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Travelin'

  1. tksensei profile image60
    tksenseiposted 7 years ago

    Someone in another thread said, "not moving from a small burb in NE shows a lack of curiosity in the world" and it struck me as unfair and illogical to say so, but I was wondering what everyone else thought.

    Doesn't matter who said it or in what context because I don't want this to be about any personal issues. I just thought it might be an interesting topic to consider.

  2. profile image0
    Leta Sposted 7 years ago

    Why don't you ask Sarah Palin, wink.

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      What do you mean?

      1. profile image0
        Leta Sposted 7 years ago in reply to this

        Illogical is assuming anyone who has ever tangled with you (and they know who they are) would ever be frank with you.  lol  You do marvelous things for my fan club, though, whenever I talk to you, so ya can't be all bad, wink.

  3. yoshi97 profile image87
    yoshi97posted 7 years ago

    Having lived many places as a child, I'm not sure I can fairly assess this one. What I can say is that I am firmly rooted now (due to commitments in life) and I am more curious about the world than I ever was before.

    Of course, my curiosity stems far beyond the big blue marble we all call home, as I watch a lot of the Discovery channel - 'The Universe in particular' and wonder what it might be like elsewhere.

    I'm thinking the statement was a cryptic way of saying we should all have the curiosity to see beyond the pastures we reside and be willing to step outside the safe boundaries we call home, though I don't believe actually doing so makes us a better person - it just makes us adventurous.

    Heck, the Egyptians stayed put in the Nile Valley for thousands of years and look at the great culture they developed ... much of it by watching their fellow neighbors and bringing that culture back home to their own people. If they could do it ... then so could we. smile

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Interesting, thanks.

  4. profile image0
    Nelle Hoxieposted 7 years ago

    You can have roots, be a small towner, and still know the world.

    Matt and I live across the street from my mother, share a duplex with my aunt, and live next door to my sister. But I had been around the world twice before my 25th birthday. I also lived in Philadelphia, Tapei, and Cambridge, MA, before I moved back to my hometown permanently.

    Matt travels the world for his job, and I like to tag along whenever possible. I think I have the best of both worlds.

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Good point.




      That must be nice.

  5. profile image0
    Nelle Hoxieposted 7 years ago

    Yes it is nice. Auntie Gladys is 98 years old, and still gardens everyday. And she really gardens, lifing heavy pots, pulling up weeds, and carrying everything in an old-fashioned heavy wooded wheelbarrow.

    She also roots for the Red Sox and Patriots.

    She was surgical scrub nurse for nearly 50 years.

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Next time you see her, give her a big hug from me!

  6. mugshot profile image75
    mugshotposted 7 years ago

    Im a well travelled person and I am looking to move from the UK to Bulgaria.

    I think that yes there is a big world out there but someone wishing to stay in a certain area doesnt mean they lack curiosity. If anything they probably wish to stay there as the people they love reside in the area, why travel to a place where you dont know anyone if you have a very close family that all live in one small town.

    Its each to their own, some people wish to venture into the big wide world, some people want to read about it but stay close to the ones they love.

    1. tksensei profile image60
      tksenseiposted 7 years ago in reply to this

      Well said.

  7. lrohner profile image85
    lrohnerposted 7 years ago

    I grew up and continue to live in a small New England burb and yet I am more well-traveled than the average American. For six years I lived and worked in Miami which has to be the most transient city in the world. The lack of roots, culture and tradition had me missing home so badly that I couldn't wait to get back.

    Outside of my stint in Miami, I've always lived within a town or two of the city I was born in. Now that I'm officially an empty-nester, I considered moving much further away and getting a little house on the shoreline. My children, even though all but one are in school out of state, were horrified. There's just something about coming back to their roots and having Mom and all of their oldest and dearest friends around that really means something to them.

  8. tksensei profile image60
    tksenseiposted 7 years ago

    Might be better to address the topic instead of me personally. That's why I said "I don't want this to be about any personal issues" from the outset.

    A little self control, please.

 
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