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Kateri Tekakwitha's canonization.

  1. profile image0
    Rad Manposted 5 years ago

    All they were waiting for is a miracle and they believe they got it when  Jake Finkbonner, a boy from Washington State was infected by a flesh-eating bacterium in his face. His face was opened and much of his face was removed and he of course was given meds to fight the infection, but the infection seemed to be winning. A local church prayed to Kateri and eventually the boy recovered. The Vatican deemed this a miracle, the doctor said that the medication may have started working.

    Thoughts?

    1. profile image0
      Motown2Chitownposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Interesting.  If there is a discrepancy, the Church has the responsibility to wait until it has been resolved before canonization.

      1. profile image0
        Rad Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        It's my understanding the vatican doesn't see any discrepancy.

        1. profile image0
          Motown2Chitownposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          Hmmm.  I'm going to have to check into this myself.  smile  Be back.

  2. profile image0
    Motown2Chitownposted 5 years ago

    http://www.mercurynews.com/california/c … merican-be

    Here's an interesting article.  My take on it is that doctors had declared the boy already incurable and were not treating him any longer?  Did I miss something?

    1. profile image0
      Rad Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      "You could always look at this and say that the surgery cured him or the intensive care doctors cured him or the medicines finally kicked in," Dr. Hopper said. "But it was really an incredible day when he did turn the corner because it wasn't something we took for granted at any time."

    2. A Troubled Man profile image61
      A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      From the link...

      "But for her to become a saint, another miracle attributed to her intercession was needed. In 2006, a young boy from Washington state contracted a flesh-eating bacteria that spread over his face. Doctors said the disease was incurable. His family, devout Catholics, prayed to Blessed Kateri. The boy's condition improved, so much so that he was released from the hospital, according to various reports."

      It appears the boy stayed at the hospital until after his condition improved even though the doctors said the disease was incurable. They already knew that but were treating him anyways. The question is at what point did they stop treating him while he was in the hospital before his condition improved, if that was indeed the case?

      1. profile image0
        Rad Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

        From the article I read at www.cbc.ca they have not stopped treatment. He was of course on heavy medication to fight the infections.

        "You could always look at this and say that the surgery cured him or the intensive care doctors cured him or the medicines finally kicked in," Dr. Hopper said. "But it was really an incredible day when he did turn the corner because it wasn't something we took for granted at any time."

        "I certainly believe in miracles," Dr. Hopper says, adding though that "it's a different meaning for everyone. I'm just really happy when things work out well."

        Father Sauer was more convinced. He assembled evidence and testimony from the doctors and sent it to Rome.


        It's interesting that one article says it was incurable and the other says it could have gone either way. One of the two is clearly lying.

        1. A Troubled Man profile image61
          A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

          From this link, it doesn't say much about being incurable, but at the end of the article is a list of notable people who have contracted it, and they all appear to have survived.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Necrotizing_fasciitis

          1. profile image0
            Rad Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Are you saying someone is lying for Jesus?

            1. profile image0
              jomineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              When they do it for Jesus,they do not call it lying. Besides they are too eager to confirm Jesus, they forget to check facts.
              A single person surviving a crash is a miracle for Jesus while they conveniently forget the hundreds that died.

            2. A Troubled Man profile image61
              A Troubled Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              Does the Pope make the world safe for pedophiles?

            3. grand old lady profile image87
              grand old ladyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

              Sadly, people lie for Jesus and they honestly believe they are making things better that way. Basically, people lie for everybody anyway. People just lie, some more than others, some pathologically.

          2. profile image0
            jomineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

            Necrotizing fasciitis is not rare. Though very difficult to control, it usually does not kill people unless the persons receive medical care very late into the disease or he is immunocompromised or has other serious co- morbidities. Though I have not seen it affecting face, I've seen so many limb cases. Irrespective of the prognosis, the patient is given higher antibiotics and thorough debridement Is done to remove dead tissues and bacteria on the Dead tissues.

  3. grand old lady profile image87
    grand old ladyposted 5 years ago

    They are also making some Filipino saints, too. I think the Vatican wants to have more minorities among their saints. I have doubts however about how they prove these people to be saints and miracles and stuff because of the way they are trying to rush the sainthood of Pope John Paul II. True, he was a great pope, but too many corners were crossed in pushing his sainthood.

    I believe in miracles, and I believe that saints are just ordinary people who have a personal relationship with Jesus. But as a former Catholic I loved reading about saints and in that sense, will still like them but see them more for who they are than as special because of miracles. Life itself is already a miracle.

  4. A Troubled Man profile image61
    A Troubled Manposted 5 years ago

    Again, from the link...

    "The Kateri Circle was formed 30 years ago to spread the word about the saint-to-be as well as to reach out to Native Americans who have lost faith in the Catholic Church.

    Some also said her sainthood could heal old wounds between Native Americans and the Catholic Church.

    "This will hopefully bring more awareness of the indigenous people," said Sylvia Mendivil Salazar, coordinator for Native American Concerns for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles Ministry.

    Mendivil Salazar, who is of the Akimel O'odham/Yaqui tribe, said she is glad the church is continuing to honor native people.

    "The native people have waited for many years for her canonization," she said. "Her canonization is very much what's needed in the world right now, which is to take care of Mother Earth."


    For some reason, red flags are going up and I get the impression the Catholic Church is merely paying lip service for the atrocities committed on the Native Americans in the name of Catholicism and the Kateri Circle is the political affront for that.

  5. getitrite profile image80
    getitriteposted 5 years ago

    It's amazing how the Spaniards tortured the Native people of the Americas into accepting Christianity, with all types of atrocities, including chopping off limbs, decapitations, vicious dog attacks, burning people alive, disemboweling, smashing infants brains out, and boiling people alive. 

    Why would Native Americans want anything to do with this diabolical bull----, that laid waste to their people?

    1. profile image0
      Rad Manposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You've reminded me of the Canadian Indian residential school system. Residential boarding schools for aboriginal people of Canada where until 1996 children were taken from there parents and put in residential schools and this was administered by Christian churches.
      Removing the children from their families, depriving them of their ancestral languages, and exposing many of them to physical and sexual abuse at the hands of their teachers and other students was the order of the day.

 
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