This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (6 posts)

What might be some of the ways you would advocate for education?

  1. davenmidtown profile image87
    davenmidtownposted 6 years ago

    What might be some of the ways you would advocate for education?

  2. shea duane profile image61
    shea duaneposted 6 years ago

    In my state, NJ, our governor has declared a holy war against teachers and education. In think a great way to advocate for education is to elect people who will not rape school districts.

  3. Rachael Nolting profile image61
    Rachael Noltingposted 6 years ago

    I think one of the biggest problems with education today is that the youth of America take it for granted, they view it as a right, not a privilege.  One of the biggest things I would do is to illustrate for them just how crucial education is and how useful it is to every single future career path.
    --Advocating for education?  I would start in a big way with lawmakers and the fact that they make laws for the classroom, but none of them have ever actually been teachers.  They make assumptions about what it is like, but they don't really KNOW.  I would make it mandatory that all laws that would influence the classroom have actual teachers as advisers for the draft process, because the teachers would have legitimate insights and respectable, intelligent opinions.
    --We should also make the salary competitive, it isn't sufficient for a family to live on, much less a teacher with an actual degree that probably has student loans to pay off.  Better salary=competition=trying harder to receive positions=more qualified candidates=better taught children.
    --I would make it mandatory that a teacher have at the very least a bachelor's degree in education.  I'd also make sure that every teacher can take of special needs students and challenge gifted students.  There are wide ranges of ability in every single classroom, and teachers have to work with, accommodate and help every single student grow.
    --I think just talking about this, advertising and making the populace realize just how challenging the job actually is would be a huge rise in awareness and respect for the position that a teacher actually holds.

  4. profile image0
    Larry Wallposted 6 years ago

    I have been out of school for a long time. But we need to update, not the way we teach but what we teach. I remember in the fourth grade spending two weeks studying Greenland--Why?

    In the fifthgrade we study American History and was told about Paul Revere's ride to warn the colonists that the British Were Coming--he got caught.

    In high school, we barely got to World War 1 before the year ended. A lot had happened between the end of that way and my graduation. A lot more has happened in the last 40 years.

    In eighth grade I had to learn the name of every Louisiana Governor going back to the Louisiana Purchase--there were a bunch. Pick out the important ones and tell me about them, teach me how to look up information about the rest of them.

    In college, I graduated as a Journalism major. Why would I need callus, advance physics and other courses that colleges say students need. Teach the basics and give the students the opportunity to figure out what they want to do. If the miss a course in high school, they will find a way to cope.

  5. ib radmasters profile image60
    ib radmastersposted 6 years ago

    I would support a major reform of education from K through 16.
    The current system is still based on a system developed hundreds of years ago or more.
    There has been much more information today than in the past, and the information of tomorrow will be even greater than today.

    So I would target education to getting a job, a better job than one without an education. I would have business and industry fashion the target of the education that they are looking for when they hire help.

    I would also encourage the option to go to private schools as well as public schools. The public schools could be the core path, and the private schools could be the specialization path.

    I would say that the core would be language, math, and applied science rather than theoretical. Both core and specialization would incorporate using computers and technology.

    Also with the increasing class size I would encourage online education to at least augment actual physical classrooms.

    K through 10 would be the equivalent of K through 12 today. Grades 11 and 12 would be equivalent to junior college. College would then only have to be two years instead of three or four.

    To do this the current curriculum would be streamlined to replace non essential subjects with more of today's more specialized technology. General education courses like history can be offered online, or as an elective. Whereas computer science would be a core subject.

    When the Greeks and the Romans started our current education paradigm they were for the rich who were bone idle and academia was their way fo impressing their higher standing on the uneducated. Today, is considerable different, and te majority of the population competes for a limited number of jobs.

  6. prettynutjob30 profile image92
    prettynutjob30posted 6 years ago

    When I was growing up education was one of the most important things to me.Kids today seem to focus less on education,and more on partying this is a catastrophe.They are suppose to be our future,and over half of them can't even speak the English language properly.

 
working