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Do you feel that homeschooled children generally miss out on socialization?

  1. arizonataylor profile image81
    arizonataylorposted 5 years ago

    Do you feel that homeschooled children generally miss out on socialization?

  2. SPK5367 profile image68
    SPK5367posted 5 years ago

    This is a common question...and one of the first concerns raised by many who aren't too sure that homeschooling is a "legitimate" option.  The answer is simple -no.

    There are pros and cons to every educational option that parents consider for their children, but socialization doesn't belong within a mile of the "con" list for the choice to homeschool.  After 13 years of homeschooling five children I can assure you that my homeschooled children and those of the many homeschooling families that I know have social lives to be envied.   The opportunities that these kids have to interact in healthy, supportive ways with people of all ages, educational and socioeconomic levels, interests and skills surpasses that of any "schooled" child I have ever known.  Our big challenge as homeschooling parents is to limit how many of these opportunities we take advantage of so that we still have enough time left in the day to get the math lessons, science experiments and literature essays completed.

    And perhaps the best response I ever heard to this question was from a good friend of mine who admits that her high school years may not have been strong on academic "focus."  She recalls being very engaged in socialization and yet quite a number of teachers lobbed the exact same statement in her direction -  "You are not here to SOCIALIZE, young lady, you are here to learn!"

  3. mkvealsh profile image60
    mkvealshposted 5 years ago

    Absolutely, yes,  homeschooled children miss out on socialization.  That is one of the biggest reason we home school our children.  Our children have never had to deal with bullying, peer pressure, or school shootings.  They have never been offered illicit drugs, cigarettes, or alcohol.  They have been free to develop their own personalities without  pressure to follow the crowd.  They have not been mocked or tormented for their fashion choices, friend choices, or personal beliefs. 

    My children are smart, strong, and can stand on their own two feet.  More importantly, they not only get along with other people (of all ages), they actually care about people and want to put the needs of others before their own.  This is what makes strong, productive citizens of society.

    I am thrilled that our kids have missed out on the "socialization"  available in public schools today.

    1. arizonataylor profile image81
      arizonataylorposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      You make an interesting and valid point.  Do they miss out on any good things too?

    2. mkvealsh profile image60
      mkvealshposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      If you were to ask my kids that question, they would tell you that if they missed anything, it would be the opportunity to play sports.  But what they gained far outweighs anything that they have missed.

    3. SPK5367 profile image68
      SPK5367posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      There are some good things at schools that my children miss out on, but socialization is not one of them.   Homeschooled kids have a distinct advantage over their schooled peers in developing healthy social skills - if their parents encourage it.

  4. fitmom profile image83
    fitmomposted 5 years ago

    When children are home schooled, they can accomplish the learning in a much shorter amount of time. As a result, they have more time to be able to be involved in extracurricular activities and pursue all kinds of hobbies and interests they have. In addition, they have time to volunteer, which is something that the majority of people just don't have time to do. In my opinion, a homeschool child has the flexibility of schedule and time to be a well-rounded student.

  5. profile image0
    Garifaliaposted 5 years ago

    Children can miss out on socialization even in a public school. But on the whole, many probably do. What surprises me is that people in the States don't realize that their tax money should be going to improve education FOR ALL not improve weapons or politicians' well being. I mean isn't that what taxes are for: to better run the country and care for the people?

    Moreover, I believe most Americans homeschool their children due to fear of violence. I don't blame them, of course, but keeping the kids at home or in a confined environment solves no problem; it prolongs it. It's really unfortunate because  my growing up in the States and attendance in public schools (the '70s) was a  true blessing.

    1. Cameron Conner profile image60
      Cameron Connerposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I agree, school should be a bigger concern for us. However, America is loosing sight of the fact that we are in charge. We have let our politicians go back on their promises time after time and still we do nothing about it.

    2. SPK5367 profile image68
      SPK5367posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      I certainly can't speak for most homeschoolers but I (and my many homeschooling friends)  do not homeschool out of a fear of violence.  We homeschool because it offers a set of positive intellectual, familial and personal benefits to our children.

    3. profile image0
      Garifaliaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      In answer to Cameron Conner, it isn't only in the US where the public has allowed the politicians to rule without the nation's unified protest. As for SPK5367, I understand but without meaning to you're creating an even less unified country that way.

    4. SPK5367 profile image68
      SPK5367posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Garifalia - I couldn't disagree more.   Studies show great numbers of homeschoolers grow into civic minded adults.  Thinking people contribute.  This works towards unity.  Schools are not the only or the best means to develop thinking citizens.

    5. profile image0
      Garifaliaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Dear SPK5367,
      That's not what I meant. But when the government stops tending to its nation, it creates for a bigger gap between the two. I agree with what you're saying I work much the same way as homeschooling.

  6. Cameron Conner profile image60
    Cameron Connerposted 5 years ago

    Yes, I even had a homeschooled boy goin my 12th grade in high school. I went to a small private prep school where everyone new everyone. It didn't take long to make friends there either. This kid just could not do it though. I mean everyone tried talking to him but he never really broke out of that shell. He even made increadable grades but when I checked up on him a couple of years later, he had not even made it threw his first year of college before dropping out. Maybe he was just a fluke though.

    1. profile image0
      Garifaliaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      It's unfortuanate that you'd have to say that:  'Maybe he was just a fluke though', my friend. You see, each one of us takes after our parents firstly. How social we are or aren't reflects them directly.

 
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