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Bones found on island might be Amelia Earhart's

  1. Stacie L profile image88
    Stacie Lposted 7 years ago

    Bones found on island might be Amelia Earhart's
    AP


        * Bones may be those of Amelia Earhart Slideshow:Bones may be those of Amelia Earhart

    By SEAN MURPHY, Associated Press Sean Murphy, Associated Press – Sat Dec 18, 12:47 am ET

    NORMAN, Okla. – The three bone fragments turned up on a deserted South Pacific island that lay along the course Amelia Earhart was following when she vanished. Nearby were several tantalizing artifacts: some old makeup, some glass bottles and shells that had been cut open.

    Now scientists at the University of Oklahoma hope to extract DNA from the tiny bone chips in tests that could prove Earhart died as a castaway after failing in her 1937 quest to become the first woman to fly around the world.

    "There's no guarantee," said Ric Gillespie, director of the International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, a group of aviation enthusiasts in Delaware that found the pieces of bone this year while on an expedition to Nikumaroro Island, about 1,800 miles south of Hawaii.

    "You only have to say you have a bone that may be human and may be linked to Earhart and people get excited. But it is true that, if they can get DNA, and if they can match it to Amelia Earhart's DNA, that's pretty good."

    It could be months before scientists know for sure — and it could turn out the bones are from a turtle. The fragments were found near a hollowed-out turtle shell that might have been used to collect rain water, but there were no other turtle parts nearby.

    Earhart's disappearance on July 2, 1937, remains one of the 20th century's most enduring mysteries. Did she run out of fuel and crash at sea? Did her Lockheed Electra develop engine trouble? Did she spot the island from the sky and attempt to land on a nearby reef?
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101218/ap_ … for_amelia

  2. rotl profile image59
    rotlposted 7 years ago

    Seems like people find things that could belong to Amelia Earhart every few years but it never pans out. Maybe they are on to something this time, but I doubt it.

    I think for the world, having her disappearance be a mystery makes her even more fascinating. However, I'm sure her family would benefit from getting some closure.

 
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