Are you for logic & consistency when it comes to answers?

  1. gmwilliams profile image86
    gmwilliamsposted 13 months ago

    Are you for logic & consistency when it comes to answers?

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  2. tsmog profile image83
    tsmogposted 13 months ago

    It depends on the question's content and context, so sometimes. TMI . . . a Hub could be written to explain when considering those two.

  3. WordCrafter09 profile image78
    WordCrafter09posted 13 months ago

    With regard to consistently using logic, I consistently "consistently use logic" not only on here ("HP's Answers") but in life in general.  In offline life, and with silly little things that don't particularly involve a need to call upon logic, there are times when my reply/reaction to something may appear inconsistent, but that's not just because there was no real need to call upon logic before replying/reacting.  It's also because there's actually a logical reason for what appears to be an inconsistent reply/reaction.  That's only with the minor little things in offline life that I don't see as all that important or worth pondering anyway.  On here, I aim to write replies more carefully.

    There is logic in pretty much everything I do and say (particularly in writing, but even with some of those seemingly insignificant little "careless reactions" that don't involve calling upon logic but are the result of something logical (and therefore easily explainable and that easily clear up any appearance of inconsistency if someone thinks that's what they're seeing).

    Of course, whether it's something like casual online writing or something in a less casual work/employment situation, I just think it should be taken for granted that someone's replies/information be something that can easily be backed up with logic (or at least a logical explanation).

    With the exception of information/views we share with our children as they're growing up (which I think require every bit as much logic, objectivity, and broad and solid information/perspective), there's not really any reason (usually) that we should have to worry about explaining what we say or do to any other adults (unless, of course, we logically and objectively really do owe them an explanation for some specific reason).

    Here's where I am tempted to say that I consistently "consistently use logic" and if someone else doesn't understand the logic I've used a) all anyone has to do is ask and/or b) that's they're problem and not mine.  It seems to have turned out (I've noticed), however, that when someone else doesn't understand one's logic and/or see any connection between logic and apparent inconsistency, it can far too easily turn into MY problem

 
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