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Freewriting?

  1. jdeschene profile image60
    jdescheneposted 8 years ago

    Hey everyone!

    How many people here enjoy freewriting?  Personally, I love it.  One thing I've discovered is that there are tons of different ways to do it.  I like to set a timer for five minutes and just start writing.  Sometimes I'll try to control the shape of it and sometimes I'll just let it be whatever it will be.  How do you freewrite?

    Also, I just published one of my freewrites here on HubPages:
    http://hubpages.com/hub/misskibble

    Feel free to take a look.

    Much love,
    John

  2. Marisa Wright profile image94
    Marisa Wrightposted 8 years ago

    I'd never heard the expression "freewriting" before.   I had a giggle at your Hub - it created a wonderfully mad picture, still trying to make sense of it all!

    I agree that just writing what comes into your head is a good exercise.  What bothers me, though, is the number of internet writers who do that all the time - and never edit.  The result is, more often than not, a stream-of-consciousness ramble that goes on far too long and ends up being indigestible. 

    You're obviously far beyond that style of "freewriting"!

    1. jdeschene profile image60
      jdescheneposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Well, sometimes, that's the fun of it.  Those kinds of freewrites loosen you up and help you get out what's really on your mind.  Then, usually you can pick out certain topics that interest you.  Don't underestimate stream-of-consciousness.

      However, if shaped freewrites are more your thing, then I'd like to reccommend you read "Fast Fiction" by Roberta Allen.  It gives you a five minute writing exercise based on a prompt, such as "Write a story about food."  And then you write for five minutes, and what results in sometimes a workable short story.  Try it out.

      And thanks for looking at my hub!  I'm glad you enjoyed it.

      1. Marisa Wright profile image94
        Marisa Wrightposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        Not saying I underestimate it - it's fine as a starting point. I just wish people wouldn't then publish it as an article or story exactly "as is".  For most writers - especially newbies - it is often far from ready to see daylight!

        1. jdeschene profile image60
          jdescheneposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          Ah, yes.  I can see your point.  It has it's place which, for the most part, probably isn't here, at least not without proper warning to the reader.

  3. WHoArtNow profile image83
    WHoArtNowposted 8 years ago

    I love to free-write, but I'd never publish any, my mind is a warped place and I wouldn't want to scare any of my fellow hubbers!

    1. jdeschene profile image60
      jdescheneposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      In my opinion, the more warped, the better!  I'd love to see just how warped your mind can be!

      1. Amber Korn profile image57
        Amber Kornposted 8 years ago in reply to this

        One persons idea of warped, may be another persons idea of sanctuary.  As for those who view the writings of a "Newbie" as a test to ones patience if the writing does not meet their standard of intellectual content don't read it.  Nobody will twist your arm.  To express yourself in a literary forum is a unique and liberating experience to everyone.  It is a form of expression with anonymity,  I believe the only way to become a truly worthy writer is to have an open mind,  and the ability to see the intention of the art form no matter how crude.  So, I say write, no matter how warped you presume your writing to be their is always someone who will read it.

        1. jdeschene profile image60
          jdescheneposted 8 years ago in reply to this

          That's quite a profound statement, one with which I wholeheartedly agree.  It seems, though, that people find such great difficulty in being so open.  Like all of our first attempts feel similar to pushing against the current that's run our lives for so long. 

          Amber, It's refreshing to hear someone else say what's been in my head for a long time.  smile

  4. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    Freewriting can be a great read if the writer is good - and a punishment when he isn't smile

    Love James Joyce and feel that stream of consciousness can be powerful writing!

    1. jdeschene profile image60
      jdescheneposted 8 years ago in reply to this

      Do you have any James Joyce recommendations?

  5. Shalini Kagal profile image80
    Shalini Kagalposted 8 years ago

    A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses - preferably in that order.

 
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