Could you share with me how to strike a balance in writing

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  1. threekeys profile image74
    threekeysposted 5 months ago

    a potential memoir where I dont write exclusively about the challenges/negatives and yet not coming across like a potential naive Pollyanna? Very grateful for your thoughts

    1. kenneth avery profile image81
      kenneth averyposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      smile threekeys -- I humbly suggest that you inject a mild dose of humor to accompany your thought(s) and do it moderately.

      1. threekeys profile image74
        threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

        I just dont do humour. I have no idea how to write humour. Dont get me wrong. I do have a sense of humour but I ve been somewhat too serious for too long.
        Its a great idea and I thankyou for offering it Kenneth.

        1. Rochelle Frank profile image96
          Rochelle Frankposted 5 months agoin reply to this

          Don't be afraid of humor...most people appreciate it greatly in appropriate circumstances and it can be a great asset.  (Sometimes you have to actually tell people that your comment is meant humorously.)
          I have a hub on how to write humor.. though it might not apply to everyone.

          1. threekeys profile image74
            threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

            I would like to read that hub Rochelle. May I have its connecting url?

            1. Rochelle Frank profile image96
              Rochelle Frankposted 5 months agoin reply to this
              1. threekeys profile image74
                threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

                Cheers Rochelle:)

          2. kenneth avery profile image81
            kenneth averyposted 5 months agoin reply to this

            @Rochelle -- Amen.

  2. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image96
    Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 months ago

    The single most important thing is to have a topic people are looking for, and the only way to have that title and make it work is to answer the questions persons looking for such answers may have. So you need a title and content which gives the answers to the questions the title implies the page should provide.

    After that, you need proper spelling and grammar. In fact, none of the above matters if people can't make heads nor tails of your text.

    Now this is the part that is most significant to me. It took me a bit to figure this part out. You're page needs to be completely pleasing aesthetically. What dafuq am I talking about?

    Listen, big chunks of text just piss readers off. You get lost trying to read, your head moves a bit, and you have lost your place. It is up to YOU to solve this problem, and the way to do it is to divide your text into small readable chunks.

    I'm doing my damndest to provide an example of what I'm saying in this bit of message. After about this much text you should provide a photo. When you can use a  very very very VERY appropriate video, yeah, you should do that to break up text too.

    1. threekeys profile image74
      threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      So...are you saying "how to "styled writings is the way to go? Even in the way of a memoir?
      I know I am guilty of putting a little more text in a capsule than I should. I let my impatience to "get it done"override the clarity and space the reader desires.
      Im guilty of needless typos in my text. Got to slow down.
      Many helpful practical tips, Wesman.Cheers.

  3. threekeys profile image74
    threekeysposted 5 months ago

    Found her. Cheers Kenneth:)

  4. Marisa Wright profile image98
    Marisa Wrightposted 5 months ago

    I think the question you have to ask yourself is, why would a complete stranger want to read this memoir?  What would attract them to the story? 

    That's where Wesman's idea comes in.  You will get a LOT more readers if you can write your story with the objective of helping others going through the same experience you did.   

    As for your comment about putting too much in a text capsule and forgetting about clarity - that's what editing is for.   I've heard it said that really good creative writers spend more time editing a piece than writing it in the first place.

    1. threekeys profile image74
      threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      Really appreciate your feedback Marissa. I have taken note.

    2. DanielJOwens profile image93
      DanielJOwensposted 5 months agoin reply to this

      "I've heard it said that really good creative writers spend more time editing a piece than writing it in the first place."

      That sentence brings about a lot of freedom.  Thank You.

      1. threekeys profile image74
        threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

        Editing would give us a second chance and that would give us creative leeway, which is fantastic. However, in saying that, there is a part of me, especially when it comes to creating poetry, that I don't really like to edit it. Because it means you are deleting your meaning. Who is to say whether the the first isn't your best version of that moment captured? Humans are not perfect so how could we presume to "get it right" in our writings with each edit? Do you know what I mean?
        All said and done, I understand what you mean. Many thanks for your feedback (smile)

        1. Marisa Wright profile image98
          Marisa Wrightposted 5 months agoin reply to this

          I disagree.  Editing does not destroy meaning.  It's like the difference between a diamond as it's dug out of the ground, and a diamond that has been polished to display its brilliance.

          I've heard people talk about "letting their creativity flow on to the page" and not spoiling it by something so prosaic as editing.   That may be true for poetry for all I know - I'm not a poet.  However, for prose creative writing, it definitely is not. 

          If your only goal is to express yourself, then letting the words flow on to the page is fine.  It means something to you, so that's OK.    However, if you want to communicate with your readers, then it isn't. Too often, letting the words flow just ends up as verbal diarrhoea!  As you said yourself, the reader wants clarity and space, and they don't want to be distracted by typos and punctuation mistakes either.

          In the article below, the author is talking about a professional editor and he describes the editor as "the reader's advocate".  I like that description.  When you write, you're writing to express yourself - but when you edit, you're trying to look at the piece from the reader's point of view.



          http://www.self-pub.net/blog/the-importance-of-editing/

          1. threekeys profile image74
            threekeysposted 5 months agoin reply to this

            No, no one wants a verbal display of rubbish to plough through.
            The analogy of creating a beautiful diamond from a  lump of coal, I understand, Marissa.

 
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