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jump to last post 1-7 of 7 discussions (14 posts)

Can you suggest an economical digital camera I can buy to take good photos of my

  1. mary615 profile image93
    mary615posted 6 years ago

    Can you suggest an economical digital camera I can buy to take good photos of my flowers?

    I have an Olympus, 14megapixal that is small and easy to use, but my closeups are always blurred.

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/6511422_f260.jpg

  2. Susan Ng profile image92
    Susan Ngposted 6 years ago

    Hmm... I think any camera would be able to take good photos of flowers if you set it right. smile Did you enable "macro" for this shot? I usually go macro for closeups. smile

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      This little camera has so many settings, I have not full utilized them.  I'll try and do that.  thanks.

  3. tapasrecipe profile image60
    tapasrecipeposted 6 years ago

    Panasonic lumix tz range i think they go from tz 14 to tz 30 they get superb results and reviews and have a macro thingy, and fantastic zoom. depends how professional you can afford to be or want to be. these retail under 200 pounds,in Amazon.
    Also it is good to use a tripod and a cable when taking close-ups, less shake. ;-) Carrie

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I don't have a tripod, I just try and hold the camera steady. I might invest in one. Thanks.

  4. Teylina profile image60
    Teylinaposted 6 years ago

    Unfortunately I'm on the less-affordable budget, but had been looking for a decent one w/zoom. Never thought or understood about macro--will look into it. I always check pawn shops when I start looking for stuff like this (reliable ones)

    1. nifwlseirff profile image98
      nifwlseirffposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Ebay is also a good place to check, once you have decided on the model you want. But you do need to read the seller's description, feedback and terms!

  5. Stephanie Henkel profile image95
    Stephanie Henkelposted 6 years ago

    I think a 14mp Olympus would be able to take excellent close-ups. There are a few  things you can try with your current camera, but the most important is to read the instruction manual and learn how to use the various settings on your camera for peak performance.

    1) Read your instruction book and learn how to set the camera for close-ups. I'm sure there's a setting. Then you need to learn how close you can get to take clear photos. 2) using a regular auto focus setting, read your book to find out how close you can be to your subject and still get a clear picture. If it's 3 feet, then getting closer will give you a blurry picture. Snap the picture, then crop and enlarge on your computer if you need to do so.
    3) When using the zoom, don't go into the digital zoom setting. That will give you a grainy picture.
    4) Use a tripod to eliminate camera shake.

    Good luck!

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks.  Your photos are always sharp and nice.  Will take your advice.

  6. Rosie2010 profile image74
    Rosie2010posted 6 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6521831_f260.jpg

    Hi Mary, I have a Nikon 10megapizels and my flower closeups look good, not the best but focused. 

    Your camera is much better than mine, so should be able to get better closeups.  Like Susan Ng, I also set my camera to macro for closeups.  Mine is easy... my camera actually says "closeups."  smile

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Your photo here of the Daffodil is wonderful. Thanks.

  7. nifwlseirff profile image98
    nifwlseirffposted 6 years ago

    https://usercontent2.hubstatic.com/6119939_f260.jpg

    Most cameras, especially more recent models, can take good photos of flowers, especially if they have a macro or close-up setting.

    Your photo is beautifully focused on the leaves behind the flower! This probably occurred due to the flash, but also possibly due to camera shake (moving the focus).

    I try to avoid anything with a flash, because that washes out the colours, and often results in the camera focusing where I don't want it to!

    My 6 year old Canon Powershot 3IS (6 megapixel) is a fantastic workhorse, but it has the most terrible flash - I can't photograph anything at night. Inside, I try to point a lamp at whatever I'm trying to photograph, so there is enough light.  But it does capture great close-up photos during the day (the attached photos was taken on a cloudy day at a beach in Western Australia).

    As Stephanie and Tapas mentioned, a tripod is very useful for keeping a camera steady, keeping the focus on your flowers. 
    Personally, I need image stabilisation in the camera (I shake a lot when holding a camera), and found with this, I didn't need a tripod (most of the time).

    If I take photos from further away (not using the macro setting), I crop in a photo editor.

    When looking for a new camera for flower photography, choose one with good macro and super-macro settings. 
    A good lens (a good brand of camera) is more important than an extremely high megapixel count.
    And if you don't want to use a tripod, pick one with good image stabilisation (for photographing the more tricky-to-reach flowers).

    1. mary615 profile image93
      mary615posted 6 years agoin reply to this

      If I do many more of these Hubs about flowers, I will definitely buy a tripod, cause I know I cannot hold the camera really still. Thanks.

    2. nifwlseirff profile image98
      nifwlseirffposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      A flexible small tripod line, which can take up to mid-sized cameras, are the Gorillapods by Joby - they can wrap around poles and bannisters, and are more flexible than a standard even-legged tripod.  The one with the ball-head joint is even better!

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