Learned a new turn of phrase today ...

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  1. Arachnea profile image77
    Arachneaposted 3 years ago

    Today, while watching Worricker: Salting the Battlefield, I caught a turn of phrase that send me rolling on the floor laughing my keister off. The phrase was, "booze cruise." Is this phrase relevant to anyone at all? If you use this phrase or one similar, what is it and what does it mean?

    1. sallybea profile image99
      sallybeaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      A booze cruise is generally a trip you make to somewhere like France to buy cheap liquor for the holiday season.

      1. Phyllis Doyle profile image96
        Phyllis Doyleposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        OMGosh! That reminds me of when we used to vacation in Tahoe, California. It was extended family, filling up three separate cabins. The first day we arrived and got settled, we would make a trip up to a discount store in the mountains where we bought all the "refreshments" we needed for the week. Yes, that would be considered a "booze cruise". LOL Those were the days!

    2. Matthew Meyer profile image75
      Matthew Meyerposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      In the US it usually means a party on a boat where people drink.
      Many times with super cheap (low quality) alcohol.
      It feels more like an East Coast than West Coast thing (to me at least).
      Interesting that the same phrase means a different thing in Europe.
      The US version of the Office has an episode called "Booze Cruise" that was episode 11 of Season 2. (5 Jan. 2006) if you want a humorous example.

  2. janshares profile image96
    jansharesposted 3 years ago

    It's a term I believe orginated in the Caribbean islands, referring to an activity/excursion you sign up for while you're vacationing. It lasts about 2 hours, on a small boat, and all you do is party, i.e., drink rum punch, Bahama Mamas, etc., and dance.

    1. sallybea profile image99
      sallybeaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Wikipedia says it is Booze cruise is a British colloquial term for a brief trip from Britain to France or Belgium with the intent of taking advantage of lower prices, and buying personal supplies of (especially) alcohol or tobacco in bulk quantities'
      but guess this may not have been where the phrase originated.

      1. janshares profile image96
        jansharesposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Thanks for that history, sallybea. I had no idea. I actually thought your first post was a bit of humor. My first time hearing the term was on my first trip to the Bahamas some years ago. There is definitely a British-Caribbean connection so it seems that it's now a slang term for a good party. big_smile

        1. sallybea profile image99
          sallybeaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          it is more like gearing up for a party by preparing in advance, the cheap booze required for the party. The same applies to cigarettes.  People have to pay high prices for alcohol and cigarettes because the government puts such high taxes on them.  They can bring into the country legally for their own consumption but not enough to make a profit from it.   There is definitely a British connection.  Incidentally, I  love the Bahamas. I went there a couple of years ago.

          1. janshares profile image96
            jansharesposted 3 years agoin reply to this

            Thanks again. I love Bahamas, too. Been there 4 times.

  3. Millionaire Tips profile image93
    Millionaire Tipsposted 3 years ago

    It probably is regional.  I thought it was a party on a boat too.

  4. Jodah profile image90
    Jodahposted 3 years ago

    In Australia "booze" or "grog" are common terms for alcohol. We have "booze buses" which hotels(pubs) employ to pick up and drop off patrons so they can drink without having to worry about driving under the influence. They can afford to do this as a free service because people can drink more hence the hotel makes more money. A "booze cruise" is generally when a boat is hired probably to go to a nearby island or up a river with the main object for passengers to eat, drink and be merry.

    1. Phyllis Doyle profile image96
      Phyllis Doyleposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Is the Bachelor's Dance considered a booze cruise? I know, from your hub on it, that it is a very festive time that lasts all night.  smile

      1. Jodah profile image90
        Jodahposted 3 years agoin reply to this

        Haha Phyllis, no the Bachelors an Spinsters Ball would be called "a booze up" or "grog up"..the "cruise" would only be used if it was held on a boat. The eat, drink and be merry still applies however.

        1. Phyllis Doyle profile image96
          Phyllis Doyleposted 3 years agoin reply to this

          Ahhhh .... okay.  A "grog up" - I remember it is quite a celebration.

  5. Arachnea profile image77
    Arachneaposted 3 years ago

    Hmmm. Interesting how many variations there are for this phrase. I'm definitely going to have to use it in something I write.

  6. travmaj profile image83
    travmajposted 3 years ago

    Yes, from an Aussie point of view Jodah summed it up perfectly. A booze cruise is just as he says - a cruise with the main aim to - eat, drink, and be merry.

    1. sallybea profile image99
      sallybeaposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      The cruise in the UK refers to the trip you have to take in order to get across the water to Europe.  It could also apply to a trip taken through the rail tunnel to Europe.  The focus is on getting the alcohol for a good price legally.

  7. LongTimeMother profile image95
    LongTimeMotherposted 3 years ago

    Jodah, I can't believe you missed the chance to mention a pub crawl. lol.

    1. Jodah profile image90
      Jodahposted 3 years agoin reply to this

      Actually, I had considered it LTM, but didn't want people to think we were just a race of boozer..haha.  A "pub crawl" is where usually a group of people proceed from one pub to another having a couple of drinks in each. it continues until either you run out of pubs or can't drink any more (or stand up).

  8. colorfulone profile image83
    colorfuloneposted 3 years ago

    I would imagine a "booze cruise" around here would be a houseboat fishing vacation in the BWCAW. But, I suppose some of those large boats (and small) might have a well stocked bar, too.

  9. Arachnea profile image77
    Arachneaposted 3 years ago

    I guess this is one entertainment / vacation option I've yet to explore. Great to know there are so many ways to do so.

 
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