      Buildreps 12 months ago from Europe

      I read your article slowly and carefully to get your point. Then suddenly the coin dropped! Yep, I agree. Totally. The price is as good as here for local organic milk, about [...recalculate...please wait a moment...] $2.5 dollars per gallon for local produced milk. And that is purchasable in the supermarkets as well. Fair deal.

      Oh boy, about that glass milk bottles of the old days. My old man told me a story about how he greedily sucking on the bottle, a glass bottle, felt something falling on his lips. The bottle was almost empty (do you hear it gurglin'?). It appeared to be a starfish. Not a plastic one, no, a real one... How did it got there? Maybe a playing child on the beach, and perhaps was the bottle not well cleaned enough? The sand could be washed out but the starfish was stuck? lol. Poor starfish.

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      Carolee Samuda 12 months ago from Jamaica

      I agree with you Bill. Support your locally raised cows and drink milk you are sure comes from naturally fed animals. Luckily the milk we consume comes from the farm about 7 miles away and we see those cows everything we pass the farm.

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      Clive Williams 12 months ago from Nibiru

      makes me wanna go get some fresh cold milk and some bun right now

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Eldon, great memory! We had a local hardware store like that, with popcorn in a glass machine for a nickle a bag, and me following my dad around, feeling like a real man. LOL Thanks for that, buddy.

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Manatita, bite your tongue, my friend. I'm not sure I can remain sane if Trump holds office for eight years. LOL

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Wow, Nell, your memories are more vivid than mine. No way do I actually remember the milkman's name. LOL

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzie, exactly. It's being a part of the local markets that got me thinking about how good they are for our local economy and community. Right on, Irish!

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      Eldon Arsenaux 12 months ago from Cooley, Texas

      I had a similar thought standing in the vast corridors of Home Depot yesterday. I remember going to the local hardware store with my dad as a kid. Like a vacation. Eating popcorn as we perused the compact halls. But I have hope that the tide will turn. That we will localize. Who knows how soon? Or if at all. But the price of paying for local goods is bigger than a pricetag, to me. Have a great weekend Bill!

      -E.G.A.

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      manatita44 12 months ago from london

      Ha ha ha. The Government cares about you, Bro. (smile) Perhaps Trump will get in and the good from this will be that America becomes so tired after 8 years that we get a seismic shift towards the Light! (chuckle) fat chance? Don't know, Bro.

      Milk, eh? Enjoyed the way you wove that story. Great one for me. Have a great evening, Bro.

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      Nell Rose 12 months ago from England

      You brought back memories there Bill! I used to love running out to the milk float and getting eggs and cereal as well as the milk. we used to have a tall skinny long red haired guy that was called brian! lol!

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      Suzanne Ridgeway 12 months ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Good for you guys! I too try to support the local traders especially since I have been trading at these markets myself. I remember when we used to get our milk delivered and clink of glass bottles now replaced by the plastic 1,2 or 3 litre containers in the supermarket aisles!! Have a great weekend Bill xxxxxxx

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Mel yes, it was right about that time, all right! I miss those times and I'm determined to find a way to return to at least a part of that former sanity.

      Thanks so much. It's nice knowing I'm not alone.

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      Mel Carriere 12 months ago from San Diego California

      My knickers are all knotted up now. About the time those changes in your neighborhood occurred was about the time people stopped talking to one another and the art of conversation vanished forever.

      My Grandma used to take her empty milk bottles to a drive up dairy and exchange them for fresh milk. You could see the cows being milked right through the window. Great job, my friend!

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Sally, I don't know. The milk we get doesn't, but I miss that, now that you mention it. I wonder why that is, that it doesn't have it anymore?

      Great story about the duck. You had me laughing out loud. LOL

      Thanks for spending part of your Friday with me.

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Jackclee, thanks for the suggestion of books. I'll pick it up soon.

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      Sally Gulbrandsen 12 months ago from Norfolk

      Oh yes, local is great, if you can get it. I actually recall being detailed off to walk to a neighbour to pick up a gallon can of milk from a neighbour over the road and having to return to fetch a duck. I hung onto the darn thing whilst she did you know what right down my front with me crying the whole way home. I also recall the little birds which used to pick at the aluminium foil to get to the cream below. Does milk have cream on the top anymore? You remember the stuff which one could scoop off the top with one finger and ............slurp.

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      Jack Lee 12 months ago from Yorktown NY

      Excellent point about support of local produces. I am a big fan of EF Schumacher whose book "Small is Beautiful" talks about the beauty of localization. Keep up the good fight.

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Good morning Lions and thanks for sharing. It's good to hear from another I-5 neighbor.

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      Bill Holland 12 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, good for you, my friend. Buy local and we all win. Thanks for taking the time and Happy Friday to you!

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      CJ Kelly 12 months ago from Auburn, WA

      I did not know Smith was still operating farms. I used to live near their Kent facility and it was always a treat to drive right down West Valley seeing their hundreds of heads. But I have to admit, I'm not a fan of their milk. I tried. But I like Darigold better.

      Oddly enough, I spent a summer as a milkman in the Bronx, it was a little scary at times. However, I was a fan of the product.

      Sharing.

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      Janine Huldie 12 months ago from New York, New York

      Love this and agree totally worth it by far in my estimation, as well!! Happy Friday and thanks for making m smile here today more than you know!! :)