What do you consider the "good ole days"?

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  1. sholland10 profile image93
    sholland10posted 6 years ago

    What do you consider the "good ole days"?

    Were they really "good" or have you romanticized them?  Historically and/or personally? Does that mean the present is bad and the future is bleak?  How are you going to turn now into the good ole days?

  2. Alecia Murphy profile image86
    Alecia Murphyposted 6 years ago

    I would say childhood. Mainly because it was a time where we didn't question everything but we truly lived in that moment. And while life is fleeting now as we're older, I think that is something important to do as we're older. Our life is flanked by schedules and appointments but we can still manage to take one day at a time.
    What I romanticize most about my childhood is that I had time to be myself, find new parts of myself, and just have fun.

  3. dashingscorpio profile image87
    dashingscorpioposted 6 years ago

    I would say my time in college were the "good ole days" during the mid-late 70s.
    They were full of promise. I loved the freedom that came with living on campus and away from home. Attending classes, going to parties, and other campus activities. It was like being an adult without all the adult responsibilities ( going to work, paying a mortgage, dealing with children...etc) It was a time where I began to make my own decisions without any parental influence. I really don't believe I have romanticized that period of my life.

  4. syzygyastro profile image77
    syzygyastroposted 6 years ago

    The good ole days were the days when there was very little TV, lots of friends to play and associate with, impromptu sports, picnics in the wild with hardly anyone around, swimming on a beach where only a few people are around and you could be au-natural, plenty of outdoor fun, relaxation and sunshine. A summer trip to the farm was also lots of fun over summer holidays. Ice fishing in the wilds in the winter was one of the most memorable experiences. Then there was rock and role and the land of a thousand dances.

    Today, what do we have? Too much TV, video games and internet with the attendant alienation from real social contact. We should have more activity like the good ole days and still have what we have now, but with moderation.

  5. profile image69
    Lance Olsenposted 6 years ago

    The "good ole days"? were the days when America could fight WW1 & WW2 on other continents and stiil be beyond the reach of its enemies.

    911 proved that America is now within the reach of its enemies -- the attackers launched their attacks from inside the US.

    The future is not bleak   IF   this fact is recognized instead of being ignored. We need to learn from history why the results of the Korean War & the Vietnam War were so different for the US compared to the results of WW2 for the US.

    "The 9/11 attacks in the US – and Bali 2002, Madrid 2004, Beslan 2004, London 2005, Mumbai 2008... – how those who are the targets deal with their attackers will decide whether the American way remains the American way or is supplanted by something else. To survive – the USA cannot afford a blind spot here." --
    -- http://numistamp.com/Why-these-WW2-pages-.php

  6. billybuc profile image88
    billybucposted 6 years ago

    Any day that I am breathing is a goodl ole day.  If I  had to pick one decade that I most favored it would be the 60's because there was always something exciting happening and the music was incredible.  Now that I am sober each and every day holds the wonder of life for me, so these last five years have been pretty darn good too.

  7. teaches12345 profile image93
    teaches12345posted 6 years ago

    I think we all remember our childhood as the good old days. We lived our lives as if each day were an adventure and no limits as to what we could do at play.  Life seemed simpler then and maybe it was. As we grow older, our lifestyle becomes busy and sometimes we forget to just "play".

 
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