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jump to last post 1-5 of 5 discussions (5 posts)

What type of fish is Pollock and where does it come from?

  1. fortunerep profile image82
    fortunerepposted 9 years ago

    What type of fish is Pollock and where does it come from?

  2. RGraf profile image93
    RGrafposted 8 years ago

    The pollock fish is a popular one for the table and the sports fisherman. (I'm sorry that you thought this was about people from Poland, but that is spelled Polak.) Depending on where you hail from, you might call the pollock a pollack, saithe, coley, or Boston blues. But no matter the location the pollock holds its own. read more

  3. profile image43
    masummiahposted 8 years ago

    Pollock is one of the more deep bodied members of the cod family.  This species lacks the dark lateral blotch and pale gray to yellow laterally.  The belly is silvery.  Pollock range from olive green to brownish green dorsally and pale gray to yellow laterally.  Young pollock are darker and yellower on the lower sides than are older, larger pollock.  The largest pollock landed by hook and line in Massachusetts weighed 44 pounds 7 ounces and was caught at Cashes Ledge.  Pollock grow about 5 inches a year for the first 3 years of life, 2 to 4 inches a year for the next 3 years and about 1 to 2 inches a year thereafter.  A 5 year old pollock may weigh 4 to 5 pounds and measure up to 25 inches in length and a 9 year old 8 to 10 pounds and 30 inches in length.  The maximum age reached by pollock is about 19 years.

  4. codebreakers57 profile image68
    codebreakers57posted 8 years ago

    Pollock (or pollack, pronounced the same and listed first in most UK and US dictionaries) is the common name used for either of the two species of marine fish in the Pollachius genus.the two species are P. pollachius also know as Atlantic pollock, European pollock, lieu jaune, lythe, and pollock;  and P. virens which is sometimes known as Boston blues (distinct from bluefish), coalfish (or coley) or saithe.

    both species can grow up to 3ft 6 in and it has a very strongly defined lateral line. it can be found in water up to 180m deep under rocks. it is also used in the uk as an alternative to cod and haddock. it has also become very popular due to the overfishing of cod and haddock.

  5. jstevens11 profile image53
    jstevens11posted 8 years ago

    Pollock (or pollack, pronounced the same and listed first in most UK and US dictionaries) is the common name used for either of the two species of marine fish in the Pollachius genus. Both P. pollachius and P. virens are commonly referred to as pollock. Other names for P. pollachius include the Atlantic pollock, European pollock, lieu jaune, lythe, and pollock; while P. virens is sometimes known as Boston blues (distinct from bluefish), coalfish (or coley) or saithe.

    Both species can grow to 3 ft 6 in (1.07 m) and can weigh up to 46 lb (21 kg). The fish has a strongly-defined silvery lateral line running down the sides. Above the lateral line the color is a greenish black. The belly is white. It can be found in water up to 100 fathoms (180 m) deep over rocks, and anywhere in the water column. They have a range from North Carolina up to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Pollock are a "white fish". They are an important part of the New England and North Atlantic fisheries, though less so than cod and haddock. They spawn in late winter and early spring on Georges Bank, off the New England coast

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