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Which audience do you primarily write for?

  1. lorlie6 profile image83
    lorlie6posted 21 months ago

    Depending on which hub I am writing, my 'voice' tends to change.  Is this a common trait among writers?  I imagine so, but how do I go about this shift without alienating other readers?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image95
      paradigmsearchposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Hello, stranger. big_smile

      Different subjects equal different audiences. And by different audiences I mean different personalities, different intelligence levels, and all the rest of it.

      I really do write as if the targeted reader is about to receive it in the next room, who will then open the door and tell me their thoughts about what I wrote.

      1. lorlie6 profile image83
        lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

        Strange?  Indeed I am!
        And I quote, "write as if the targeted reader is about to receive it in the next room, who will then open the door and tell me their thoughts about what I wrote."
        Your imagery is to be remembered!

        1. paradigmsearch profile image95
          paradigmsearchposted 21 months agoin reply to this

          Been a long time.

          1. lorlie6 profile image83
            lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

            Yes, it has. wink

    2. tsmog profile image84
      tsmogposted 21 months agoin reply to this

      I don't think you can not alienate readers really. With that in mind I think audience is specific and the more the writer's voice is aimed at a particular audience, then the more attractive the article becomes. Subsequently a key is what audience the title draws as well as with the grabbing first paragraph, which announces a voice and perspective. And, too, the keyword is specific knowing all readers can be the that. Thus, I am taking the perspective as audience with this thought process. In that manner in mind my writer's voice certainly will change and likely at times dramatically.

      And, contrast is . . .

      You betcha' writer's voice will change. It depends on who is listening in and I got'sta know that and what they be looking for before I can drum any article for 'em. I got'sta know whom them is to know who me got'ta be to get the message across. Ya' see what I mean? 

      While . . .

      Who is listening? Why it's you and me and then any in earshot. Everyone has needs, but yours are important to me, so let's focus on you and that. If anybody sticks around then let the salt tossed over shoulder land and be known. Then we both may smile at the end and maybe someone else.

      1. lorlie6 profile image83
        lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

        As I read your first paragraph, I imagined a very specific audience, a group of doctors.  I do agree wholeheartedly that the key is to announce voice right off the bat, and with those doctors still in mind, I understand that even they may disagree.

  2. Jodah profile image92
    Jodahposted 21 months ago

    Lorlie6, I think most readers appreciate variety and if you are writing hubs in different genres etc I think it is only expected that your writing voice will change to suit. Some of my hubs are uplifting and inspirational, others deal with much darker subjects so my voice changes to suit the subject matter.
    Everything you write will not please everyone but your loyal readers will understand the need for diversity.

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Thanks for your reply, Jodah.  Niches seem so limiting, though I understand the appeal.

  3. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image99
    Wesman Todd Shawposted 21 months ago

    I noticed that when I write for Infobarrel.com my style changes a lot.  I've no clue why that is.  In any event, I'm certainly not writing anything for my friends here. Doesn't mean I dislike anyone, but I'm writing for Google and for Dollars, and to please myself with some work and creativity.

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      WTS, I'd say I am writing for dollars this time.  A unique experience for yours truly!

  4. janshares profile image97
    jansharesposted 21 months ago

    Really good question, lorlie6, especially with the new direction HP is taking with niche sites. It's an important question for writers to answer in order to appeal to and build an audience. I primarily write with parents in mind, as well as introspective/spiritually-minded people who are wanting to understand themselves better. I also write for couples and individuals having relationship conflicts. Whether it's an informative, researched article or a poem, my hubs usually fall into one of those categories. Jodah has offered really good advice. I don't think you should worry about alienating your readers as long as you're putting out great information.

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      I haven't used HP for so long, I'm afraid I don't know which direction you mean, but I'll try to re-acquaint myself with this site!  Since I mainly write to an audience troubled by addiction and mental illness, I think my style has become more 'memoir' than 'factual'.  Yes, introspective writing appeals to me as well, and hopefully to my readers.  I think intuition and self-knowledge are qualities I wish to stress to whatever audience I may attract.

  5. agilitymach profile image100
    agilitymachposted 21 months ago

    I write for my target audience.  I imagine who I am trying to reach, and I write to them.  My style and voice does change depending on the market I am attempting to reach. 

    I write about mainly dog topics.  If my article is targeting the owners of a family pet, then I will be "dumbing down" my information.  No offense to those of you with family dogs. smile  I will explain simple terms (what does socialization mean?) and write as plainly as possible. When I am writing to experienced canine sport competitors, I will use lots of known "jargon" and canine sport "tech speak" as it quickly and succinctly describes what I am trying to say.  I don't want to spend a whole article explaining "decel and accel as turning cues."  I will assume my educated audience already knows that concept (as they should) and just forge ahead.

    I think great writers do make their work accessible to the audience they are trying to reach.  Your voice should change.  Your style should change a bit.  Your jargon should change.

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      I am a sociologist by training, and your example absolutely floored me-love it!  As I read over these replies, I am convinced that shifting one's approach to any audience is critical to writing success.  If I need to "dumb it down," so be it.

  6. Rochelle Frank profile image94
    Rochelle Frankposted 21 months ago

    Hi Lorlie,
    I really don't think about an audience-- which seems like a large faceless group of people waiting to be entertained or informed. If I do think of my readers I think of them as individuals. Maybe I will make a connection with one or a few people-- and my stats often validate this thought.

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Great to see you, Rochelle!  I'm not sure I could see any audience as a group of individuals, since any target audience is, as you pointed out, an amalgam of unknowns.  I do agree that to reach one or two is the goal I would consider successful, but, unlike yours, my stats simply refuse to reflect this.  wink

  7. FatFreddysCat profile image100
    FatFreddysCatposted 21 months ago

    I don't have a particular audience "type" that I'm aiming for. I write for my own amusement first and foremost, and for anybody out there who wants to read about rock & roll and trashy movies.

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Rock&roll and trashy movies sure seem to be your target audience, it seems to me!  wink

      1. FatFreddysCat profile image100
        FatFreddysCatposted 21 months agoin reply to this

        Yeah, I guess so. I just wish it were a bigger audience. big_smile

        1. lorlie6 profile image83
          lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

          I know what you mean!

  8. brainprotips profile image60
    brainprotipsposted 21 months ago

    I used to always write technical, information-heavy articles; then I realized that writing for the laymen is a good idea. It will also help you make your writing more engaging and fun to read. Keep the barrier to entry low!

    1. lorlie6 profile image83
      lorlie6posted 21 months agoin reply to this

      Then you must get my "...group of doctors..." analogy quite well.  The 'average joe' is often the audience a writer hopes to reach, he remains nameless yet can be a great source of fun!

  9. lorlie6 profile image83
    lorlie6posted 21 months ago

    I was checking out various other sites and came up with this: http://writingonewordatatime.com/2015/1 … tic-voice/
    which, it seems to me, sums it up quite swimmingly!
    PS:  I hope this comes up as a link, if not, please forgive my novice understanding of the Internet!  big_smile

 
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