jump to last post 1-3 of 3 discussions (6 posts)

Why has the National Debt Clock gone down in recent months?

  1. FitnezzJim profile image82
    FitnezzJimposted 12 months ago

    Why has the National Debt Clock gone down in recent months?

    Screen captures from Usdebtclock.org from December 16, 2016 and March 26, 2017 show that about a $90 billion decrease in their estimate of the United States national debt.

    What explains this?

    The picture shows the capture from December 17, 2016.

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/13323437_f260.jpg

  2. FitnezzJim profile image82
    FitnezzJimposted 12 months ago

    An since the mini-picture is difficult to read, the numbers are below.

    December 17, 2016 - $19,940,878,419,520

    March 26, 2017 - $19,853,908,950,754

    1. Perspycacious profile image80
      Perspycaciousposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      It is growing steadily again, and some leaps and bounds" are coming.  April will see a showdown about the debt ceiling and shutting down the government.  Don't expect the Democrats to up the spending limits now that they are not doing the spending.

    2. FitnezzJim profile image82
      FitnezzJimposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Ha!  Funny, and hopefully not true.

      And you know?  I can easily see President Trump exercising a veto if not enough folks in Congress agree on it.

      Given the pace Congress works at, that might be a cost cutting alternative.

  3. Perspycacious profile image80
    Perspycaciousposted 12 months ago

    Revenues increased and expenditures temporarily decreased.  Congress is not spending as fast, federal jobs are being reduced by attrition, government fines and fees have grown, and some high paying positions have yet to be filled (cabinet posts, judges, etc.) Departments have also been instructed to reduce their waste.

    1. FitnezzJim profile image82
      FitnezzJimposted 12 months agoin reply to this

      Do we still expect the national debt to reach $20 Trillion in 2017?

 
working