Rare dog breeds

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  1. Jesus was a hippy profile image60
    Jesus was a hippyposted 6 years ago

    My friend has a cross between a Shit-tsu and a poodle. It looks a bit like a terrier but she calls it a shit-poo.

    Do you have a rare cross breed?

    1. Bedbugabscond profile image96
      Bedbugabscondposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      My sister has a strange little dog. It is a cress between a dachshund and a chiwawa, and is called a chiweenie. It is a really cute dog, but its legs and head seem strangely disproportional to its body, making it resemble a bobble head.

      1. jennzie profile image83
        jennzieposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Aww chiweenies are so cute!

    2. jennzie profile image83
      jennzieposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I've never seen one of those, but I love the name. lol

  2. Shaddie profile image85
    Shaddieposted 6 years ago

    That's not rare at all. Anyone can take a common shih-tzu and a common poodle and set them up to produce offspring. In fact I'm pretty sure hideous cross-breeds are more common these days than the actual breeds they come from.

    If you want to talk rare dog breeds, try Swedish valhunds, Mudis, Ibezan hounds, Klee kais, and Borzois.

    1. SmartAndFun profile image96
      SmartAndFunposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      I had never heard of klee kais until a hub about them came across my feed a few months ago. They are adorable. I would love to have one! I believe they are basically miniature huskies, if I remember correctly.
      http://s3.hubimg.com/u/6890398_f248.jpg

      1. Shaddie profile image85
        Shaddieposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Yes, they are designed to look like miniature Siberians. Interesting little dogs, I've only met two in real life smile

        1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
          Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          I've always wanted one of those!

  3. agilitymach profile image96
    agilitymachposted 6 years ago

    In the dog world, the discussion of the crosses as actual "breeds" is very hotly debated, and with good reason.  Crossing two pure bred dogs does not create a new "breed."  Unfortunately genetics doesn't work that way.

    In order to create a stable gene pool in any breed of dog, it takes generations of breeding and choosing the right sire/dam combination to bring together the desired traits of a new breed.  It takes a complete understanding of genetics.  A close and detailed log of the ancestors of the dogs have to be kept.  DNA profiling is also helpful.  Examination of the bad traits in the new breed must be looked at with eyes wide open so that no genetic diseases, structural issues, etc. creep into the new breed.

    This takes decades to develop, but over decades and decades, the gene pool in the breed begins to stabilize, and the dogs born to parents of the new breed begin to have the same physical, emotional and instinctual characteristics.

    Therefore, crossing a pure bred Poodle with a Shih tzu only results in a mixed breed dog.  Nothing more.  No name is associated with it.  The cute names come from unscrupulous breeders who are trying to make money on the "designer mutt" craze.  However, this is a scam.

    Poodles are used heavily in the scam because the irresponsible breeders looking to make a fast buck will claim the puppies of a poodle/whatever cross will be hypoallergenic.  Studies have shown there is no such thing.  They will also claim the dogs won't shed because poodles don't shed.  Of course, all dogs shed to some extent, as do people. The issue here is that the poodle coat gene will only be passed onto a small portion of the pups.  The rest will get a coat like the other pure bred in the mix, or they will get something in between.  But the gene pool is so unstable, there is no way that the poodle coat will be passed on to all the dogs - or even in it's pure poodle state.

    Another reason this scam works is poodle mixes are just flat cute.  So breeders eager for your money will also show adorable puppies, sell them as a true "breed," and make money.

    Now the OP did easily admit this is a cross breed, and kudos to him/her.  That is fantastic.  But as far as actually "naming" them, there is no real breed name as there is no real breed.

    This may be more than you wanted to know, but education on puppy purchases is very important.  People actually pay over $1,000 for these mixed breed dogs.  And, btw, I have no problem with mixes.  They are great dogs.  But when you pay high dollar for a "breed" dog, you are paying for a stable gene pool - that is it.  With a "designer mutt," you simply aren't getting what you're paying for genetically.

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    1. Shaddie profile image85
      Shaddieposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Agreed... Crosses are quite ridiculous.

    2. Melissa A Smith profile image98
      Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      "Examination of the bad traits in the new breed must be looked at with eyes wide open so that no genetic diseases, structural issues, etc. creep into the new breed"

      Producers of many breeds seem to miss the bus on that one.

      1. agilitymach profile image96
        agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Unfortunately it is very true.

        1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
          Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          Yes, great post on Shaddie's hub regarding btw. I forgot that altering dogs can be necessary for some hunting breeds. I feel that much of the breeding done is now for some bizarre sense of aesthetics, and not for practicality.

          1. agilitymach profile image96
            agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            I would agree.  It's rather disturbing.

  4. Nouveau Skeptic profile image74
    Nouveau Skepticposted 6 years ago

    It's a clever way to charge a lot of money for a mutt.

    1. agilitymach profile image96
      agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, it unfortunately is as most of these dogs are bred from parents who do not have any health tests done for genetic disease nor any research into their ancestors for genetic issues. This leaves the pups completely open to possible health issues.  It also leaves the pups future owners liable for possible large future vet bills!

      Some people are always looking for ways to make a fast, unscrupulous buck.

      1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
        Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

        Am I to understand that this means that pure breds are generally more healthy than mutts? Here is a disturbing picture I took yesterday.

        http://s3.hubimg.com/u/6895022_f248.jpg

        1. agilitymach profile image96
          agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

          The debate on mixed breed vigor rages.

          To be fair, you took a picture of one of the breeds that has been so outrageously "deformed" through breeding that it can easily be debated that the breed has intentional in=bred health concerns.  The short snout being only one of them. 

          Also this picture shows a dog who is probably obese (I can't get my hands on him to feel for muscle tone and ribs, but visually it looks to be so.)  This isn't an issue with pure-bred vs. mixes, but a problem with the owners overfeeding.

          However, most breeds are not so intentionally altered through breeding, and both pure breds and mixes can have owners who overfeed (and often do in the US).

          So for the breeds that are not breed for such exaggerated looks OR breeds that are known to have disease issues (Basenjis, for instance, are known to have issues with inherited cancers), it is, IMO, a toss up whether pure breds or mixes are more healthy.  In my personal opinion, pure breds win out structure wise with the breeds that are not overly exaggerated.

          For the breeds that were especially bred for work, like Goldens, Shelties, Collies, Australian Cattle Dogs, if purchased from a responsible breeder, you can find decent structure.  But with a mix and especially a cross, the structure tends to be a blend of different breeds, causing issues with proper angulation.  Now, this is a generalization, mind you.  I've seen several mixes with great structure, and, as the above photo shows, we can also do horrible things intentionally breeding structure.

          But for many working breeds, structure tends to continue to be a vocal point, and many breeders are still producing nice working structure in their dogs.

          And as far as breeding in diseases, one of the advantages of choosing a pure bred is that you already know the diseases common to the breed.  You can do your research and find lines that will test against these diseases and greatly improve your chances of a healthy dog.  Of course, there are breeders making a fast buck on pure breds too that do not do any disease research into the pup's history, and thus breed in those diseases.  However, a responsible puppy buyer will have chosen their breeder wisely. 

          The entire story is that any future puppy purchaser needs to do their research.  IMO getting a pup from a shelter is the best thing for almost everyone to do.  However if you need a form for function dog, then going to a breeder is necessary.  I, personally, need form for function dogs and do go to breeders, although I have owned rescues as well.  It takes me years to pick the breeder and the exact breeding for my pups.  Right now I'm in that process of looking around, and have limited my search to only a few breeders.  Pet owners should do due diligence as well when picking out their next family member, and shelter dogs should be first on the list for most folks!!!

          1. Melissa A Smith profile image98
            Melissa A Smithposted 6 years agoin reply to this

            Yes, I chose the bulldog as an obvious example of purebred deformity, but many less odd looking dogs have bad health problems. What makes you think this dog looks obese? A quick google search of 'bulldog' shows they all look this way. Although it wouldn't surprise me, that this breed cannot get sufficient exercise because of its debilitated breathing and body form.

            1. agilitymach profile image96
              agilitymachposted 6 years agoin reply to this

              One of the unfortunate "trends" in conformation these days is fat, obese dogs.  Labs come to mind right away.  One of my student shows Labs in conformation and has gotten so disgusted with horribly - and I do mean horribly - obese Labs winning in the show ring that she has quit showing.  These dogs are so fat that if they were to actually hunt, they'd die. Labs are really suffering from "The Top 10 Syndrome," I'm afraid, although there are good breeders out there.

              Like I said, I'd need to get my hands on this fellow to know if he was obese.  The more barrel chested breeds can look obese and not be.  Also, so can the very furry breeds.  The only true way to know is to get my hands on them.  I just feel this guy needs to lose a few more pounds.  It could also be that I'm so used to seeing this breed overweight that I'm assuming, without putting my hands on him, that he is too. smile

 
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