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How technical can one get on Hubpages?

  1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
    TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago

    http://hub.me/alstv

    I have been wanting to write the above article for months, simply because it has changed my life so much. So I'm stuck between not proving what I'm saying and using very technical links and info. I've put it right near the top. I definitely don't want to get rid of it even though it might put off people reading it because it is so technical.

    So, in your opinion, should I swop capsules with the one that says 'what people say' and put that near the top and the technical research at the bottom, or do you think those people who want to read it will read it anyway, and those who don't want to will just skip it and go to the next capsulre.

    Sorry, not normally anal about these things, but I truly feel strongly about this particular hub. I can't believe what a difference the stuff has made to my health!

    1. EricDockett profile image93
      EricDockettposted 11 days ago in reply to this

      My opinion: This is one of those articles that can lead to sites like Healdove getting slammed. I'm sure you know this already, and I think you have some good and bad things going on here.

      The article is about your personal experience, so I would emphasize that. I'd change the title to " . . . Changed My Life" or something rather than ". . . Can Save Your Life". The fact that the product changed your life for the better is very clear in the article, while any hope of the product saving anyone's life is tough to prove and, frankly, raises some red flags.

      I'm not sure I would include Amazon reviewer comments as any kind of expert proof of anything. I'd get rid of that altogether. Nor would I include the YouTube video of the guy who starts out talking about how he screwed up the first video. I think you should stick to your own personal experience, plus the references to the clinical papers. You have enough of that to make a great article. I'm not super familiar with Mercola and what kind of authoritative reputation they have so maybe someone else can comment on that.

      If you are going to include the Amazon product I think this is one case where it must be a text link, and must be the exact brand you recommend with a solid explanation of why you chose that brand. I'm usually pretty liberal-minded when it comes to Amazon, but this is one case where I think you'd be smart to tighten it up.

      Just my opinion. Good luck with it.

      1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
        TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

        Okay, do you think I need to rewrite the article with the correct URL? I can do that. I have put changed my life.

        Okay, will get rid of the one video.

        I can't provide an exact brand because I use a South African brand. I have put a note to say that they will have to sift through it.

        Also removed Amazon comments and put in general comments which can be found all over the web.

        1. EricDockett profile image93
          EricDockettposted 11 days ago in reply to this

          I normally wouldn't worry about the url, but with health topics I'm not sure. My gut says it is probably fine, but who knows.

          Advising readers to sift through Amazon products is no good around here these days, especially for a health-related product. If you can't recommend the exact product you use, I'd leave it out. If editors feel your Hub is good enough to move to a niche site they will likely snip the product anyway, unless you can provide a very specific recommendation.

    2. k@ri profile image81
      k@riposted 10 days ago in reply to this

      I like the way you have it now.  The speaker in the video speaks very slowly with some long pauses.  The information is good, just the speaker makes it hard to get through.  The Amazon product seems good to me, they offer a money back guarantee.  It is cold pressed organic oil, so it is probably the same as what you use.  Good luck with it.  I loved the information and your personal experience. smile

      1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
        TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

        Thank you. smile It really is a stunning product.

    3. Sherry Hewins profile image94
      Sherry Hewinsposted 10 days ago in reply to this

      I liked your article, but I didn't like your links. They spin for a long time, and when they load I don't see anything directly related to what the link phrase said. Also, there are pop ups on them. I would like the article better without the links.

      1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
        TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

        They are linked to research papers. Every single one of those research papers backs what is said.  If they spin for a long time, it has to do with your connection, it doesn't on mine.

        Whenever I link to anything, I try to link to the most academic links I can find. In the case of this article, they are probably are technical/scientific than normal. I did that because I am making incredible claims.

        Google will recognise those links as authentic science and not opinion.

        You have to read through an abstract to get all the data. It is very detailed. I can assure you that every bit of data (and a lot more) that I used is on those links.

  2. theraggededge profile image95
    theraggededgeposted 11 days ago

    Your caption says, "Black Cumin OIl is not related to Cumin from Tumeric..."

    Typos: Oll (oil), tumeric  (turmeric) and it's curcumin in turmeric, not cumin - that's a different spice.

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
      TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

      Thank you. smile Very much appreciated for your input. What about the technical aspects?

      1. theraggededge profile image95
        theraggededgeposted 11 days ago in reply to this

        I think you can get as technical as you like, but for tidiness sake, keep it confined to one capsule. You need plenty of referenced information for this kind of thing, which you have got, but some more information on the plant it comes from, how it is made, etc.

        Also, maybe point out some contraindications - I believe there may be some if taking other medication.

        Thanks for the info - I'd not heard of it, so have been mooching around the web for more. Will probably order a bottle later smile

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
          TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

          Glad to be of help. It really does work.

          Okay, I'll go with the contraindications. I thought I had when I put disadvantages. It's that if one already has low blood pressure, it lowers one's blood pressure even further. It's good for high blood pressure.

          I'm confused about the Amazon product thingie. I very seldom advocate products, but the most money is made by selling products. So what must I do? Advocate a product but not benefit from it because I haven't takent he exact brand?

          Good idea about the plant. I will work on that. smile

          Oh. I put in a product that myf riend uses. He has been using this stuff for a few years and swears by it, so I think that's good.

  3. Marisa Wright profile image95
    Marisa Wrightposted 11 days ago

    I agree that a section on contraindications is essential. I wrote a similar article on D mannose and HubPages insisted I list the contraindications from a health website, even though they've been proved to be incorrect

  4. psycheskinner profile image80
    psycheskinnerposted 11 days ago

    It seems pretty simple to me: you advocate for products you have used and found to be good.

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
      TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

      Indeed. The product is brilliant. However, brand is different to product. In my experience, all brands are more or less the same. I use a brand available in South Africa. That does not mean that brands in America don't work. When there are nearly 4000 reviews on a particular brand saying it is a brilliant product, why on earth does my little bit add any more value. If anything, the more people say something works, the more likely it is. It's when only one person says it that it becomes problematic!

      1. psycheskinner profile image80
        psycheskinnerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

        You can never really tell when brand will be important or not.  I recent replaced my lizard's light bulb with a technically identical bulb.... that killed my lizard.

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
          TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

          I guess you're right about that. So if a product says it's 100% Nigella Sativa oil, would that oil be different to another one that said 100% Nigella Sativa oil? In the end, I used the brand that my friend says is very, very good.

          1. psycheskinner profile image80
            psycheskinnerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

            Companies that sell herbal products are notoriously dishonest.  Amazon is full of scam and counterfeit listings for trendy supplements. A study of protein powders for example, found *most* brands did not test out as matching their claims.  if you are not recommended a specific brand you use, I think you would at least need to specify a third party certification and why it can be trusted, rather than just assume any provider will deliver a safe and effective dose.

            1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
              TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

              Thank you. That is very good advice. smile

  5. TessSchlesinger profile image93
    TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago

    Thanks everybody. It looks and reads much better now. smile All your input much appreciated.

  6. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 11 days ago

    Thanks to G, I've given up on writing anything medical. Doesn't matter whether I posted it here, my website, or anywhere else. Some of those articles were darn good, too. Didn't matter, Google immediately put it on page 10,467 of the search results, and permanently keeps it there. Except in very rare circumstances, unless the article is on a .gov site, that article is dead. I know, totally unfair. Shot in the dark, post it on FB?

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
      TessSchlesingerposted 11 days ago in reply to this

      Wow. I've just had a note saying that it is spammy or there is something wrong with it, and it can't be featured in its current format. That's a first.

      That is definitely not right. It's one thing to say it won't be featured in a niche site. It's quite another to say it won't be featured.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image85
        paradigmsearchposted 10 days ago in reply to this

        Because of G's bias, my guess is HP has become terrified of all things medical. Can't say I blame them. I deleted all medical articles from my website months ago.

      2. Marisa Wright profile image95
        Marisa Wrightposted 10 days ago in reply to this

        Spammy always means they find one or more of your links unacceptable. It's rhat simple. It's probably the Amazon link, for the reason Eric explained

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
          TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

          I wrote to them. They apologized and said it would be featured immediately. At no time whatsoever was the hub spammy.

          Marisa, that said, it is now looking good. I like the way it turned out. Every bit of advice helped. smile

  7. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 10 days ago

    Your thread has got me to thinking maybe I should throw out all my nutrition articles as well. I'll have to work up the energy to check Analytics. If I see any ytd zeros or anything close to it...

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
      TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

      Let me know.

      I'll look for another home for my health articles.

  8. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 10 days ago

    Come to think of it, the grocery store spice rack is the best medicine chest in town.

    Turmeric "spice" - $4 at grocery store
    Turmeric  "herb" - $20 everywhere else

    Cumin "spice" - $4 at grocery story
    Cumin "herb" -  $20 everywhere else

    And the turmeric and cumin spice/herb will actually be the guaranteed real deal at the grocery store.

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
      TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

      Unfortunately none of them have any connection to black cumin oil. This is Nigella sativa. Something very different.

  9. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 10 days ago

    I happen to have both (from the grocery story).

    I bought the cumin by mistake. I bought the turmeric because it has an active ingredient to shrink eye drusens. I shall now try the cumin for the blood pressure and the insomnia.

  10. paradigmsearch profile image85
    paradigmsearchposted 10 days ago

    Cynic that I am, it's all marketing...




    https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/Recall.2014.14722.2-14722%2520PondicherryTable%2520Diagonal%2520LARGE.jpg
    Table - $200


    https://www.cpsc.gov/s3fs-public/Recall.2014.14722.2-14722%2520PondicherryTable%2520Diagonal%2520LARGE.jpg
    Computer Work Station - $500




    Meanwhile, I'll take your word for it that the Nigella sativa has more than cumin active ingredients in it. big_smile

    1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
      TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

      ??? It is a completely different plant. You didn't read the article. It also has several other names.

      1. paradigmsearch profile image85
        paradigmsearchposted 10 days ago in reply to this

        Actually, I read it 3 times. The second 2 times was to try to figure out what the miscommunication was about. I am going to hastily depart.

        1. TessSchlesinger profile image93
          TessSchlesingerposted 10 days ago in reply to this

          Because cumin, tumeric. and black cumin seed are all different plants. Black cumin oil is made from a plant called Nigella sativa. It does not produce either cumin or tumeric.

 
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