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jump to last post 1-2 of 2 discussions (4 posts)

If you could sell a car of choice what would it be and what would be the talking

  1. tsmog profile image83
    tsmogposted 11 months ago

    If you could sell a car of choice what would it be and what would be the talking points to sell it?

  2. alancaster149 profile image86
    alancaster149posted 11 months ago

    Not so much a car as an all terrain vehicle, Tim. I've had four Land Rovers in the past.
    First was a 1981 Series III 88 inch wheelbase conversion from 'hardtop' (van) to estate with an old Land Rover four cylinder 2.5 diesel engine and power out-take for tools etc (that I never used, but you can set how fast the engine 'idles' for fuel economy). I had it painted Land Rover 'Masai Red' (almost wine-coloured).
    Second was a mid-green 1971 Series IIa 109 inch (lwb) with 4 cylinder 2.5 petrol engine. She was a thirsty maid, as they usually are when they get over 20 years under their belts. If I'd kept her I wouldn't have had to pay the extortionate road tax drivers in the UK pay, and she was strong! Pull away up a 1 in 5 (20%) incline from standing without much trouble.
    Third was another 1981 Series III, blue, this time 109 inch with Perkins 300 diesel engine that wasn't suitable for fast running. 55 mph was about her mark. I 'killed it off' doing 60 mph then had a Land Rover Turbo-diesel 230 fitted. That worked its way through my old gear box like a hot knife through butter so a Land Rover 5-speed gearbox was fitted, along with the Kenlowe fan allowing me to do over 60 mph without trouble. A bit shaky over 65 though! Somebody half-inched (pinched) that one early in 2012 after it had passed its annual MoT (Ministry of Transport roadworthiness test).
    So a few months later I bought another used 'Landie', this time an Epsom Green Discovery 1 Tdi (turbo-diesel injection). It did all right, got up to 70+ mph on the level, and she could climb! And she was quieter than the other ones - but she had issues. the sill had gone and i'd have had to pay more to get that done than I bought her for.
    Which would I go back in time for in my trusty Time Machine? The Series IIa could've been fitted with a Tdi 230/300, new gearbox and I'd have had no road tax to pay (we pay more taxes in the UK than anyone else in the EU, so one lot of tax less to pay would've been a bonus!) She was a beauty, believe me, in her dark green paint, limestone coloured roof and wheel hubs. A proper Bobby-dazzler, no mistake.
    At the moment I drive my daughter's 2003 VW Polo and dream of winning the money for another 'Landie' before I get too old to appreciate them.

    1. tsmog profile image83
      tsmogposted 11 months agoin reply to this

      Easily Rovers are the choice. What kind of roadways in your neck of the woods. Is it rural living with hills?

    2. alancaster149 profile image86
      alancaster149posted 11 months agoin reply to this

      I live a half hour drive from Epping Forest. Beyond that are tracks for 'Green laning', i.e. not exactly off-roading but going that way. I did my proper off-roading up on forestry or moorland tracks in the North York Moors and Dales National Parks

 
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