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Using the "Eeewww" factor to get traffic

  1. janshares profile image89
    jansharesposted 3 years ago

    I've been noticing hubs in the Health section with images I refer to as having the "eeeewww" factor. These are hubs with gross images you would turn away from while eating. They include rashes,  cysts, cuts, bumps, ulcers, moles, or any other image supporting the topic disease or ailment of the hub.
    I'm not saying using these images as a "eeewww" factor is the sole intent of the author but I'd love to hear from some hubbers who write these hubs if it impacts traffic. Does it help? Just curious about the "stop to look at the accident" phenomenon.

    1. Marisa Wright profile image94
      Marisa Wrightposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      I daresay it would help, but health in general isn't a good topic to write on.   There are so many hospitals, specialists and health bodies offering advice on their websites, and Google favours them heavily, so it's tough to get ranked.   You really need to be offering something unique or answering a question no one else is, to get traffic.

      1. janshares profile image89
        jansharesposted 3 years ago in reply to this

        I was thinking the same, Marisa. Seems that for serious issues, searches would go straight to WebMD and the like for answers.

  2. Gcrhoads64 profile image96
    Gcrhoads64posted 3 years ago

    Hi, janshares.
    I have hubs that use the "eeewww" factor. I use pictures which not only illustrate what I am writing about, but which also tempt a person who has searched for my topic to click on my hub.
    I don't know if it actually impacts traffic. Some hubs get okay traffic, others not so much.
    I hope this helps. smile

    1. janshares profile image89
      jansharesposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Thank you, Gcrhoads64 for your reply. It definitely helps. It makes sense that images tempt and draw readers into the article. We'll see if someone else shares their experience with increased traffic.

  3. psycheskinner profile image81
    psycheskinnerposted 3 years ago

    Gross medical pictures have also got hubs unpublished.  There is a limit before it is so explicit it will turn off advertisers.

    1. janshares profile image89
      jansharesposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Interesting, didn't know that, psycheskinner, thanks for the info. I've seen some really gross stuff. I guess authors weigh how far they'll push the envelope to get readers against how it may get them in trouble.

  4. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image93
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 3 years ago

    Jan - this is an interatung discussion post.  I've not yet run into these types of health images (I certainly believe they are on the site, though), but I do see how a writer could include specific examples of a condition that has visual symptoms.

    If someone wonders whether a mole might be the wrong kind of growth, or what a certain bump or redness might signify, photos would be very helpful. I agree, there's a 'yuck' factor, but as long as something is not violating other standards (sexual images), I can understand why those images would be useful and appropriate.

    As to whether there's an underlying goal if attracting traffic due to the sensationalism element, well, we see various other strategies used for that, too.  At least there's some level of utility in hubs about icky health issues (the Ewwww thing).  I can't say the same about things like the (endless) Indian Auntie hubs, which are design to attract other types of attention.

    1. janshares profile image89
      jansharesposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      You're right, Marcy. The health hubs and use of images do have a purpose and good intent. I've never looked at an Auntie hub but I've heard of them. The intent of those types of hubs are obvious and are meant to attract a certain audience.

  5. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image93
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 3 years ago

    I agree with both of you - hubs cannot compete with pieces on a site that has authority.  However, some of my assigned hubs with the AP were about health, and are among the ones that get the most hits. No gaudy photos, though.

    1. janshares profile image89
      jansharesposted 3 years ago in reply to this

      Good info is good info, especially when it's well-presented.

 
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