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On Which Hand Should This Ring be Worn?

Updated on December 28, 2010

Why the Fourth Digit?

Have you ever wondered why we women wear our wedding bands on the fourth digit of our left hand? Why don't we wear them on the right index finger or perhaps on the pinky or forefinger, which I believe would be just as nice? For example, I wear two wedding bands, one on my left hand and one on my right, which I always thought was a little untraditional but I wanted to show appreciation and love to both my husband and my mother. So, just out of curiosity, I decided to find out which hand was most appropriate for the one given to me on my wedding day. Therefore, I did some research on the Internet and was astounded at what I found.

Right or left, it doesn't matter

According to an article on Wikipedia (2010), the first wedding bands were traditionally worn by wives only (sorry guys). It seems that many men during ancient times were lords of harems or owners of slaves. Back in ancient times all a man had to do was grab a woman, band her, and she was considered to be married. Therefore, rings were often seen as a sign of ownership, not love or unity, thus they believed they had no use for wearing them. However, their wives were allowed to wear them on the fourth digit of either the left or right hand. It wasn't until much later that women began to wear them on the left hand.

But why the fourth digit of the left hand?

The earliest wedding bands were not worn on the finger at all, and most were not even made of gold, silver, or any other metal for that matter. For example, in the ancient Egyptian and Roman eras, one's life expectancy was very low and many believed that a person's spirit could flow out of their body at any time, thus ending their life forever. To prevent this, many believed they could keep the spirit intact and in the body by wrapping twigs and grass around the extremities. Still others believed that a vein ran through the fourth digit of the left hand and lead directly to the heart (although Science has since been quick to disprove this theory). This vein was called "the Vena Amoris (the vein of love)." And because of this, many people naturally assumed this was the most logical placement for the wedding band since it was a symbol of love, unity, and life itself. Thus, the fourth digit became known as the "ring finger." Although this was very romantic, many were still made of grass, twigs, tattoos, metal, or whatever was available or fashionable at the time. It wasn't until after the colonization of America that the wedding ring as we now know it became fashionable for women*, and even later (during World War I) for men (LoveToKnow.com, 2006-2010).

Okay, but on which hand will I wear my wedding ring?

Although it does not really matter which finger I wear the rings because they are just symbols, I will continue to wear the ring I was given when I married on my left hand as a symbol of my love and devotion to my dear husband, and I will continue to wear the other on my right in remembrance of my loving mother, the one who made it all possible. Besides, I love wearing them because they are beautiful and each bears a lifetime of precious memories. Thank you.

* This tradition may have also began when Puritan wives were given thimbles on their wedding day because they did not believe in giving or receiving gifts of monetary value, and eventually these were cut down and made into wearable items (LoveToKnow.com, 2006-2010).



References

LoveToKnow.com (2006-10). History of the wedding ring. Retrieved from

http://weddings.lovetoknow.com/wiki/History_of_the_Wedding_Ring

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2009). Wedding ring. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_ring

Comments

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    • Deerwhisperer profile imageAUTHOR

      Brenda K Krupnow 

      5 years ago from Ravenden, AR

      That way they are both in my thoughts all the time. Thanks for the compliment, it is really appreciated.

    • frogyfish profile image

      frogyfish 

      5 years ago from Central United States of America

      Interesting history of the ring and the finger chosen. I think it is very nice that you wear your two rings for your husband and your mother.

    • profile image

      Laura 

      7 years ago

      Great article. My husband and I have been married 15 years. He wears rings but not a wedding band. I wear a signet ring with our initals on my left pinky finger.

    • writer20 profile image

      Joyce Haragsim 

      7 years ago from Southern Nevada

      A little more info. In Germany,German women wear their wedding rings on their right hands.

      My ring is on my left hand I wouldn't have it any other way.

    • kirstenblog profile image

      kirstenblog 

      7 years ago from London UK

      I know! I really love the idea. I like the idea that with a first born it is wise to re-affirm the relationship and have a renewal of love. Life is full of mile stones and it is wonderful to be able to commemorate them in special ways.

    • Deerwhisperer profile imageAUTHOR

      Brenda K Krupnow 

      7 years ago from Ravenden, AR

      Um, a ring commemorating the first born. Wow, that's awesome!

    • kirstenblog profile image

      kirstenblog 

      7 years ago from London UK

      I actually have read about some of this when talking about rings with my husband (we exchanged cheep rings that have since broke but are financially much better of then we were when we were married and were looking at wedding rings). Did you know that the ring companies are trying to create a tradition of giving another ring when the first child is born? Like a re-affirming the marriage now that a child is born. I love pretty rings so am all for it! LOL

    • profile image

      Deerwhisperer 

      7 years ago

      dahoglund

      Yes, I know what you mean. When I worked at the drycleaners, I often had to leave all my jewelry at home for fear it would get caught in the presses and would leave my fingers badly mangled or burnt.

    • dahoglund profile image

      Don A. Hoglund 

      7 years ago from Wisconsin Rapids

      An interesting subject. Many men who work around machinery do not like to wear ring and that may become the case with some women as more women are doing such jobs now. The reason is that rings can get caught and a finger lost.

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