Deleting Low-Performing Articles

Jump to Last Post 1-9 of 9 discussions (47 posts)
  1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
    Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks ago

    Some of us have mentioned deleting low-performing articles from your Hubs. I sense they do it because it increases views/impressions. How does that increase views/impressions?

    1. paradigmsearch profile image90
      paradigmsearchposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      If you mean on the remaining hubs, as far as I know it doesn't. However when I have a hub over 3 years old and it's still collecting dust, I move it for a new life elsewhere.

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
        Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        If you have another place for the article, I can see moving it. But, deleting it?

        1. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image97
          Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          I always put them on Blogger. I have some there which I plan to look over, and then re-write for here. They were up to my standards 6 or more years ago, but my current standards are much higher.

          1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
            Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            Wesman,

            That's a good idea. I might try moving some of my low-performing articles to another website and see what happens.

    2. Wesman Todd Shaw profile image97
      Wesman Todd Shawposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      Easy - it doesn't.

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
        Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        Good point.

    3. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
      TIMETRAVELER2posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      It doesn't.  However to retain views, I sometimes delete the contents and replace them with text from a new hub that deals with the same general topic.

    4. jwashington profile image70
      jwashingtonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      I was thinking of doing this when I have enough hubs. One benefit I see is tailoring your hubs to one or two niches. So, if someone wanted to read, say, about Epilepsy and topics around it, they may come back to the same profile as a reference (for example, like the subsites on HubPages).

      Instead of the same topic, it could be the same genre. So, if your niche is health, than whomever wants to read about health can refer back to your profile.

      It could be counterproductive too; unless your hubs are so different under one genre updated often, deleting hubs for one niche may be less benefitial.

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
        Kenna McHughposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        J,
        Good points. My Hubs are different, but some follow a similar category. I just can't delete my articles.

        1. jwashington profile image70
          jwashingtonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          Yeah. I haven't written much so I'm still getting a feel if I want to put the effort into writing more.

          1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
            Kenna McHughposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            J,
            Your topics are unique but relevant, which is good. You are on the right track.  It takes time and effort.

        2. TIMETRAVELER2 profile image97
          TIMETRAVELER2posted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          If you decide to delete, low views should not be the reason.  You should only delete if you discover, as I have from time to time, that your article duplicates another one that you have written, has too much online competition and has no chance of getting good views or has writing flaws that are so bad that they cannot be corrected.  There are reasons for low views but if you don't know what they are, you may be deleting a piece of work that can be upgraded and improved to the point that it will be moved to niche sites where it can have a chance of getting views and earnings.

    5. jwashington profile image70
      jwashingtonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Let me ask. When you write articles, do you have a sense of what types of hubs you can write and be qualified for or is it luck?

      I know I'm thinking of deleting articles on the basis I don't know what to edit; and, they'd serve no purpose just siting on my profile.

      1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
        Kenna McHughposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        J,
        I operate with a purpose, and then I angle my articles toward that purpose. I check SEO, google it to see the probability of success.

        In the beginning, I joined HP to write about film industry careers. That was eleven years ago. Those articles are still up. Some are in niche sites, and some are not. I wrote about film careers because I am passionate about film and work in the industry.

        I am also passionate about other things like helping people and getting spreading the truth or educating others.  If I can inspire someone to live a better life and be happier, that is worth more than a 6 figured passive income.

        1. jwashington profile image70
          jwashingtonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

          Oh! That makes sense. In regards to your original question about deletion, maybe set aside those that are not in your career focus?

          The non-related articles, how are they contributing to your specialty and career focus? Are they creating revenue?

          Another question is are your articles evergreens (new term in my Rolodex) or are they out of date?

          If HubPages had a folders to separate our Hubs, that would be great. I know I wouldn't want to delete my articles either. It also depends on your goals to and how much what you have may or may not be benefiting you in the long run.

          Your post gave me better context of your question.

          1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
            Kenna McHughposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

            J,
            I am fortunate because I've studied in many fields. All my articles relate to personal experience and are evergreen. They contribute to my revenue.

  2. DrMark1961 profile image96
    DrMark1961posted 5 weeks ago

    Many people will tell you that if you publish on this site, or on one of the niche sites, Google cannot tell who you are and will look at all of the content on the site as exactly the same.
    I do not believe that. Is Google really so stupid that they cannot tell certain HP authors apart?
    If you have 50 articles, and 25 are on the first page and have good traffic, and the other 25 are relegated to page 47 and rarely have page views, should you do something about it? I did. I deleted the poor performing articles.
    Did I see an upturn in the other articles? Definitely. Can I prove that the increased traffic was not due to time or some other factor? No. Anytime you do something to your articles other things are happening at the same time.
    Do I have great traffic? Yes, at least as far as the others who have discussed their traffic on the forums. Do I think that it is because I eliminated some of the very poor performing articles from my page? Yes, I do.
    Do you have to believe that this will work? Not at all.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
      Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      Dr. Mark,
      I agree. Google is aware of the content. They have an A-List.
      I am curious: How many articles you deleted?  Did you delete them over time? All at once?

      1. DrMark1961 profile image96
        DrMark1961posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        I have not kept count, but I think about 50. I have not done this in a while, since for the last few years I have only been publishing about once a month and write longer articles that I hope are more thoroughly researched and will eventually gain more traffic.
        No, I did not delete them all at once. I had some Brazilian recipes and I deleted them after about a year, and then after that deleted the articles on epilepsy (in humans) and on religion.

    2. sirama profile image94
      siramaposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      How much time google takes to remove the index of deleted articles? Because one can't publish it on other site as it can be seen as duplicate..

    3. EsmeSanBona profile image98
      EsmeSanBonaposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

      Thanks, DrMark!  That's the best analysis I've seen yet.

  3. psycheskinner profile image85
    psycheskinnerposted 5 weeks ago

    I few year ago I tried that.  No matter how little an article made on Hubpages, on Blogger it made less.  So now I leave them.

    I don't think hubs affect each other for each contributor.  They are pages on the site they are on and counted as part of that enormous multi-author whole.  Ergo having a lower traffic hub has zero effect on your high traffic hubs.

    If Hubstaff say different I will believe them but until then I am happy with my strategy.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
      Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      Good points, psyche. You tried it and know what works.

  4. ReViewMeMedia profile image91
    ReViewMeMediaposted 5 weeks ago

    I never delete anything, I just link it to get more traffic even if the article is old.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
      Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      Re, I link articles, too. Thanks for the input.
      On another topic, What did you think of Alita: Battle Angel?

      1. ReViewMeMedia profile image91
        ReViewMeMediaposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        I have not gone to watch it, but I will be buying it on blu-ray to watch and review it.

  5. Will Apse profile image90
    Will Apseposted 5 weeks ago

    If pages are performing badly because they are triggering search engine spam filters they should be demoted from niche sites.

    I doubt if that is the case with many pages on HP but it is hard to be sure. Basically, if a page gets no traffic, HP will dump it eventually without our intervention.

    1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
      Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

      Will,
      You mean they will dump the article from the niche site and not HP in general, right?

      1. lobobrandon profile image89
        lobobrandonposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        Yup, that's how it works. I wonder whether they move new articles that are deemed worthy but never get any traffic back to HP? Any idea if this is done?

        1. Will Apse profile image90
          Will Apseposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          It has never happened to me. But that is official policy. Or it was last time I heard. I think a new article on a niche gets a year to attract regular traffic from search engines, or it is demoted.

          Presumably, it gets unfeatured at the same time since hubpages. com pages are unfeatured for lack of traffic.

          Not sure what you don't trust about Google pronouncements, by the way. They will not tell you much (or anything) about their algos but they will tell you what kinds of page they want to serve up in search results and that is worth listening to.

          1. lobobrandon profile image89
            lobobrandonposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            I didn't say they give out wrong info. They won't and they can't. It would take away from their credibility. I don't trust that they are telling us everything they are working on.

    2. Beth Eaglescliffe profile image96
      Beth Eaglescliffeposted 5 weeks ago

      My experience is similar to that of DrMark. I deleted more than half the articles I had published. (I had more than 120 hubs and now have fewer than 60). All were on niche sites but they were getting almost zero views. Since doing this my total impressions have increased and my monthly earnings have improved dramatically. Why? I don't know. Would I recommend doing this? Absolutely!

      Here's my way of making income grow on HP.
      1. Make sure every article is moved to a niche site. If something doesn't pass QA after three tries, delete. Having something sitting around on the old HubPages site is a waste of time (in my opinion) as it doesn't earn anything.
      2. Once on a niche site, I update every article at least once every three months. This could be a new image, a new sentence, or just a rearrangement of the capsules. (This is where it helps to have fewer articles.)
      3. If a niche site article is still failing to get traffic after 12 months (including updating it every 3 months) then delete.
      4. All comments are moderated by me before being published. Anything that doesn't add to the article is deleted. Anything spammy is deleted. If the information is really useful I add a new paragraph to my article and include it.

      Writing on HP does not provide a truly passive income. You need to keep updating and refreshing articles to make them work for you.

    3. lobobrandon profile image89
      lobobrandonposted 5 weeks ago

      I disagree with what Dr. Mark says in his first reply to this thread. Google does not have the ability to link the work of authors. It did try this using the rel publisher tag, but that was a failure. They will try to do this again in the future, but for now, it's all domain based. The same article on website A will be on page 10, but moved to website B it can be the #1 article and have the snippet too. All this while very obviously being written by the same author.

      I did at once have 50 or so hubs, I deleted most because back then they were subdomains. This did have an effect as each domain was treated separately. But, now that the work moves to niche sites, there's no point doing this. Did I see an improvement after deleting those pages? Not really. But I did and continue to have amazing traffic after the niche sites. It took me 7 years to get to a million views and 8 months later I am already at 1.5 Million. No hubs were deleted, I still have a few that get 0 views a day and 7 views a month.

      But, instead of deleting those, I work on the ones that are doing well and make sure that I get the #1 spot for the different keywords they already rank for. Deleting some of then non-performers will not increase my traffic, because to do that I need to get to a position above position one on some of my articles, which is not possible. If Google said my content was no good due to the few not getting traffic, I would not have the #1 spot on the rest of if they did, in fact, keep track, the other ones that are doing bad would be doing a lot better.

      My hub on whether the tomato is a fruit or a vegetable is one of my best-written hubs and it's one of my lower trafficked hubs at no more than 20 views a day on average because it is on Owlcation and not Degnarden. The domain and not the author is important. Owlcation is still a lot better than HP.

      1. DrMark1961 profile image96
        DrMark1961posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

        1. Have you considered that Google knows you as lobobrandon on the Dengarden site but does not treat you the same on the Owlcation site.
        2. You deleted a lot of articles and are doing a lot better. You attribute that change to the niche sites. You can not be sure of this, as things improved later. Maybe they were going to improve anyway because you deleted some articles.
        3. You mention that Google does not have the ability to link the works of authors. Since we are not Google employees, and do not write the programs that determine how things work, your comments are only based on what you have read. In the past, Google has not always been 100% honest. Are you positive that they are being 100% honest about not having this ability at this time?

        1. lobobrandon profile image89
          lobobrandonposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

          1. That goes against what you're proposing, right? If they cannot detect that it is from the same author across two websites that are coded exactly the same, they can definitely not track authors across websites built on different platforms. Also, not all my Dengarden articles do well right off the block. A lot of additional work needs to go into them. I'm pretty sure not all of your articles do as well as your top articles. There will be some on PetHelfpul that are not ranking in the top 3 even though most of yours are.
          2. Definitely not, because there was like 2 years and then the niche sites and the jump.
          3. I do SEO professionally so I don't trust a word Google says, it's all testing. And tests do reveal what the algorithm does. Algorithms change and new tests would be necessary, but as of a few months ago, authors don't matter, domains do.

          1. DrMark1961 profile image96
            DrMark1961posted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

            I really enjoyed that line " I do SEO professionally so I don't trust a word Google says".
            I like your replies, but still disagree. I think it would be interesting if someone joined a site like Squidoo (I know but I could not think of another), used the author name lobobrandon, then published a really crappy spam filled article on range hoods. You could see then if your HP traffic was negatively affected, or not affected at all.

            1. lobobrandon profile image89
              lobobrandonposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

              Yes, I've tested the move of the same content across domains with the same author names and the rankings was a lot different. We can agree to disagree. But yes, never trust Google on what they say about their algorithms. If you want real info, track their patents and read them to know what they are actually working on.

              I do have some really bad crappy articles under the name lobobrandon on Wizzley smile Does not affect me here.

              Google would never spend so much time making an algorithm for this because the vast majority of the internet functions as webpages and not articles by authors. Those pages do not have author profiles and names. Many do have contributor pages but not in the way we have them here, a profile on the side of each article.

              1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
                Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                Dr. Mark and Brandon,
                Great banter, it's helpful because getting high rankings and revenue takes work. Being successful with HP is more than just being a professional writer.
                You need to know SEO with your ear to the changes of Google.

                1. lobobrandon profile image89
                  lobobrandonposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                  True, also on a side note there seems to have been a big update over the last 24 hours. Most likely the medical sites that have been the target.

                  1. Kenna McHugh profile image87
                    Kenna McHughposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                    Brandon, Google or HP updates?

                    1. lobobrandon profile image89
                      lobobrandonposted 5 weeks agoin reply to this

                      Google.

    4. Will Apse profile image90
      Will Apseposted 5 weeks ago

      Google did once try to work on a way of recognising individual authors and ranking their trustworthiness/merit, but quickly gave up.

      https://searchengineland.com/goodbye-go … hip-201975

      Some people still think it matters. Not sure why, given that no one can use the webmaster tools bit anymore.

      1. lobobrandon profile image89
        lobobrandonposted 4 weeks agoin reply to this

        Yes, I already pointed this out in my first reply to this thread. But it's code that goes on all your pages and has nothing to do with webmaster tools. It was to do with your G+ profile.

    5. Kenna McHugh profile image87
      Kenna McHughposted 4 weeks ago

      And, G+ is no longer around.

     
    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)