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Is a found object sculpture?

  1. June McEwan profile image78
    June McEwanposted 6 years ago

    If you found something beautiful in the landscape. Does removing it and calling it art make it so? Is it still beautiful? What's changed, if anything?

    1. Greek One profile image79
      Greek Oneposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Not sure about art, but depending on who owns the land in the landscape in question, it can be called 'theft" smile

      1. June McEwan profile image78
        June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

        Hee Hee. Excellent answer

  2. Stacie L profile image87
    Stacie Lposted 6 years ago

    I have found some driftwood that looked like a sculpture...
    and I called it art. wink

    1. June McEwan profile image78
      June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Yes, I suppose nature and time would have worked on the original branch and make it into perhaps the best kind of art. Have you put it intooa surrounding that suits?

  3. Hestia DeVoto profile image61
    Hestia DeVotoposted 6 years ago

    There is a long history in art of using found objects as sculpture.  The main thing that changes junk or stuff into "art" is someone's intention.

    1. June McEwan profile image78
      June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      What's the best way of declaring that intention without changing the object?

  4. ChristineVianello profile image59
    ChristineVianelloposted 6 years ago

    I believe its art

  5. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    "Is a found object sculpture?' You can call anything anything. But you can't just throw anything lying around into an art museum, or what would be the point.

    1. June McEwan profile image78
      June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Good point!

  6. Ritsos profile image60
    Ritsosposted 6 years ago

    Not really ... that doesn't negate it being aesthetically pleasing or challenging but it isn't created so certainly isn't human art unless it is altered in some way. I have a piece of driftwood which I like to look at and think it looks artistic but twasn't created ... If I pick a bunch of flowers and stick them in a vase that wouldn't be art .,,.... would it?

    1. June McEwan profile image78
      June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I don't know! But flower arranging is well thought of. Especially in Japan.

  7. knolyourself profile image60
    knolyourselfposted 6 years ago

    Point is if you are going to have a museum defined as a holder of art works, you have to have rules as to what gets in and what stays out. Not necessarily that these rules constitute the best definitions for what is art, toilets and bathtubs, but something.

  8. marshacanada profile image75
    marshacanadaposted 6 years ago

    If you find something and do something creative with it like: carve it, sand and finish and reshape it, decorate it, paint it.
    Then you can call it art. If you just find something great created by nature or chance you can call it a thing of beauty. if you take great photos of it you may have created great art.
    http://s1.hubimg.com/u/4696684_f248.jpg

    1. June McEwan profile image78
      June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      I like that. The art is the image you've taken of the subject- you haven't interfered with the object in the landscape, and, it's left there for others to come upon to enjoy in the same way.

  9. Hugh Williamson profile image87
    Hugh Williamsonposted 6 years ago

    IMO, if it's art to you, then it is art.

  10. anabrea profile image61
    anabreaposted 6 years ago

    There is plenty of support in the history of modern and contemporary art for calling it art as long as there is an intervention with artistic intent. The very act of removing it from its natural context may be enough of an intervention: There are no rules about what is a valid intervention with artistic intent.

    1. June McEwan profile image78
      June McEwanposted 6 years ago in reply to this

      Would 'one' have to then, declare that intention, perhaps by writing something about it?

 
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