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"Legal" hub topics....

  1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
    DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years ago

    I realize we are not supposed to write hubs suggesting people break laws.

    How about a hub telling someone how to legally challenge and probably get out of a certain type of speeding ticket?

  2. paradigmsearch profile image86
    paradigmsearchposted 2 years ago

    The good news... Yes, you can do that.

    The bad news... Other Hubbers have beat you to it.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
      DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      Ah, pooey!

      1. paradigmsearch profile image86
        paradigmsearchposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        big_smile

        Maybe I spoke too soon. Check out to see if your certain type ticket has been covered. smile

        http://hubpages.com/search/include%3Ahu … g%2Bticket

        1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
          DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years ago in reply to this

          Checked through a few of those.  Most of the ones I read are
          1) not very good
          2) over 4 years old
          3) false advertising; not really dealing with the topic in the article, but referring you elsewhere
          4) unrealistic, and trying to help you get off, even if you were guilty....(when you should 'man up' instead)

          I'll consider my options, and perhaps publish my version anyway... Thanks, Paradigmsearch

          1. paradigmsearch profile image86
            paradigmsearchposted 2 years ago in reply to this

            It will no doubt be most worthy. I'll not only read it, I might even publicize it. big_smile

  3. MizBejabbers profile image89
    MizBejabbersposted 2 years ago

    Lizzy, as a journalist I can tell you that there are two ways to approach this. A sleazy way that tries to sneak out of a situation when you are guilty as sin, and a defense for a speeding ticket when you feel you are in the right. There is absolutely no reason why you can't publish advice on how to defend yourself against what you perceive as a wrong.
    I was covering a legal secretaries convention years ago and heard a cop tell the legal secretaries to let the traffic officer know that "you are one of the good guys" and ask for "professional courtesy" when stopped for speeding. He said that since the cop might not want to make the judge or lawyer they worked for angry, it might work. Now you can judge which category this falls under because I truly don't know.

    1. DzyMsLizzy profile image92
      DzyMsLizzyposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      I am definitely referring to the latter type, where you were not actually doing anything wrong, and where there is a high likelihood of an error of some sort on the part of the ticketing officer.

      I know that one time, I was stopped for running a red light, (which I did do, and on purpose), and got out of it on the spot.  It was nearly 2:a.m., and my husband felt like he was having a heart attack, and I was rushing him to the hospital.  (He's had many; we are all too familiar with the signs and symptoms.)  There was no traffic anyway, so it was obviously safe to proceed in spite of the red light.
      I simply told the officer that I was trying to get my husband to the ER, and that I would appreciate an escort instead of a ticket.  He could see that hubby was in distress; and I told him that it was faster for me to just take off and go, over waiting for the arrival of an ambulance.
      I didn't get the escort, but he did wave me on without issuing a ticket.

      1. MizBejabbers profile image89
        MizBejabbersposted 2 years ago in reply to this

        I'm glad you didn't get ticketed, and I hope everything went OK. I had to rush my hubby to the hospital in 1985 having a major heart attack. Like you, it was quicker than waiting on 20 minutes on an ambulance.  After I got him there, he was legally dead for 2 minutes and almost didn't  make it. Fortunately, I didn't encounter a policeman, but I would have asked for an escort just like you did.

  4. Marcy Goodfleisch profile image95
    Marcy Goodfleischposted 2 years ago

    If someone is legally challenging a ticket, they likely feel they have legal grounds.  I've challenged one and won by default - the officer didn't show up in court.  I later learned this wasn't unusual - it takes time for officers to appear, and it doesn't always happen. If the officer doesn't show up, the judge dismisses it.

    This reminds me . . . my car inspection expired December 31st.  Oh dear . . .

    1. paradigmsearch profile image86
      paradigmsearchposted 2 years ago in reply to this

      You are doomed...

 
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