This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-6 of 6 discussions (6 posts)

Do you think it is better to home school children or to allow them to attend pub

  1. amberjones21 profile image57
    amberjones21posted 7 years ago

    Do you think it is better to home school children or to allow them to attend public school?

    My sister is home schooling her daughter. I think it's a great option for parents who can do it but I think it could have some drawbacks on her daughter's social development.

  2. eilander1542011 profile image60
    eilander1542011posted 7 years ago

    This has been a hot topic in my life of late. My girlfriend and I have discussed the options over countless nights and we've come to a solid conclusion...for us at least.
    As we all know the biggest drawback to homeschooling as amberjones21 stated is the lack of social development the child will receive. School provides a place of social interaction for our children among their peers, so it is not right to take this from them. On the other hand, I know that the major reason for parents homeschooling their children in the first place is the fact that our school systems are terrible. Each and every year American schools fall in every category that they should rise in. So now people are taking action.
    My solution is this. Up unto about sixth grade or so, our schools are OK. The teachers love what they do, and they love their students. But the biggest reason is the curriculum itself. Our children are only learning the basics in math, reading, writing, arts, cience and the like. The basics are good to know if you want to be able to function successfully in society.
    Upon their entrance into junior high and high school the curriculum is shot to shit. They are no longer learning anything useful, and they begin to hate school. It is at this point that I would pull my child out of school and begin their homeschooling. They have had years of social development when it was most important for them to have it. Now they are ready to learn about life from their parents. They can understand many subjects and begin to discuss them intelligently. It is this time that parents are most needed in their child's development. That rebellious stage is when parents need to be closest to their children as much as possible and this solution allows that.
    I hope some day we can fix our failing school system so that such matters may become moot. But until then I believe a combination of public school and home school is out best option.

  3. CollegePrepU profile image58
    CollegePrepUposted 7 years ago

    Not all school systems in the United States are "failing" or "shot to $hit"  Unfortunately, the quality of a school system correlates largely to the socio-economic area you live in.  Sad, but it's the truth.
    In that respect, yes I believe that the inner-city and/or low socio-economic school districts need help.  But "help" in this case means money, and as we know, America has put education on the backburner with regard to monetary aid.
    If you decide to homeschool your child, more power to you.  That kind of freedom is what this country is founded upon.  Much like anything in life, every situation is different and unique.  If you as a parent feel that your child will benefit more from homeschooled instruction, then that is the way to go.

  4. wychic profile image88
    wychicposted 7 years ago

    It depends on who you are, what resources are available in the community, and to what extent parents are willing to go to give their children a well-rounded education. The stereotype of "antisocial homeschoolers" is a pretty silly one, as far as I'm concerned, and is only true in people who don't differentiate between homeSCHOOL and simply sticking a book in front of their kids' faces. For me, homeschooling was better by far in every aspect, and having to go to public school only limited my social interactions and learning opportunities. If a parent doesn't have the time, energy, and inclination to really devote to investing in their kids, then do them a favor and leave their education to someone else...but if it's something they're really willing to devote themselves to, it can be the best thing a parent ever did for their kids. I wrote a lot more details about my experiences in my hubs, as well as a much more detailed answer to this particular question:

    http://hubpages.com/hub/A-Homeschoolers-Tale

    http://hubpages.com/hub/Homeschooling-B … nd-Rewards

    http://hubpages.com/hub/What-to-Conside … Homeschool

    And yes, I do intend to homeschool my own kids too smile.

  5. amberjones21 profile image57
    amberjones21posted 7 years ago

    I appreciate all of your answers. And wychic, I didn't mean that every home schooled child will be anti-social or suffer from being home schooled. I agree that it can be the best thing a parent can do for their child, if they can do it. But my sister tends to shelter her daughter very much and she doesn't get out much. It's nice to see varying opinions on this topic. Thanks everyone.

  6. profile image0
    gobanglaposted 7 years ago

    I would say better to homeschool because even our best students are years behind their peers in other countries. In a globalized world, our kids can no longer afford to be behind.

    But when you homeschool, you have to go out of your way to socialize your child. It's easy to do but it isn't good for your niece if you sister isn't actively getting her out among other kids.

 
working