Do you think Common Man will benefit from affordable Obama care?

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  1. easyime profile image40
    easyimeposted 4 years ago

    Do you think Common Man will benefit from affordable Obama care?

  2. mgeorge1050 profile image78
    mgeorge1050posted 4 years ago

    I think Obama care will eventually help the 'common man' by providing cheaper insurance.  If you really look into the healthcare plan, you would see that a penalty must be paid by those who don't have health insurance each year.  I am sure that some insurance companies will eventually offer insurance at or near the cost of that penalty.  When there is money to be made, the insurance companies will figure out a way.

  3. profile image52
    tbHistorianposted 4 years ago

    NO - the Affordable Care Act (obamacare) will never benefit "Common Man".  It will never provide better healthcare because it does not stimulate improvement or advancement of medical care. 
    Obamacare is simply an attempt to create a single-payer program for insurance that will never benefit "Common Man".  Through the single-payer program, the government will decide what is good for the individual.  This means that the government will then channel all assistance through a non-medical staff based on money calculations only.
    Currently this is handled by the non-medical staff in the Veterans Affairs Hospitals, and everyone knows the failure of these government institutions.  The same will be true of the failure of obamacare for the "Common Man".
    The best thing for the "Common Man" is to assert self-control and self-sustainment.  Through the power of the individual, each "Common Man" would then achieve full healthcare based on their own needs.
    Freedom is the only path to fairness. 
    So, any government interference will restrict this path.

    1. wba108@yahoo.com profile image80
      wba108@yahoo.composted 4 years agoin reply to this

      Well said sir, Obamacare is a form of socialism which only bring about the equal sharing of misery

  4. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 4 years ago

    It depends on how you define "common". The vast majority of Americans get health insurance through their employer. The Affordable Health Care Act is designed to provide insurance for those who presently do not have healthcare. When those people end up getting sick or require emergency help the tax payers foot the bill.
    Some good things about the bill is it allows parents to keep their adult children on their insurance up to age 26, a person can't be turned down for insurance because of a pre-existing illness, and if the pool grows big enough it would reduce the overall rates for those who never had insurance and need it. Having said that the vast majority of working Americans will continue to use whatever insurance their employer offers. This insurance bill was primarily designed to insure the estimated (24 -40 million) people without insurance. We won't know how well it works until the states set up exchanges and accept the federal funding. Some states are refusing to give their citizens that option. Obamacare is essentially Romneycare  nationally.
    I suspect 20 years from now it will be looked at the same way we view Social Security. Not many people will want to abolish it. There was a major battle fought in getting Social Security and Medicaid too.

  5. wba108@yahoo.com profile image80
    wba108@yahoo.composted 4 years ago

    Obamacare will not work well as seen by similar programs in other countries or even on the state level. Universal healthcare is expensive as seen in Canada where it current cost is almost half of Canada's Gross National product. In Great Britain you can see first hand the extreme lack of quality care and a shortage of care providers. Its a fearful thing to need care in a government run Hospital in Great Britain. People often come out with serious infections because of poor sanitation. Because of the shortage of providers, those needing serious care often sufferer or even die waiting to get an appointment. Waiting lists often are over a year.

    The fallacy of socialized medicine is the same fallacy as socialism. There's little incentive for providers of medical care to improve their services and little incentive for people not to overuse medical care. This may not seem like a big deal until you multiply its effects a million times over which is exactly the case when the federal government controls the healthcare industry.

  6. LandmarkWealth profile image80
    LandmarkWealthposted 4 years ago

    There is no chance at all.  The entire law was poorly designed and even more poorly implemented.  Putting aside the fact that far more people have already lost insurance as a result of this legislation than have actually been insured, that is only the beginning.  This legislation is only going to accelerate an already troubling trend of medical professionals who no longer accept insurance anymore. Americans are terribly confused between the concept of insurance and actually receiving care.  This trend will make it even harder for lower income "common men" to receive quality care from the Dr of their choosing. 

    There is one constant we see when the gov't becomes a market participant rather than a market regulator.  Prices get distorted...quality goes down...accessibility becomes limited...or all of the above. 

    What's even more incredible is how many times the impact of this legislation was predicted...and it has essentially happened exactly as the Presidents critics suggested it would.

    Ultimately I believe this will result in one or two outcomes at some point.  Either the people will wake up and demand real reform that allows market prices to determine cost as we once did before the mid 60's when Dr's largely dealt directly with patients.  Once we deviated from that approach by listening to a bunch of politicians promise us fiscally unsustainable programs, prices began to spin out of control.

    Or, if we continue to follow that trend, we'll get an even wider disparity between how the wealthy and the poor have services allocated. Eventually, the system will be nationalized. The poor will get even more nominal and rationed service, and those who can afford it will just buy private coverage like they do in Europe.   Eventually people will forget that the US was once a place were citizens from all over the world flew to obtain procedures that were inaccessible in their home country.  And we will just get used to the gov't providing us with a lousy service, because that's what our citizens will be born into without knowing any better.  Eventually people can become dependent and accepting of the worst of services.  Just spend 6 hours online at the DMV in NYC and you'll notice nobody really says anything about it anymore.  They just accept the misery.

    1. wba108@yahoo.com profile image80
      wba108@yahoo.composted 4 years agoin reply to this

      You are exactly right, quality care for the common man will be non existent and even more so in the future as the defects of a nationalized healthcare system become clear along with  its unsustainable costs!

 
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