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Travels With Maggie: The Forest Primeval

Updated on July 3, 2019

Maggie Is Recovered

Back at full-strength, my girl is, no complications from the spaying, and ready to romp on our daily walks once again.

Won’t you join us? As June transitions into July, the Pacific Northwest is basking in morning clouds (we call it a marine layer) and afternoon sunshine, highs in the seventies daily, mild and lovely. You won’t need a light jacket on our walk. This is good walking weather for sure, so let’s get started. And Tobias won’t be joining us today. He still hasn’t learned his manners when around chickens, so I left him home with a bone.

A Fallen Soldier

There is construction happening along the country path. One home is framed and awaiting electricians and plumbers. Another has just cleared away the scrub grass in preparation for the pouring of a foundation. One casualty of all this “progress” was the cutting down of a majestic maple tree, probably one-hundred feet in height, I’m guessing a century in age if a day.

A century . . . that tree was here just after the end of World War I. It stood through the Great Depression, World War 2, the Korean War, and Vietnam. The Oil Embargo did not faze it, nor the Iran Contra Affair, and it breezed through all of man’s attempts to poison it with pesticides and rapidly deteriorating air.

Only to be cut down so a home can be erected.

It saddens me. Maggie doesn’t know what to make of it. We’ve passed that tree for two years now, a daily sentinel along our walk, and my girl looked confused as we walked by the mammoth corpse.

The mood of that walk changed. The air seemed to hold a bit more bite. Leaves rustled with a wind non-existent two minutes earlier and then, just as suddenly, all was quiet, nature holding her breath. In anticipation? In warning? In mourning?

A Copse of Trees

Shortly after we came to a copse of trees; I’ve always loved that word, copse, and often wondered about its origin. A copse, a thicket, a coppice, all meaning the same thing, a grove if you will, it’s all in the eye of the beholder, I would say. To someone from Oklahoma, it would be a forest. To someone from the Yukon, it might seem like landscaping. To me and Maggie girl, on that day, it was foreboding.

In midstride Maggie stopped, looked into that dark curtain of undergrowth, limbs, and shadows, and growled. The hair rose on her back, the growl grew in intensity, and I was suddenly transported back to childhood and the irrational fear each shadow held for me. There is something primal about a forest so thick that vision is limited in range to single feet. It is the unknown which has always sparked flames of insecurity and trepidation. It is nights in bed as a child, branches scraping against glass during a windstorm; it is entering a dark room after watching a horror movie; it is irrational and it is real, exhilarating and terrifying, a universal truth in a world of ambiguity.

I could see nothing and yet I was certain something was there. Many a coyote inhabits these lands, as well as an occasional black bear and even a cougar from time to time. It is not unusual for pets to go missing, for livestock to disappear during the night, and even for the occasional jogger to be attacked, so Maggie’s growl definitely had me on full alert.

The cracking of undergrowth could be heard, clearly at first and then faintly, and then Maggie stopped growling, looked at me, and wagged her tail. The danger had moved on and Maggie was telling me we could resume our walk. I relaxed my sphincters, took one more glance into the gloom, patted my girl on the head, and marched on, once again humbled by nature, once again well-aware of my stature in the natural hierarchy.

The Return

We reached the end of the road, turned around, and retraced our steps homeward bound, the copse now on our right as we approached. A shift of clouds, the required advancement of the sun, and that section of “forest” was illuminated and no longer the precursor of danger. Maggie glanced once at it, sniffed the air, and then moved on, carefree in every way, and isn’t that just the way life is, problems to be faced, challenges towering above us, threatening to smother us, and then a shift in the clouds, a little sunshine, and the dark moment is gone. How many times, in my lifetime, has that been true, the darkest days suddenly bathed in sunlight, and all is once again well in the world?

Those lessons are learned over time. They are learned in the heat of battle, in the muck and mire of problems, some real, some imagined. They mold us, they strengthen us, and they prepare us for even larger challenges. We finally reach a point in life where we can sniff the air and distinguish real threats from imagined, and in that moment we gain a modicum of wisdom upon which we can build.

The Walk Ends

Maggie wags her tail. The end of the walk means “treat time” for her, and a treat she does deserve. I’ve learned to trust my girl on these walks. She has instincts I simply do not have. And I suspect, in her dog way, she has learned to trust in me, and that fills me with joy.

Maggie is my connection with the past, the 1950’s in Technicolor, a way to revisit some very good memories of a boy and his dog, back when there was no expiration date on youth, and every damned thing you dreamt was possible. It was a time of innocence, and a touch of innocence in 2019 is just what this sojourner needs to brighten his day. It seems, to me, that innocence is in short supply these days, and I find that sad. We have grown up much too quickly. Our psyches and emotions struggle to catch up with the tidal wave of information, good and bad, flooding over us daily. It’s probably much the same for a new puppy, like Maggie’s brother Tobias, every single day an onslaught upon the senses, a bombardment of the new, and I’m sure it is unsettling for him at times, just as watching the news is unsettling for me.

So these walks are necessary for my sanity, and necessary for my balance. They ground me in the “what’s important” foundation of life. On these walks, Maggie and I boil life down to its basic component, that being love. Some would say I’m too simplistic in my viewpoints. I would say to them that I wake each morning happy, and go to bed at night the same, so how wrong can I be with my simplicity?

I look at Maggie, her tail wagging, and I know she is happy. She doesn’t give a tinker’s damn about possessions or money. She has no concept of greed, and she has no desire to climb the ladder of success. She is with her owner, she knows she is loved, and her life is fulfilled.

Yep, I probably am too simplistic!

Thanks for joining us. If you are ever in Olympia, I invite you to join us. We would love to walk side-by-side with you, and discuss matters of importance.

Matters like love!

TTFN

Bill!

2019 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      7 weeks ago from Olympia, WA

      Lawrence, carrying that old lab was quite a feat on your part. I would go on shorter walks for sure. lol Yes, exactly, getting lost in the woods...losing oneself...sounds heavenly, doesn't it?

    • lawrence01 profile image

      Lawrence Hebb 

      7 weeks ago from Hamilton, New Zealand

      Bill

      So glad I could join you on this walk.

      Every time we venture out I get a reminder of the times as a teenager when I'd take my dogs for a walk, and we'd walk so far I'd have to carry the older one home (she was about fifteen at the time, and we'd cover about that in miles, so she was pretty fit for an old dog! and by the way, she was a Labrador Alsation cross, so not a small dog!)

      They're great memories to have, and I love the journey they take me on, thank you.

      Sorry to hear about the old Maple, pity we can't find another way to build around them, we have some trees here that I reckon are about six or seven hundred years old and it would be a disaster to see them go (one tree I know of just down the road has a circumference of about twenty feet, and has a protection order on it).

      As a Teenager, I used to love walking through the Forest and never understood the 'primal fear' people felt as to me, it felt like a place to lose yourself, I could hide from the world there.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks so much, Sha! I'm told that tree was dying and had to be cut before it just fell over. I'll have to take their word for that. I guess it's possible. It sure was a beauty1

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      3 months ago from Central Florida

      Bill, if only the rest of the world would embrace simplicity the way you do, we'd have peace and serenity.

      Why didn't the developer mark that majestic tree to be saved? Here in Florida, where (too much) building is a daily occurrence, before the wooded areas are razed, (now that's an oxymoron if I ever heard one!), strategic trees are marked with an orange X, which means leave them alone.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      3 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Hugs to you, PS, and it's always a pleasure having you visit. You, old? If you are old then I am a museum piece. lol But I do love me a solitary walk; they help keep me sane, my friend.

      Angels weighted down with hugs and blessings headed your way.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 

      3 months ago from sunny Florida

      Gotta' love Country Road and the myriad of country roads of youth. Hearing of your walk and your observations with Maggie I reflect once again on the youth I spent that was indeed in a kinder gentler time. I am now in this techie world but part of me longs for the simplicity of yesteryear. I guess that makes me seem O L D!! My walks are of a singular nature now but regardless the peace and joy that walking brings calms my soul and much too busy mind. Always am glad when I am able to visit you, Bill. Hugs and blessings and many Angels are headed your way ps

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Verlie! I know we can't stop progress, but I sure wish we could slow it up a bit, don't you? :)

    • snakeslane profile image

      Verlie Burroughs 

      4 months ago from Canada

      Bill, I can so relate to this write, the feelings we get while walking through forest are indeed primal, and healing too, as you describe so well. And the life span of a tree, compared to the relatively short life of us humans (and our beloved pets!) is really something to ponder. I get disturbed by needless destruction of natural habitat too. Especially when it is a tree that has become a familiar landmark, then suddenly it's gone. Good to see Maggie is up and about with you on your walks.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Mr. Happy, thank you always for the wonderful comments.

      I spent a summer working at The Filmore in San Francisco...backstage work....saw Joplin live from about twenty feet away...what a piece of work that woman was. The energy crackled off of her.

      Eyes in the darkness give me the creeps. It happens in our backyard, raccoons out for a late snack. I don't like it.

      Growing up? You are right, of course. We are still toddlers messing our own pants.

      Have a brilliant weekend!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I love it, Jo! And a kingdom it is, and it is worth protecting, and good for you for doing it.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Zulma, I feel your pain. A whole city block was bulldozed under recently. I go by that block daily; it had sat vacant for years, a mini forest in the middle of that city...and last week some bastard cut them all down in one day. The mini paradise disappeared in a matter of eight hours.

      Sad!

      I'm not sure how far out into the wilderness one would have to go to get away from "advancement and development," but I feel your pain for sure.

    • Mr. Happy profile image

      Mr. Happy 

      4 months ago from Toronto, Canada

      "A century . . . that tree was here just after the end of World War I." - See, I think since our lives are so short, we lack foresight. If we could live hundreds of years, we would understand more about life but on the other hand, thank God we do not live hundreds of years. We multiply way too much/too fast for this planet to sustain us hundreds of years, as individuals. We're like bloody rabbits.

      "A Copse of Trees" - Well, thanks for teaching this immigrant English. I first thought: did he misspell "corpse"? You were talking about a dead tree just before but ya, You do not misspell things so, I looked it up and learned a new word - cheers!

      "There is something primal about a forest so thick that vision is limited in range to single feet." - What I find creepy is when You look at the forest at night and You see just one pair of eyes looking back. Then, You walk away and the pair of eyes is walking with You. It only happened to me once but ya, that was pretty cold. I growled. I do give-off signs before I bite, usually lol And I do not like being followed, especially when I do not know who is following me.

      "isn’t that just the way life is, problems to be faced, challenges towering above us, threatening to smother us, and then a shift in the clouds, a little sunshine, and the dark moment is gone." - It's a bloody roller-coaster and to be perfectly plain: I am not a fan of roller-coasters.

      "We have grown up much too quickly" - I actually think we did not grow up enough. Some of us still deny climate change, some of us are still way too quick to draw the guns out, some of us are still way too ignorant and selfish and on and on. No, we still have much growing to do. Sigh ...

      Love listening to the songs You post. They take me back to a time I never knew but a time I have read about and seen movies/documentaries about. A huge part of me wishes I was born in the mid 50s just so I can be in my teens, or 20s in the 60s-70s. Then, I might have had a chance to see Janis Joplin. Why am I in love with dead people and with nobody alive? LOL

      Alrighty, You have yourself a good one. Thank You for your writing. I appreciate it. All the very best!

    • jo miller profile image

      Jo Miller 

      4 months ago from Tennessee

      I'm glad you and Maggie are minding the trees out there in Washington. I'm very protective of my trees here in Tennessee. Most people when building a new home do cut down too many trees. I followed the dozer around when we were beginning construction to be sure he didn't cut down more than necessary. Now one of my favorite activities here is to go out each day and 'survey all my kingdom'.

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 

      4 months ago from United Kingdom

      Glad to hear Maggie's all better know. Poor Toby, though. Did he seem sad that he wouldn't be going walkies with you?

      It's so sad such a majestic tree was taken down. When I first lived in this village, it had a distinctive smell. Two, actually. One was the odour of freshly fertilized fields, the other the smell of the old brick factories working overtime. That's gone now. Once the clay gave out, the land stood dormant until someone decided it would be ideal for a new town development. The first thing that went up was the mall and all its attendant shops. This was a fine thing at first as we didn't have to drive 15 minutes to the nearest city and spend time looking for parking. The drive to the new development was on a two-lane road through a woods. The trees would arch over the road giving it an air of mystery and intrigue.

      That's all changed now. The town is spreading like a cancer, invading any open area. To be fair, some of these places were eyesores and have benefitted from development. But no longer do we enjoy a country drive under a forest canopy. The road is now four-lanes wide with barely a tree in sight. A few days ago I saw where still another housing development is being built. (heavy sigh) My little paradise is gone and I find myself with an overwhelming desire to sell up everything and run in search of a new Eden. But how long before the bulldozers come, I wonder. This is why I enjoy coming along on your walks. At least your home is still pristine.

      On a good note, I got to see Stonehenge on our way home from holiday. We had to take a detour that took us right past the sight. It was pretty cool.

      Enjoy your day.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      It's always a pleasure, William. Thank you for joining us once again.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Genna! That tree is still laying on the ground. I wish they would haul it away so I don't have to look at it daily.

    • lifegate profile image

      William Kovacic 

      4 months ago from Pleasant Gap, PA

      It was a wonderful and meaningful walk, Bill and Maggie. Thank you for allowing me to accompany you both. I enjoyed it much!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Ann, I suppose I am a bit aloof. It just adds to my mystery. lol

      bill

    • Genna East profile image

      Genna East 

      4 months ago from Massachusetts, USA

      Hi Bill...

      (I like the word, copse...I so seldom see it used in a sentence, but it's a perfect placement in your story.)

      It's good to know that Maggie has recovered. :-)

      Her growling had me a bit worried. That's not usual for her. Thank goodness the fear of the unknown was only temporary and whatever it was moved on. I only wish the construction crew could have moved on as well before cutting down that majestic maple.

      As always, Bill, your walks with Maggie are a delight. Thank you.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      4 months ago from SW England

      Funny that! I've been called aloof but that's because I'm shy amongst a crowd of people I don't know. Those who know me well don't believe that!

      Ann

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      You and me both, Ann! People have told me I"m complicated. I'm really just a simple man with simple needs. Nothing terribly complicated about me....maybe it's aloof appearance that makes me appear complicated. :)

      Happy Weekend to you, Ann!

      bill

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I'm afraid, Nithya, all those buildings would make me a crazy man.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I wish you were too, Sean! Thank you my friend.

      bill

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      MizB, thank you, and I'm with you about that tree. It would have made a great shade-giver as the new family settled in...great sentinel for their new home. Sigh!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh fine, Sis, we'll stop along the way and have a picnic. You are sooooo demanding sometimes! Honestly, it's been this way since we were five, Sis, and Mom always let you get away with it. Grrrrrrrr!

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      4 months ago from SW England

      Glad to hear Maggie's recovered and out on the walks again.

      It makes me really sad to see an established tree cut down needlessly. It happened when we sold our place in France; a lovely 50 year old lime tree under which we used to have most of our meals with our friends. I cried when I saw what the new occupiers had done. You can't replace something like that. So glad I have photos.

      I totally agree with the sentiments of this piece. A good walk, being part of the natural environment and going back to simple times, simple enjoyments.

      But then my simple mind is at home there!

      Have a fabulous Friday, bill!

      Ann

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 

      4 months ago from Dubai

      Happy that Maggie recovered and am happy Maggie is there to warn you of danger ahead. A walk helps me to clear my head and relax. It must be great to be surrounded by nature, here it is only buildings and more buildings.

    • Sean Dragon profile image

      Ioannis Arvanitis 

      4 months ago from Greece, Almyros

      Any dark moment brightens so many following moments! Everything is a gift! I am grateful that I can read your "simplistic" writings!

      I wish I was nearby Olympia!

      Sean

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks Karen! They are about 18 months different in age...Tobias still has some puppy in him to run off. I'll be an old man before that happens lol oh wait, I am an old man!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you RoadMonkey! We appreciate you.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Audrey, and Happy 4th to you. Mild weather and good times,my friend.

      love,

      bill

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks so much, Linda! I would have built around that tree, but that's just me.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Linda! Maybe some day you'll join us. As strong as that bond is,the bond between Maggie and Bev is stronger still.

      Happy 4th my friend.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Flourish! I think so too.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      We love having you walk with us, Devika. Thank you!

    • Seafarer Mama profile image

      Karen A Szklany 

      4 months ago from New England

      Very lovely reflection, Bill! Glad I could catch one of your walk pieces again. Glad Maggie and Tobias are doing well. How far apart in age are they? I guess the chicken manners training will take a little while.

      Yes, love and contentment go hand-in-hand. ~:0)

    • RoadMonkey profile image

      RoadMonkey 

      4 months ago

      Give me that simplicity every day. Nothing to beat it. Great ramble as ever. Glad Maggie is fully recovered.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 

      4 months ago from Idyllwild Ca.

      I actually get sick to my stomach when I come across a tree that has given its life for a new house, building or shopping center. Anger is not part of my make up, but it raises its ugly head when these beauties are destroyed for any reason.

      Glad to hear that sweet Maggie is on the mend. Tobias will eventually learn good chicken manners.

      Enjoy the lovely weather, my friend.

      love,

      audrey

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      4 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      It's sad when a tree that has lived through so much history is destroyed. I wish the house that you describe had been built somewhere else. I hope you have an enjoyable July 4th, Bill.

    • MizBejabbers profile image

      Doris James MizBejabbers 

      4 months ago from Beautiful South

      So glad that Maggie’s feeling better and ready for that walk. Growling at the copse, huh, probably just a groundhog or fox, but it pays to be cautious. It is a cryin’ shame about that tree. It should have been left to live another 100 years or more. I’m afraid the house would have to have been relocated if it were my property. Your description of the copse sounds like my backyard and the vacant overgrown jungle to the west of us. I haven’t been down to the edge of my “backyard” since I broke my leg in 2006. I admire the way you can take a jungle like that and give us a life lesson. Give Maggie a hug for me, and next time take Tobias along, too. He needs a lesson, I’m sure, and Maggie is probably the best one to teach him.

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 

      4 months ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Bro....For some reason, I have a feeling that Tobias was pleased as can be to be left home with a bone. Doesn't take much to make him smile & wag that tail, I'll bet. Soooooo just when & how do you expect to teach him his chicken manners? One look at that devilish face of his and I will only wish you Good Luck! LOL

      But on to our walk...It's great Maggie bounced back so quickly after her surgery. Heck, Bro, after I was spayed, I milked it for all it was worth!! On the couch for several days, being catered to and waited on. Hey, why not?

      I could sense that you and Maggie had some deep, sullen thoughts as you walked along, so I did my best at not gabbing as much as usual. Hope you noticed ....wasn't that sweet of your sister?

      These walks are becoming the best part of my week. Next week though...we need to pack a lunch and find a place to rest and eat! OK? If not, I volunteer to stay home with Tobias if I can have a bone too! Love ya, Sis

    • Carb Diva profile image

      Linda Lum 

      4 months ago from Washington State, USA

      Bill, with so much drama and conflict in the world, your walks with Maggie are a big breath of fresh air. I think my blood pressure goes down a few points as I read your descriptions. The only thing better would to actually be there with the two of you. The bond that the two of you have is truly beautiful.

    • FlourishAnyway profile image

      FlourishAnyway 

      4 months ago from USA

      I'm jealous of highs in the 70s when here it's in the mid-90s and I feel like I am melting. Your description of that tree makes me wonder what was destroyed so that my house could be built. You have a great dog there, Bill.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 

      4 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      It is fun going for walks new experiences and stories are often told of these outdoor adventures.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      That's what it's all about, Mary, happiness among loved ones. Thank you for sharing that.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      I've read about that too, Liz, and it greatly depresses me. Thank you for your kind words.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      It does indeed, Mary! Thank you for joining us. I hope you are well.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Pamela, I'm old-fashioned and proud of it! :) Happy 4th of July to you!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Then my work is done, Pop! Happy 4th to you!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      You are always welcome, Sally! I'll save a spot for you in the queue!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Happy 4th, Heidi. It saddens me every single time I see a great tree cut down. I just wish the advancement of our species didn't mean the decline of another.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 

      4 months ago from Ontario, Canada

      I'm glad you're being simplistic Bill in this most important point. I was in the cottage for Canada Day, with family, and it is always a great feeling when you are among loved ones. I go to sleep happy and wake up happy.

    • Eurofile profile image

      Liz Westwood 

      4 months ago from UK

      Your writing is so descriptive, I feel like the reader joins you in the experience. It's sad to see old trees uprooted. I was reading only recently on a much larger scale how quickly the Amazon rain forest is being uprooted.

    • Blond Logic profile image

      Mary Wickison 

      4 months ago from Brazil

      Thanks for taking us on your walk. Here on our farm, we had to take down several trees, and I hated doing that.

      It's great that Maggie is alert to potential danger, and has got your back.

      A walk in nature always puts things into perspective.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      4 months ago from Sunny Florida

      I love hearing about your walks with Maggie in the perfect weather as we complain daily about temperatures 95-97. I am sorry to hear about the old tree. They seem to build houses, one on top the other, everywhere you look anymore. I suppose some see progress, but I liked it better about 35 years ago in Jacksonville. I guess I am old fashioned in some respects. I am there in spirit as well.

    • breakfastpop profile image

      breakfastpop 

      4 months ago

      I may not be there in person, but I am in spirit. When "we" come home, I feel refreshed and content.

    • sallybea profile image

      Sally Gulbrandsen 

      4 months ago from Norfolk

      I love these walks with Maggie. I can't think of a nicer thing to do than join both of you one of your walks should I ever be in your neck of the woods. I suspect that I will have to join a long queue.

    • heidithorne profile image

      Heidi Thorne 

      4 months ago from Chicago Area

      More beautiful-ness from your travels!

      When I see long-lived trees being taken down, I feel the same way. I, too, realize that they were here maybe even centuries. Our village was established around the Civil War and I'm sure some of these sentinels were already here at the time. Their trunks are absolutely massive. The stories they could tell! Luckily, many are still standing and haven't fallen victim to diseases that wiped out a bunch of them, or to construction.

      Thank you for sharing your journey with us! Happy July 4th!

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, I can't fall into a trap I can't spell. lol Thanks my friend...Happy 4th to you and yours.

    • billybuc profile imageAUTHOR

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you Marlene. I'm glad you could join us. Happy 4th to you as well. Stay safe!

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 

      4 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Wonderfully wise today Bill. That tree deal bums me out. Thanks alot I will be thinking of it all day.

      I like how you talk of Maggie and do not fall into the trap of anthropomorphism.

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 

      4 months ago from USA

      This was a nice walk. From a short moment of fear to pure joy,

      there were plenty of emotions on this walk.

      Have a fun 4th of July!

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