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Laser Hair Restoration- Can Laser Hair Restoration be a Viable Treatment To Regrow Hair?

Updated on August 8, 2012

Laser Hair Restoration- The Real Deal or Snake Oil Scheme?

While the discovery of laser hair restoration can be dated back to 1950s, it wasn’t until 1964 when a Hungarian researcher, Andre Mester discovered that low-energy laser light stimulated accelerated growth and thickening of the hair. Today, laser hair regrowth is being touted as the next “magical” wand that can miraculously restore a full head of hair.
Not so fast.
Although laser light may possibly be beneficial for hair regrowth, there is no definitive evidence that it does so, and its effectiveness receives mixed reviews. Continue reading to discover whether laser hair loss treatments are the next best thing—or the next best dud.

What You Will Find In This Hub...


http://www.flickr.com/photos/funnybusiness/ / CC BY-SA 2.0
http://www.flickr.com/photos/funnybusiness/ / CC BY-SA 2.0

The Three Types of Laser Hair Loss Treatments

  • Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)

Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a general term that describes any sort of phototherapy or laser treatment that does not break the skin. It is based on the theory that any type of light can have an effect on cell function. LLLT can also be referred as low-power laser, soft laser, or therapeutic laser therapy. Because it doesn’t break the skin, it is virtually painless and noninvasive. LLLT administered to the scalp has been shown to improve the health of existing hair and stimulate new hair growth.

Proponents of low-level laser therapy claim that it works increasing the blood supply in the scalp, thus stimulating cell activity and improving hair growth by giving the hair follicles more access to nutrients. Due to its skin repairing properties, LLLT can be used to aid healing of the scalp after hair transplant surgery.

  • Laser Luce LDS 100®

The Laser Luce LDS 100® is laser hair loss treatment system that has been shown to stimulate growth in 70 percent of hairs in their resting phase. This system is similar to low-level laser therapy in which it increased blood flow to the scalp, allowing hair follicles to absorb more nutrients and resulting is thicker, healthier hair.

This laser treatment device looks like a hard hood dryer which is placed over the head. It discharges flashing low energy lights which is absorbed through the skin.
Therapy with this is commonly combined with other effective hair loss remedies, such as minoxidil and finasteride. Patients tend to undergo a series of treatments to achieve desired results.

  • Home Laser Hair Therapy Device – Laser Comb

This is a hand-held device that administers phototherapy to the scalp when brushed through the hair. Hair loss specialists sometimes recommend the laser comb to enhance in office laser therapy. Some physicians may also suggest using a laser comb to accelerate healing after hair transplant surgery.


Laser Hair Treatment Gets FDA Clearance

Laser Hair Regrowth Therapy- FDA Approved?

If you’ve been researching laser hair regrowth systems online, you may have seen websites claiming that laser hair growth therapy is FDA approved. Well, this is a little misleading. There is no hair growth laser that is “FDA approved”, but the Hairmax laser comb has FDA clearance. This means that the product has been found to be harmless, and may be marketed as a hair loss device, but it does not prove its effectiveness in treating baldness.

Candidates for Laser Hair Replacement

The best candidates for this type of treatment are those who are in the early stages of hair thinning and hair loss. Specifically, laser hair loss treatments are ideal for:

• Men or women who have hereditary male or female pattern hair loss

• Men or women currently using prescription or over the counter hair loss medications/supplements

• Those plan to have surgical hair restoration

• Those with illnesses that have caused hair loss

• Women who are experiencing post-partum hair loss


Does Laser Hair Regrowth Work?

Laser Hair Growth Effectiveness Debate

A study presented at International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) meeting in 2007 confirmed increase in hair shaft diameter, fullness, and overall quality with laser hair treatment alone. Additionally, some statistically significant evidence reveals that low level laser therapy when combined with 5% minoxidil provided noticeable cosmetic benefits for women in particular. However, this study also showed that laser hair loss treatment alone produced no statistically significant new hair growth in both men and women.

While some physicians swear by laser therapy’s ability to improve hair loss conditions, other’s reject the claims entirely. Some doctors believe that it is only effective used in conjunction with minoxidil and/or finasteride. Others believe that it may only be beneficial for those with minimal thinning hair.

Since laser hair loss treatment is free of side effects, trying a procedure or device is harmless. Treatments can add up to be pricey, so it is important to maintain realistic expectations, and do research before participating in laser therapy.

Ultimately, there is no evidence showing that laser hair restoration therapy conclusively works or does not work, so further research is needed.

Laser Hair Restoration - What Do You Think?

Do You Believe That Laser Hair Growth Treatments and Devices Work?

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Laser Hair Treatment Before and After

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    • profile image

      not convinced...yet 

      7 years ago

      hey was it just me or did anybody else notice that in all the before and after shots, the parts in the subjects hair had all mysteriously migrated an inch or two to the left or right and in one case completely to the other side of her head? It's a bit like taking a picture of area A to support an assertion that deforestation is not happening in area B.

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