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How do you copyright your hub?

  1. Michele Travis profile image70
    Michele Travisposted 5 years ago

    How do you copyright your hub?

    Some hubs have the copyright symbol on them.  How do you go about getting your hub a copyright in order to keep it from being stolen?

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7446430_f260.jpg

  2. profile image0
    JThomp42posted 5 years ago

    Under the law, copyright is granted automatically to the author upon the event of recording a creative work of expression in a tangible form, be it paint on canvas, pixels in a digital camera, or pencil on paper.
    Since 1989 there have been no "formalities" required to obtain copyright -- prior to that the publication may have been required to be registered or marked with a copyright notice (Copyright, date, name of author). Copyright notice is optional today, but may be useful as evidence that an infringement was "willful", which is an element of a criminal copyright indictment.
    © 2012 smile

    1. Michele Travis profile image70
      Michele Travisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      This is a wonderful answer.  Thank you very much.

    2. profile image0
      JThomp42posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You are very welcome Michele.

  3. safiq ali patel profile image73
    safiq ali patelposted 5 years ago

    As far as I understand if you publish a hub here on Hub Pages and your have written and created your hub then the copyright is granted by hub pages as yours and no one other than you owns the copyright to your work.
    To be just a little assertive of your copyright over a your work you can mark the hub with "written by" and then your name. You can also use the international copyright symbol.
    But, overall for the hub pages at least, if you have created the hub, the forum or the question or answers then the copyright of that work remains yours and non-one else. That's the rule here on Hub Pages.

    1. Michele Travis profile image70
      Michele Travisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you,  I appreciate you answer.  It is helping me a lot!

  4. Deborah Brooks profile image78
    Deborah Brooksposted 5 years ago

    Michele.. I was clueless too.. but my editor got my copy write and its what I put at the end of all my hubs.. and I was told the Hub is supposed to copy write it for you.  but if you remember about 8- 9 months ago .. there was so many hubs being stolen.. but a few resourceful hubbers tracked down the person that was stealing our hubs and put them put of business. Great question  MIchele

    1. Michele Travis profile image70
      Michele Travisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks Debbie,  I have seen your hubs all have copyrights.  That is one of the reasons I asked this question:)

  5. rfmoran profile image87
    rfmoranposted 5 years ago

    When you publish something you do own the copyright to it but it's best to put the world on notice by saying: Copyright © 2012 by YOU. The copyright symbol is in MS word - Click insert on top bar then go over to right to symbols. You can file it with the copyright office in DC but it's hardly worth the cost.

    1. geetbhim profile image60
      geetbhimposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      thanks for the information.

  6. mizjo profile image74
    mizjoposted 5 years ago

    No, i have no idea.  I noticed rfmoran's answer, that the symbol is in MS Word.  I wonder if there's an easy html way to do it on a Mac?

    1. Anti-Valentine profile image95
      Anti-Valentineposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Some word processors allow you to type (C) and it automatically converts to a copyright symbol. Otherwise just copy the copyright symbol and paste it. Or is that copyright infringement? tongue

  7. profile image0
    aebruckposted 5 years ago

    I work in the copyright department of a big publishing company so this question is right up my alley!  smile  As soon as your thoughts/words/art is written down in a tangible form (even on a napkin!), they/it is protected by the US copyright law.  Some still choose to include ©2012 (by the way, if you're using a PC the copyright symbol is ALT + 0169) to formally make it known.

    1. Michele Travis profile image70
      Michele Travisposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you so much. That is a wonderful answer!

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