Quote of the Day - Virginia Woolf

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  1. Kenna McHugh profile image90
    Kenna McHughposted 14 months ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/14244108_f1024.jpg
    “Writing is like sex. First, you do it for love, then you do it for your friends, and then you do it for money.”
    ― Virginia Woolf

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
      Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

      Really? But I think sex is a much stronger word. Why not substitute sex for food? No man can make love to himself. A man can make love to his many females friends. What then is the use of making love for money, when alternate and lucrative ventures exist?

      There are many other ways to rebuttal the saying. The mind certainly can be dynamic in handling the challenge. Thank you.

  2. theraggededge profile image98
    theraggededgeposted 14 months ago

    Mibakagh, it's a quotation from the (dead) writer, Virginia Woolfe. It is what it is. An analogy. Probably meant to be funny.

    And there's no need to use profanity in this forum.

  3. Miebakagh57 profile image40
    Miebakagh57posted 14 months ago

    Hello, theraggededge, however, funny it the quote seems, some like me had not realized it be taken in a funny manner. It can sound seriously likewise. The dead author Virginia Wolf is not here to tell us that she is not serious with her statement either.
    Be that as it may, I know when to see funny things my way. I know too how to take funny things my way.

    We here on HubPages are taught, or rather told not to write for money but for our larger audience, right? But the money will come some days. Some authors are already earning monthly. Others are getting listed, and getting just a little of the dollar. Whatever, the attitude will take to writing let's stick with it.

    Profanity? Okay, I am sorry. I thought the language I used should be taken as normal. But why is that, the words, rape, sexual abuse, birth control, and so on as recently used in the forum this week was not tag profane? Good day, and thank you.

  4. theraggededge profile image98
    theraggededgeposted 14 months ago

    Because those example words are fine. They are not profane. Your use of the F-word is not fine. While I don't get offended by such things, there are forum members who won't expect to see it used here.

    I don't really understand your claim that we are not told to write for money. In the beginning, it's best not to worry about it while the new writer builds up a collection of well-written articles. From there, they can see what works for them and what doesn't.

    So, to take Virginia Woolf's analogy and apply it to HubPages:

    1. Write for the love of writing.
    2. Write for friends (visitors).
    3. Write to build on what you have learned in order to be paid for it.

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
      Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

      Hey, theraggedge, my friend, thank you. I should have explained it that way too, but I want to be a little creative. That is all. You are welcomed as I used to comment. Have a nice day.

    2. Kenna McHugh profile image90
      Kenna McHughposted 14 months agoin reply to this

      Bev and Miebakagh,

      Bev perfectly explains the wit of Virginia Woolf's quote. She was part of a group of friends - Bloomsbury Group - intellectual writers and artists.

      Speculatively, witticisms were part of their expressions in order to show their feelings and opinions. Similar to HP forums, they shared their feelings and opinions as well as helped each other with their craft.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
        Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

        Hello, Kenna, got it. Be that as it seems, I and others were not part of that inner group. And so, our expressions whether creatively or intellectually, would seem to differ, right? We all interpreted things from different angles. We composed our thoughts differently. Take an example like to write "A travel to the Virgin Islands." We all write the same story with a different experience. Thank you, and enjoy the day.

        1. theraggededge profile image98
          theraggededgeposted 14 months agoin reply to this

          No, you wouldn't be. It doesn't exist any more. Google 'Bloomsbury Group' to find out more. It's fascinating.

          And of course your expressions are going to differ. Virginia Woolf was a female English writer born in 1882.

          The quote is an example of British humour, using an extreme comparison to explain a complex point in a simple way. It's not about sex vs writing. And it's not meant to be taken literally. It would have been quite shocking back in the day when she said or wrote it.

          When you read "Something is like something.... " it's called a 'simile', a helpful, interesting, memorable, or funny comparison.

          1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
            Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

            Hey, theraggedege, "extreme comparison to explain a complex point"? Interesting! The British are extremely unique, and masters in literature, English, and the arts. But this is not what they (the Brits) told me about simile.

            We the third world English speakers or learners have still the way to go 'Virginia Wolf.' But agreed that our expressions may differ, the discussion to me seems also a fascinating lesson. Welcome, and thank you.

            1. theraggededge profile image98
              theraggededgeposted 14 months agoin reply to this

              Now you've confused two separate paragraphs. I didn't say that a simile is an extreme comparison to explain a complex point, did I?  It can be, as illustrated by the quote, but that's not the definition of a simile. That's why I put into another paragraph.

              1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
                Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

                My friend, theraggededge, either did I say or mean a simile is "extreme comparison to explain a complex point"?. I was referring to Virginia Wolf's quote and nothing else. I did not take it neither that you mean a simile is an extreme comparison to explain a complex point. But like as you said that it can be, that is noted. You are always welcomed. And, thank you. Hope you enjoy the day? I do.

        2. Kenna McHugh profile image90
          Kenna McHughposted 14 months agoin reply to this

          Miebakagh, Yes. Everyone is different, and their stories account for that. Police officers will tell you that when they get witness statements to a crime on the street. Each witness has a different take on what happened.

          Woolf had an interesting life for a woman at the turn of the century. Though it was a troubled life, she was extremely literate. It shows in her wit.

  5. janshares profile image95
    jansharesposted 14 months ago

    big_smile yikes big_smile Hilarious!

  6. erorantes profile image60
    erorantesposted 14 months ago

    Good morning miss Kenna Mchug. I am still doing it for love , and the rest come alone. I wish you a wonderful day.  Also, I wish you stay in love with your writing and pictures posting. I love it. Thank you.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image90
      Kenna McHughposted 14 months agoin reply to this

      erorantes, Thank you for the comment. I enjoy sharing quotes with pictures. I will not stop. smile

  7. Will Apse profile image90
    Will Apseposted 14 months ago

    No one who has read Woolf or knows anything about her life would believe that quotation is real.

    The pic chosen by the OP is the most pertinent comment.

  8. Miebakagh57 profile image40
    Miebakagh57posted 14 months ago

    Really? Then, are all the discussions going on in the forum interesting, fascinating and ...real?

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image90
      Kenna McHughposted 14 months agoin reply to this

      Woolf lived and wrote during a time when literacy was much higher than it is today. People read books. There was no television, and radio was on the airwaves. Her work continues to be read and liked because she wrote in prose that people understood and agreed with and that made it real.

      1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
        Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

        I like what Francis Bacon once wrote: "Reading makes a full man...writing an exact man." Today, we don't have a high reading culture. Today, we have lost the writing culture. Technology has taken all that away. But some persons are not swayed. They insisted on the good old ways.

        Many have lost the fine art of handwriting in preference to hitting the "keyboard" on computers and smartphones. I love handwriting, especially when cursive and calligraphic. Nothing fascinates me than a fine traditional handwriting. Handwriting is now a lost art.

        Recently, I was commenting on such an issue. A writer told me that her husband thinks a writing was made by four different persons or it was forged. She explains that for this reason, she types the shopping list to her man otherwise, he will not bring the right foodstuffs.

        I have two bottles of black and blue with two fountain pens for each ink. In addition, I stock collections of fountain pens. Recently, my first daughter asks me to lend her a pen and I gave out one as a gift.

        Moreso, I usually write on paper before hitting the keyboard to load my stories on HubPages.

        In conclusion, modern men have lost the reading and writing culture these days. Thank you for your time.

  9. Kenna McHugh profile image90
    Kenna McHughposted 14 months ago

    Sir Francis Bacon is one of my favorite historical figures. His scientific methods revolutionized science.

    1. Miebakagh57 profile image40
      Miebakagh57posted 14 months agoin reply to this

      I appreciated that. You are welcomed.  And thank you.

  10. Erudite Scholar profile image62
    Erudite Scholarposted 14 months ago

    I like the metaphor.Nice and Apt.

 
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