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Burnout: Leave Blogging for a Day and Trail Hike for Adventure

Updated on April 26, 2012

Go for a day adventure!

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Get up and lace up your hiking boots! Who knows you’ll have a new topic for your hub after a hike in the woods.

Find the best trails in your area. An early morning start with a steaming hot coffee or chocolate to take with you will wake your tired nerves. Get away from hubbing for a day and spend time out into the woods, hike and walk inside and out the trails, up and down the hills, capture nature at its best time and breathe in some fresh air. If the area you have picked exhibits an amazing sunset, then behold, do not leave without snapping a picture.

Below are just two samples of beautiful trail hikes that I have been and I wanted to share with you. If you have the adventurous drive within you, trail hikes, biking, canoeing and the mere thought of being hopeful to encounter wildlife (deer, coyote, fox and owls) right before your eyes would be perfect. If the animals are not in the open to be visible to you, it is no way of regretting. Organize a walk to urban parks, countryside fields or farms. There is an infinite number of ways how to spend time outdoors to pluck out fatigue from your shoulders. Taking yourself out is a boost to feeling dynamic, transcending from an inactive position at home of writing hubs for long periods of time.


Let’s kick high!

In beautiful and perfect weather conditions, we do not want to waste the day. Start your day with a hearty breakfast, prepare the durable water bottles with fresh water or if you have a camel backpack (it is much convenient), a hot drink in a thermal mug (refrain from paper cups to avoid littering), pack-up some snacks, a camera and feed your dog on time. Dress for the weather and stay hands-free and comfortable with your stuff by carrying a small backpack. Start off with determining your trail hike distances and number of hours you want to spend depending where your eager feet would take as a destination spot.

The best views and terrains to go hiking are around the wide Scarborough area where I live. Awesome sceneries can be observed in the provincial parks and vast conservation areas. It is easy trailing within these parks with provided markings along trails, mapped trails and warning signage about coyotes, other animals and birds to watch and poisonous plants to avoid. You do not want to be lost in the woods. If you have a dog, keep your pet always close to you and within your vicinity. Discourage your dog from wandering alone.

One story shared by a trail guide during our “Owl Watch” on a winter night, a guided nature hike, was about a woman and her little poodle. She had taken her pooch out for a walk just around her neighbourhood and removed the leash off the dog’s collar. This woman and her dog are residents near a conservation area of a valley park. A great owl swiftly dove towards her dog and ripped the innocent pooch right before her eyes. She was helpless and in grief. It is a really sad story that we all heard from our guide and he quickly switched back to informing us to never have your dog off leash in the night.

We have explored a few urban trails and it is not just a one-time experience. We like going back and try a different trail route. But there are still more to explore. I like nature to be a sanctuary for my soul and mind. We need tranquility, beauty and peace in ourselves once in a while, and I feel that these aspects that we seek within us in our daily lives can be cherished out there in nature parks and in the urban wilderness of God-given gifts to us.


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The Scarborough Bluffs, Scarborough Ontario

The Bluffs of sandstone cliffs is a great choice to spend time if you are looking for a water view and lookouts at the same time. The waterfront wraps along the Scarborough Bluff or Bluffer’s Park and extends along Lake Ontario. The bluffs are high and the highest escarpment rises to 65 meters (213 ft.) from its foot. There are inner trails of white, dusty pebbled paths that will lead you to miles of walks where roadside flowers meet to greet you a warm welcome. These roadside flowers are as pretty as you think to which they are commonly ignored by passersby and visitors of the place.

Part of the park, you will enjoy a view of a number of colourful sails across the waters. The Bluffer’s Boating Federation is a home for hundreds of boats. Picnic areas in the park, a sandy beach, families, pets and romantic couples fill in a beautiful picturesque against the blue backdrop.

Learn more about Scarborough Bluffs and its history, geology and even issues about erosion in the area at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scarborough_Bluffs

Afternoon at Scarborough Bluffs
Afternoon at Scarborough Bluffs | Source
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Rouge River Park & Conservation Area

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The Rouge Park and Conservation Area

Rouge River Park offers wide variable landscapes and a painted sky reflecting in the river during sundown. Fishing enthusiasts take their tackle boxes along with patience to fish. I enjoy simple walks along the river, kicking sand on the beach, watching people and seagulls with my camera on hand. Camping within Glen Rouge and canoeing at the marshes on Rouge Beach are just one of the attractive things to experience.

For more thrill, venture the woods and keep safe along the trail markings and signs. A hike to Rouge Park’s Conservation Area can be an adventurous experience on chances meeting wildlife and birds such as a blue jay, a cardinal or a woodpecker. Walking inside the trails, we came across a number of garter snakes basking in the sun and in and out the dead leaves. The trails have interesting ecosystem of varied types of mushrooms and flowering plants that man must avoid getting them damaged, but help reserve nature and its natural environment. Be ready with a camera; you’ll never know what lies ahead and what you’ll be amazed to see.

ABOUT THE ROUGE

The Rouge Valley Park offers a wide variety of exploration. Below are brief descriptions of where your next adventure will take you.

The Rouge's Celebration Forest Trail - short hiking trail 0.5 km

  • Choose your trails wisely and be attentive about the signs around you for safety.
  • When you are inside or atop the valley, you will be surrounded with forests.
  • A memorial sign of the people who have loved Rouge Park and served contributions to help preserve it.
  • Wild by its nature are a variety of plant and animal life that grow and feed along the edge between the forest and meadow.

The Glen Rouge Campground

  • Choose your area, set up your tent and observe cleanliness around you to help protect you, nature and the park as a whole.
  • Glen Rouge Campground is located on the banks of Rouge River and is the only camping area in whole Toronto.
  • The stars are a great sight, so remember to look up or sleep under the stars.
  • Other attractions that are close to the campground are the hiking trails and a wide sandy beach on the north side.
  • Location: Highway 2 and Kingston Road
  • Open all week during the season

The Glen Eagles Vista - 0.6 km stretched trail

  • A wonderful scenic view if you are hiking along the open edges of the valley. The area offers viewpoints of the Rouge River and Little Rouge Creek valleys.
  • It is most colourful during the autumn season, so make sure you bring a camera with you to capture its beautiful palette.
  • This is an easy to hike flat trail. Just be extra careful during wet conditions.
  • Easy to navigate for adventurers in wheelchairs and strollers.
  • Location: At Meadowvale Road, northbound; Twyn Rivers Drive
  • Open year-round

The Rouge Beach

  • On the far stretch of shorelines, the Rouge River meets up and kisses its cousin, the Lake Ontario.
  • Rouge Beach exhibits its own marshes full interesting wildlife having the wetlands as their habitat. Since Rouge Park is the biggest in Toronto, so as its marshes that offers the best and largest of wetland experience.
  • If you'd like to bask or swim, the sandy beaches is very popular for everyone.
  • Walk over to the Rouge River Delta, pick a quiet spot, put out your fishing rod, and fish. This river gives a pretty sunset setting in the background.
  • Location: Rouge Hill Drive
  • Open on foot or on wheels during Spring, Summer and Fall; and is only accessible for pedestrians during winter.

Trail Heads - accessible by hikers and bikers. Keep dogs on leash.

The Twyn Rivers Area

  • Accessible from here are the four major trails: Orchard, Vista, Mast and Riverside.
  • You will find the remains of an old dam in the creek built during 1950s where once stood a hotel popularized by swimming within the dammed river and skiing on the hillsides.
  • Close to the area are the remains of an old orchard and a farm.
  • Location: Twin Rivers Drive
  • Open year-round

The Woodlands Area - 1.5 flat ground for easy trail; For a bit strenous trail hike, go for the 2.7 km trail. Challenge brings out the best in your experience outdoors.

  • Inside the Woodlands, you will have a view of the forests and the meadows and Little Rouge Creek.
  • Sounds of birds fills the air. Take with you your binoculars perhaps you will not just be watching the birds but witness wildlife as well. The Woodlands has a variety of natural habitats.
  • There is a good observation on the ecosystems. Please follow the rules to protect them.
  • Location: Reesor Road & Steeles
  • Open year-round


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Rouge River DeltaThe Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, Toronto, Ontario. The Rouge Park is the largest urban park in North America. Sunset in Rouge River Fishing at Rouge RiverAt Rouge BeachRouge VistaDeer skullSnakes come out basking in the sunRoadside flowerRouge Park, Toronto Ontario
Rouge River Delta
Rouge River Delta | Source
The Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, Toronto, Ontario. The Rouge Park is the largest urban park in North America.
The Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, Toronto, Ontario. The Rouge Park is the largest urban park in North America. | Source
Sunset in Rouge River
Sunset in Rouge River | Source
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Fishing at Rouge River
Fishing at Rouge River | Source
At Rouge Beach
At Rouge Beach | Source
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Rouge Vista
Rouge Vista | Source
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Deer skull
Deer skull | Source
Snakes come out basking in the sun
Snakes come out basking in the sun | Source
Roadside flower
Roadside flower | Source
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Rouge Park, Toronto Ontario
Rouge Park, Toronto Ontario | Source

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    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
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      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      greatstuff, what an early morning treat to see you comment here. I have been too going blank of ideas even diving to the bottom-most of boredom. I have never put time in writing when I was younger, except for poetry with the inspiration to write them because of young love, lol, (so corny). I am already in my late 40s when I joined HubPages and I am really enjoying writing something. But yes, there are certain moments we get hit by a tsunami knocking us down with nothing; it would be much better if it is a tsunami of ideas rising above our heads!

      Thank you greatstuff for hiking to my hub. Have a good day to you! Cheers!

    • greatstuff profile image

      Mazlan 4 years ago from Malaysia

      You are lucky to live in an area with 'good weather' . Going hiking in tropical country is no fun. It is hot & humid. I do agree with you though that taking a break from writing will bring back that juice. My thinking cap has gone blank and fortunately my office travel 'forces' me to be away from hubbing and I am now feeling refreshed and ready to start on a new hub! Thanks for your encouragement.

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
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      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 5 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      Hi Deb! You are absolutely right. I like the feeling of the after-hike-muscle-strain and it is a great way to breathe fresh air and unclog our minds. Yesterday, we went up to hike again through a different trail, the Cedar Trail at the same Rouge Valley Park. Rouge Park is so huge and has multiple trails to experience and discover. Thank you for your kind input. Have a good day and cheers!

    • DeborahNeyens profile image

      Deborah Neyens 5 years ago from Iowa

      I love to hike. It's great exercise and a great way to clear the mind. It would be a great way to get over writer's block, too, because nature is so inspiring. Thanks for sharing your hikes and beautiful photographs!

    • coffeegginmyrice profile image
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      Marites Mabugat-Simbajon 5 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

      Hey passthejelly (I like that name) thanks a lot for stopping by!

    • passthejelly profile image

      Mark Passarelli 5 years ago from Lakewood Colorado

      Wow the pictures in this hub are great. Great read!