jump to last post 1-2 of 2 discussions (12 posts)

Nixon and Reagan were more corrupt than you thought

  1. profile image0
    Sooner28posted 4 years ago

    http://www.alternet.org/tea-party-and-r … page=0%2C0

    http://consortiumnews.com/2013/03/07/oc … -and-argo/

    This is written by a journalist who was involved in breaking the Iran Contra story.

    My distrust for politicians and state power increases by the day.

    1. habee profile image96
      habeeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Yeah, I'm pretty sure they're ALL more corrupt than we'd like to think.

      1. profile image0
        Sooner28posted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Massively corrupt politicians make me sympathetic to libertarianism.

        1. habee profile image96
          habeeposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          For real! I think some politicians actually seek office for lofty reasons. When they're surrounded by power and opportunity, however, corruption usually follows.

          1. rhamson profile image77
            rhamsonposted 4 years agoin reply to this

            I agree and the lure is to go along with the flow to get their particular bill passed. Before they know it they are wrapped up in the corruption of the whole affair. After that there is the next term to raise money for and they are caught forever.

  2. innersmiff profile image75
    innersmiffposted 4 years ago

    The next step is to come to the realisation that politics is fundamentally corrupt by nature wink

    1. profile image0
      Sooner28posted 4 years agoin reply to this

      There's anarcho-socialism tongue

      1. Stacie L profile image91
        Stacie Lposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        As some as stated, power corrupts. It's human nature to be corrupted?...or did they start out that way and take advantage of the authority granted them?

        1. innersmiff profile image75
          innersmiffposted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Perhaps a little of both. Murray Rothbard says that individuals have propensity for good and for evil, and the way society should deal with this is to create an environment that incentives good and de-incentivises the bad. The state, therefore, as an apparatus of absolute power over others, should not exist.

        2. profile image0
          Sooner28posted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Most sociologists, political scientists, psychologists etc etc etc are with Rothbard.

          Institutional structures are the major determinants of behavior.  Adjust the institutions, while giving people time to acclimate, and the behavior will change also.

          Are you familiar with the Milgram experiments from the 60s?  Or the Stanford Prison experiments from the 70s?  If so, that's a perfect example of what I am saying.  If not, check them out and tell me what you think.

      2. innersmiff profile image75
        innersmiffposted 4 years agoin reply to this

        Which is fine by me. The anarcho-capitalist and the anarcho-socialist society could co-exist peacefully, I think.

        1. profile image0
          Sooner28posted 4 years agoin reply to this

          Theoretically anyway tongue.

 
working