Have you ever changed your voting plans based upon a presidential debate?

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  1. dashingscorpio profile image88
    dashingscorpioposted 3 years ago

    Have you ever changed your voting plans based upon a presidential debate?

    Do you believe any presidential debate could cause a conservative to vote for a liberal or vice versa? Are these really "sporting events" for voters to cheer for (their team) whenever their "person" gets off a zinger or their opponent falls into a "gotcha moment"? Do people vote for the "party's agenda" or for the candidate? Are debates really for the "Independents" or "swing voters" and not for the masses?

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  2. profile image0
    Stargrrlposted 3 years ago

    No, if anything, my reasons for voting for whoever I voted for were reinforced because of what my preferred candidate said.  Usually, the candidate you chose will fight for the things, or at least promise to fight for the things you believe in.

    1. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Most people in my opinion tend to stick with a (party) based upon it's promises. This probably makes the (primary) debates more important.

  3. Kathleen Cochran profile image80
    Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years ago

    No.  By the time the presidential debates are held between just two candidates, everything  I could possibly know about a candidate I already know from the debates during the primary process.

    1. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree it's almost as if the debates between candidates during the (primaries) for the nomination of a candidate for each political party is more important than the presidential debates!

  4. cathylynn99 profile image79
    cathylynn99posted 3 years ago

    a friend was going to vote for bush, sr. when he lied several times in the debate, she changed her vote.

    1. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wow! I think that's very unusual.
      Most people generally vote according to a political party's platform/agenda.

    2. Kathleen Cochran profile image80
      Kathleen Cochranposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I think people often vote more against one candidate than for another one.  I had several conservative Christian friends vote for Romney (Morman) instead of Obama (traditional Christian) in spite of what was supposedly their prioritiy: religion.

    3. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I agree with you Kathleen. I have a view that if I do not vote, then it is the luck of the draw & have to accept that. Therefore, I have voted on issues on the ballot & at times not voted on the choices for an office. I didn't prefer any one

    4. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Kathleen, odds are your (conservative friends) were going to vote for the Republican candidate no matter who the Democrats put forth. I can't imagine a conservative voting for a liberal unless they were angry.  They'd rather not vote at all!

  5. pagesvoice profile image84
    pagesvoiceposted 3 years ago

    I can't recall having a debate change my mind about a political candidate. If anything, debates seem more a pep rally for the candidate of choice. The viewers sit in their armchairs cheering or booing. We eagerly await an "I got you" moment that might happen to the person we disagree with. I suppose there are some occasions that might give us pause, but most likely we've formed an opinion long before the actual debates take place.

    1. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      " If anything, debates seem more a pep rally for the candidate of choice."
      Very true!

  6. tsmog profile image82
    tsmogposted 3 years ago

    I did not change my vote, however I got really angry with a leader and the sound bite. That sound bite was costly alienating many voters. Sadly the media presentations have that much power today. I place more faith and trust in the party of choice for cause to vote than I do in the representative leader on the podium. Personally I am willing to change my vote, yet it will take more than a debate for that occur.

    Yes, I do believe a presidential debate could cause a person to realign their vote. Yes, they are like sporting events for some, others it spawns thought becoming inspiration to look further into what one may feel a disagreement with seeking the who, what, where, when, why, how, and how much. I guess I have a lean toward the party agenda while may have strong reservations at times. I would lean that the debates are for the swing vote, yet that is not necessarily independents as history points out.

    1. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      I believe most voters in the end vote according to what each party (claims) to represent. The debates during the primaries for that party's candidate seem to be more important than the presidential debates. However you may not like the one chosen

    2. tsmog profile image82
      tsmogposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Agreed. Also, with my own experience the party I originally supported is not the same as then. I can accept change, however I am not sure if that party is willing to accept change. Like the song by Kansas shares 'Dust in the wind'.

  7. M. T. Dremer profile image95
    M. T. Dremerposted 3 years ago

    The thing about the debates is that they usually come so late in the election cycle, that there is virtually no wiggle room left. By the time I watch them, I've already learned each candidates views and made up my mind about who I'm going to vote for. I still enjoy watching them (like a 'sporting event' that you mentioned) but it has never changed my mind. Nor do I think it will change anyone else's. Unless there is a gaff so big that it destroys the candidate (which is extremely rare).

    1. dashingscorpio profile image88
      dashingscorpioposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Presidential debates do come off much like  playoff games for politicians. As I noted (the primary debates) are probably more meaningful if a person plans to vote along party lines but hasn't decided on which candidate to represent their party.

 
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