This website uses cookies

As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

Show Details
Necessary
HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
Features
Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
Marketing
Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
Statistics
Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
jump to last post 1-9 of 9 discussions (18 posts)

Using metaphors while teaching science, is it good or bad?

  1. sriparna profile image81
    sriparnaposted 5 years ago

    Using metaphors while teaching science, is it good or bad?

    I teach Science and I use a lot of metaphors while teaching, to explain difficult concepts. For example in "atoms share electrons in covalent bonding", I say how two friends can bond by sharing food or stationery etc. and many others. More I am becoming experienced as a teacher, I find myself using more and more metaphors, I hope I am not impacting their way of thinking and understanding in any negative way!

  2. prairieprincess profile image96
    prairieprincessposted 5 years ago

    I think it's great to use metaphors in science. Science, especially chemistry and physics, is pretty abstract, and kids need something concrete that they can relate to, to understand the concepts.

    If you are worried about having a bad effect, be sure to point out that is "just a metaphor," and also explain how the metaphor doesn't work exactly, how it's not a "perfect metaphor."

    Great job teaching!

    1. jojo29 profile image70
      jojo29posted 5 years agoin reply to this

      it does...you just have to be very careful though on how to use metaphor.

    2. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      thanks, good advice!

  3. MarleneB profile image98
    MarleneBposted 5 years ago

    I think you are doing a wonderful job. Your way of teaching gives your students something to which they can feel and personally identify. The more personal it is, the more they grasp and understand. I wish my science teachers were as intuitive as you.

    1. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks, very encouraging!

  4. StephanieBCrosby profile image85
    StephanieBCrosbyposted 5 years ago

    Metaphors are a great way to explain a concept. If anything you are expanding their thinking abilities. Metaphors stimulate deeper, more meaningful learning and just education that can be regurgitated. They work on many levels because they help all types of learners: visual, audio/verbal, tactile, and kinesthetic.

    The power of metaphors is profound. For example, I am going to use metaphor as a means to convey a learning model I am developing for my dissertation. If you run across any naysayers, there is plenty of research and even books about the power and usefulness of using metaphors. If you want some researcher names, feel free to contact me!

    And most of science is based on metaphors. Think about how atoms were first described using the plum pudding model and analogy (but I guess you already know that).  So, keep at it with the metaphors and even encourage your students to come up with their own and share them with the class. You could even have a friendly contest for the best one created. Then you could even do a cross-class comparison.

    1. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you sooooo much, lovely ideas also, I will bring up this as a lesson so that children use their own imagination to think of metaphors in science. I will surely get back to you.

    2. StephanieBCrosby profile image85
      StephanieBCrosbyposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      That sounds awesome.  I can't wait.

  5. Learn Things Web profile image91
    Learn Things Webposted 5 years ago

    We learn best by connecting things we don't know to things we do know. I think what you're doing is essential for students to really understand the concepts.

    1. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thank you, great help!

  6. Blond Logic profile image97
    Blond Logicposted 5 years ago

    I think it is an excellent way to make them understand. As Prairie Princess said, "Science, especially chemistry and physics, is pretty abstract, and kids need something concrete that they can relate to, to understand the concepts. " That is it in a nutshell. If teachers made the sciences more understandable or even tangible to the uses in their current or future life, the students would  grasp the subjects so much more easily. It may even make more of them decide to carry on in that field.

    I am happy to say, I feel there is a new breed of teachers out there, including yourself, who are passionate about their subjects. Engaging the students, whether with metaphors they will understand or relevant life examples can only lead to more interest from your students and build desire to learn in them.

    1. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks really, I feel motivated!

  7. The Invincible profile image60
    The Invincibleposted 5 years ago

    It's an excellent idea to use metaphors. This means you are doing two things at a time; English and Science smile

    1. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Yes, that is the idea too, to integrate two subjects!

  8. connorj profile image77
    connorjposted 5 years ago

    https://usercontent1.hubstatic.com/7064020_f260.jpg

    Dear Sripama,
    You are indeed assisting significantly with the way our brains learn. You see our brains hang on to thoughts by associating with what is already in the grey area. Therefore what you are doing is significant to learning. The metaphors can assist significantly with this association... Do not let anyone convince you otherwise.

    1. sriparna profile image81
      sriparnaposted 5 years agoin reply to this

      Thanks so much, very reassuring!

  9. Kevin Peter profile image70
    Kevin Peterposted 5 years ago

    Using metaphors to teach science is really very useful. It provides a realistic idea about the topic among students.

 
working